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Lead in geocoins?


bugsmasher69
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Watching all the news stories about the millions of toys being recalled that were made in china because of the large amounts of lead in the paint made me start wondering about our geocoins. Most are made in china so I wonder if the coins have excess amounts of lead in them too. Has anyone checked this out yet or is it not something to be concerned about?

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Watching all the news stories about the millions of toys being recalled that were made in china because of the large amounts of lead in the paint made me start wondering about our geocoins.

 

I wondered about this too, but from a different point of view.

Here in Australia we have recently had some horrific stories published about the suffering of workers in China who make the banned toys, due to the toxic materials they are exposed to.

Should we be concerned about the work conditions under which geocoins are made?

I seem to recall there was some information put in this forum some time ago about how geocoins are made, but I can’t find it.

Can anyone provide a link, or such information, please?

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Watching all the news stories about the millions of toys being recalled that were made in china because of the large amounts of lead in the paint made me start wondering about our geocoins.

 

I wondered about this too, but from a different point of view.

Here in Australia we have recently had some horrific stories published about the suffering of workers in China who make the banned toys, due to the toxic materials they are exposed to.

Should we be concerned about the work conditions under which geocoins are made?

I seem to recall there was some information put in this forum some time ago about how geocoins are made, but I can’t find it.

Can anyone provide a link, or such information, please?

 

Never even thought about that. If it is unhealthy for us to play with them, must be really unhealthy for them to make them.

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I drive car, sit at stop lights and in traffic jams every day and breath in the carbon Monoxide they produce, eat processed foods and drug inhanced meats which I bet is far worse than second hand smoke or handling these coins. So I look at it as the lead based coins I handle every so often are far safer than things we do on a normal basis. :anitongue:

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All things said and done, the health of those less fortunate than us should be more of a consideration we are currently giving them.

I remember the health of the Migrant workers in California many years ago and then with international pressures made improvements to their working conditions (but more improvements can be made today).

Now most cachers I have met are very conscientious of environmental issues, and ensuring we abide by our own rules...cache in cache out.

Now I read of the lead scares and how flippant we can be because this really doesn't affect us..bla bla bla.

But what about the worker? Are these the New Mexican workers of modern times? Are we enabling the Wal-Mart’s of old and the new sweat shop conditions by not demanding higher standards for the products we are enjoying?

Do what you like, but this does make me think now whether I really want to enable someone to get richer on the backs of the poor workers health.

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Its not a matter of flippant.. its sadly todays society.

 

Daily I am exposed to things that I have no choice over that MAY harm me, or my kids. Cigarette smoke (Im a non-smoker), pesticides, lawn treatments, radio waves, microwaves, cell phone signals, lead, chemicals, additives, trans fats, etc... etc.. etc...

 

While I understand the concern, I think that in the next 10 years we will likely be in panic mode over all the horrible things our bodies are exposed to, and the possible effects.

 

I think perhaps they may consider being jobless a worse fate if you consider the economy. Sadly, almost all companies pay little to no attention to the workers problems, or health. While boycotting, or discontinuing business may seem like a step, it very likely will NOT help improve conditions until ALL of the BIG companies begin to make changes.

 

And, it still will not prevent the workers from taking on other high-risk jobs available to them.

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I was wondering how long it would take before someone asked.

 

Don't let your children chew on them.

 

Yes they do contain higher amounts of lead in the paints and enamels.

Can't give you a figure on % though.

I don't think you should let adults chew on them either :anitongue::anitongue:

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My house and barn were built in '42, as was most of my town. The lead-based paint ban didn't take effect until '77... and then covers only a few specific paints. As far as residences, it only banned lead paint in those built with Federal money. Most of us have been around lead-based paints and products every day of our lives with no ill effect.

 

The current lead issues with China are strictly political manipulation and media band-wagon.

 

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 2, 1977

Release # 77-096

CPSC Announces Final Ban On Lead-Containing Paint

 

WASHINGI'ON, D.C. (Sept. 2) -- The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has culminated a major regulatory proceeding by issuing a final ban on lead-containing paint and on toys and furniture coated with such paint. This action was taken to reduce the risk of lead poisoning in children who may ingest paint chips or peelings.

 

Until now, the maximum level of lead allowed in consumer paints has been 0.5 percent. CPSC has lowered this amount to 0.06 percent, a level conforming with the maximum permissible under the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act. This Act, administered primarily by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, prohibits application of lead-based paint to housing constructed or rehabilitated with federal assistance.

 

Exempted from the new ban are mirrors backed with lead-containing paint which are part of articles of furniture, as well as artists' paints and related materials. Also exempted, provided they bear specified cautionary labeling, are certain agricultural and industrial coatings, touch-up coatings for appliances and lawn and garden equipment, graphic arts coatings, and certain coatings for powered model aircraft.

 

This ban under the Consumer Product Safety Act will take effect 180 days after publication September 1 in the Federal Register and will apply to products manufactured on and after that date.

 

Also, most everything the US Government, especially the military, owns or can get close to is painted with lead-based paint.

Edited by TheAlabamaRambler
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Also, most everything the US Government, especially the military, owns or can get close to is painted with lead-based paint.

 

:rolleyes:

 

Should I be worried about sanding down those ammo cans when I am prepping them for becoming a cache? I never considered that the paint on the ammo cans could be lead based.

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Lead based paint on items that young children and toddlers will obviously place in their mouths is something that "responsible" parent should look to avoid.

 

Letting those same children handle a choking hazard such as coins unsupervised, lead based paint or not... makes me wonder how "responsible" those same parent actually are.

 

Items with lead paint are only as dangerous as you let them become.

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Somewhat off the original topic, but lead related ...

 

Recently bought an A/C cell phone charger from a national chain that specializes in selling things with Circuitry. After opening the package I noticed a warning on the back, at the bottom, in very small print. It said the charger contained lead and you should wash your hands after handling. I washed my hands after reading that and again right after I returned it to the clerk.

 

I never heard of a charger having enough lead to be a concern.

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Dear Coin Consumers,

For your health and safety, please do not eat the geocoins. Wash your hands after fondling them, and keep away from children under the age of 6 years old.

Protect Your Family From Lead In Your Home.

Thank you. This has been a public service announcement.

Eartha

Groundspeak Volunteer

 

Lead is a serious concern. Most comes from the dust from lead paint in windows when you raise them up and down. It settles on the floor and very young children learn by touching, seeing, and TASTING. So when their toy rolls in the dust, they pick it up and taste it, ingesting lead paint dust. It is not because they sit there peeling paint chips and eating them like potato chips and this is why parents of children under 6 years old should be careful. Intact lead paint on a house by itself is not dangerous, it's when it's in bad shape. So, coins are small and are bite-sized, and parents should keep them away from children just for that reason, if nothing else. If you are concerned, you could have them tested.

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My house and barn were built in '42, as was most of my town. The lead-based paint ban didn't take effect until '77... and then covers only a few specific paints. As far as residences, it only banned lead paint in those built with Federal money. Most of us have been around lead-based paints and products every day of our lives with no ill effect.

 

The current lead issues with China are strictly political manipulation and media band-wagon.

 

 

North Americans were breathing lead compounds from the 30's or 40's, released from the burning of gasoline that had tetraethyl lead in it until leaded gasoline was finally banned in the 80's. That's at least two generations of people who managed to live to adulthood.

 

I agree, the lead issues are mostly FUD from the media. Most of what little danger there is, is to toddlers who can't keep things out of their mouths.

 

Did you know nitrogen is a major component of nearly every explosive? Despite this being known at senior levels of government and by major corporations, people are being forced to inhale nitrogen every day. OMG!!1!!!11!!!!!one!!!!eleven!!

Edited by geoSquid
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My house and barn were built in '42, as was most of my town. The lead-based paint ban didn't take effect until '77... and then covers only a few specific paints. As far as residences, it only banned lead paint in those built with Federal money. Most of us have been around lead-based paints and products every day of our lives with no ill effect.

 

The current lead issues with China are strictly political manipulation and media band-wagon.

 

 

North Americans were breathing lead compounds from the 30's or 40's, released from the burning of gasoline that had tetraethyl lead in it until leaded gasoline was finally banned in the 80's. That's at least two generations of people who managed to live to adulthood.

 

 

"Live to adulthood" is a bit vague. Yes, enough people have lived long enough to pass on their genes to a new generation and keep the species going, but I like to think maybe we can shoot for more. I've been working this summer for a health insurance company, and I see a lot of forms going by for people with Alzheimer's and other neurological disorders. Not all of the patients are that old either. Some as young as in their 50's. Is there a correlation between environmental toxins and these ailments? We don't know yet, but history shows that people have often lived in situations that were far from healthy without knowing what was being done to them.

Only a few hundred years ago, people used to throw raw sewage into the streets and into the same water they used for drinking. :D They saw no connection between this act and sickness. I think decades down the line, we'll be looking back at this time, as we now look back at those eras, and wonder... "what were we thinking!!!"

 

As to the safety of manufacturing the coins... I used to work for a jewelry designer, who refused to work with enamels. There was money to be made, but he thought the process was far too dangerous. He knew what the enamels contained.

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