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Sometime though we come across a cache that has problems. For instance a vitamin bottle that has been chewed through. We take a picture and report to the owner as this is something that we would like to know if a cache of ours is failing.

 

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons. One being the above example. Although about half of the time we fail to get a response.

 

The emails are not negative in nature.

 

I always contact through the web site so no mail would get inadvertently placed in a bulk folder.

 

If someone emailed you about something- would you ignore it or reply?

 

It just seems to me that a simple reply would be kind. Do you find the same thing when emailing other local cachers?

 

Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. :anibad: These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

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Since this is a caching community/etiquette question rather than a Geocaching.com feature question or bug report, I am moving your thread from the Web Site forum to the Geocaching Topics forum.

 

I have a template that I use if someone hides a cache and doesn't answer the reviewer questions within a week to ten days. It surprises me that people take the time to hide a cache and write up a page, but don't answer questions from their reviewer. So I disable the pages to get those caches out of my queue waiting to be published. Not a week goes by when I don't make use of this form letter.

Edited by Keystone
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"ignore it or reply" - those are not the only two options....

 

While I often reply to such messages, I do not always acknowledge them. I always take them seriously and go check on my caches - I just don't reply.

 

I have often been taught that one and 2 word emails are unecesary. If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email. Very often the email I get of this nature just doesn't seem to require me to respond. Things like "I was at your xxxx cache today and noticed it had a bit of moisture in it - thought you should know" - to me just seems complete as is and something that did not require a response. After reading this - I am sorry. If I have ever offended anybody by this behavior, I apologize.

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Sometime though we come across a cache that has problems. For instance a vitamin bottle that has been chewed through. We take a picture and report to the owner as this is something that we would like to know if a cache of ours is failing.

 

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons. One being the above example. Although about half of the time we fail to get a response.

 

The emails are not negative in nature.

 

I always contact through the web site so no mail would get inadvertently placed in a bulk folder.

 

If someone emailed you about something- would you ignore it or reply?

 

It just seems to me that a simple reply would be kind. Do you find the same thing when emailing other local cachers?

 

Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. B) These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

With the sole exception of the occasional very weird PM/email (such as the 2006 PM/email from a local discontented teenage Goth/urban explorer girl who has a court record of a misdemeanor vandalism conviction and who begged me to reveal the location of the abandoned nuclear reactor building which is the final stage of our PUC #9 cache so that she and her teenage urban explorer friends could go "visit" it), we always reply to all emails and PMs sent by other cachers and even by reptoid alien shapeshifters pretending to be geocachers.

 

We DO sometimes get weird replies from other cachers to whom we have sent a PM or email regarding a geocaching matter; two funny examples follow:

 

We once sent an email to a local geocacher asking him to immediately remove his find log -- or to change it to a note -- for one of our multistage Psycho Urban Caches, as all he had done was find the first stage of three stages (the last two stages are available only to cachers who have found five of our other PUCs and who have completed other requirements as well. He was rather astounded at our request, but he did comply.

 

We once sent an email to a local geocacher who had logged multiple finds on one of our wilderness caches; seems that he had once found it on his own, and every time he visited it again with his geofriends, he would log a new find on the same cache; we asked him to convert all find logs but the first to notes instead. He was rather astounded at our request, and wrote back telling us that our request sounded "negative" (in this case, we immediately held a pity party for him.)

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Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. ;) These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

 

Thank you for your posting. B)

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"ignore it or reply" - those are not the only two options....

 

While I often reply to such messages, I do not always acknowledge them. I always take them seriously and go check on my caches - I just don't reply.

 

I have often been taught that one and 2 word emails are unecesary. If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email. Very often the email I get of this nature just doesn't seem to require me to respond. Things like "I was at your xxxx cache today and noticed it had a bit of moisture in it - thought you should know" - to me just seems complete as is and something that did not require a response. After reading this - I am sorry. If I have ever offended anybody by this behavior, I apologize.

I completely agree.

 

I can't tell you how many times I've sent an email to a staffer and recieved a responsory email of "OK" or "Your welcome". These emails only serve to waste my time.

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I wouldn't presume they are getting the message. Some emails sent through the website do go into spam folders.

 

My owner notifications, weekly announcements, watchlist mail, and new cache notifications all show up in my regular mail folder. Notes sent to me through my profile end up in my spam folder.

 

I've changed everything I can change. I just have to look at my spam folder every few days...but how many people don't look there for email?

 

Also, you say the notes "aren't negative in nature" -While you may be trying to put a positive spin on the note, the receiver may not read it that way.

Edited by Neos2
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Since this is a caching community/etiquette question rather than a Geocaching.com feature question or bug report, I am moving your thread from the Web Site forum to the Geocaching Topics forum.

 

I have a template that I use if someone hides a cache and doesn't answer the reviewer questions within a week to ten days. It surprises me that people take the time to hide a cache and write up a page, but don't answer questions from their reviewer. So I disable the pages to get those caches out of my queue waiting to be published. Not a week goes by when I don't make use of this form letter.

 

I think our response time to a reviewer question was about 90 seconds. B)

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I wouldn't presume they are getting the message. Some emails sent through the website do go into spam folders.

 

My owner notifications, weekly announcements, watchlist mail, and new cache notifications all show up in my regular mail folder. Notes sent to me through my profile end up in my spam folder.

 

I've changed everything I can change. I just have to look at my spam folder every few days...but how many people don't look there for email?

I'm not sure why a response email would be required.

 

Let's look at a hypothetical situation. Knight2000 sends me an email regarding my cache. I can either send him a response email that says "Thanks for letting me know.", or not. Either way, I may or may not go out and fix the cache. If I do, I'll clear the 'Needs Maintenance' flag that Knight2000 triggered when he logged my cache. If I don't, I won't.

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"ignore it or reply" - those are not the only two options....

 

While I often reply to such messages, I do not always acknowledge them. I always take them seriously and go check on my caches - I just don't reply.

 

I have often been taught that one and 2 word emails are unecesary. If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email. Very often the email I get of this nature just doesn't seem to require me to respond. Things like "I was at your xxxx cache today and noticed it had a bit of moisture in it - thought you should know" - to me just seems complete as is and something that did not require a response. After reading this - I am sorry. If I have ever offended anybody by this behavior, I apologize.

This is interesting . . . I am compulsive about responding to email . . . and often acknowledge informative emails with a "Thanks for letting me know."

 

It never dawned on me that someone would not want an ackowledgement . . . ;)

 

Now that I know this . . . I'm still not sure I can moderate my compulsive behavior . . . :DB)

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I've always had positive responses when e-mailing cachers. But I've only e-mailed either to ask for a hint or say "yeah, I agree with what you posted" or something like that. However, I have posted maintenance requests -- which I don't do lightly -- most of which had been ignored, even though mine is usually the second or third request. That annoys me, especially if the owner is someone who is a long standing active cacher and has a number of missing or injured caches. And once I did a cemetery cache where I posted my find along with my feelings of discomfort at trampling through a child's gravesite. Another cacher after me also posted her concern about this type of hide. The owner came back with a "note" log saying to please not do anymore of her grave caches because she thinks it is a beautiful thing to bring people to these sites, etc. B) I think she was aiming her note at the person after me, but I thought it was pretty rude. I mean, people are going to gripe about caches. It's part of the game. Heck, I gripe about the bushwacking caches that I LOVE.

 

My guess about the unanswered e-mails is that people love to hide things for other people to find, but they don't necessarily love to communicate with the seekers. There's also a good chance they'd gotten several other complaints and don't see the need to reply to all of them. But they should at least post a note on the log page to indicate if they are going to address the problem

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I can't say I've really ignored an email sent through GC. Most of the emails I send/receive require some sort of reply. My listed GC email is for GC related stuff - I've got several others that I play with and I can just bulk delete the crap in them.

 

off topic rambling - You want to talk a waste of time, I'll let you play with my work email, between the spam, stupid jokes and forward this to 10 of your friends or the sky will fall (I don't have 10 friends) I'm ready to pull the plug on the machine just for fun.

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This is interesting . . . I am compulsive about responding to email . . . and often acknowledge informative emails with a "Thanks for letting me know."

 

It never dawned on me that someone would not want an ackowledgement . . .

I agree.

I'm from the old school, I guess; there is such a thing as courtesy. Responding to emails is not the most important thing in life, but acknowledging that someone thought enough about your cache to take the time to let you know there is a problem deserves a thanks. It only takes a second to hit "reply" and type "thanks."

 

I also agree that sometimes a positive comment can come across negatively. At that time I might refrain from telling that dumb *&)^* to go (^$%$^% his/herself. Courtesy.

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"ignore it or reply" - those are not the only two options....

 

While I often reply to such messages, I do not always acknowledge them. I always take them seriously and go check on my caches - I just don't reply.

 

I have often been taught that one and 2 word emails are unecesary. If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email. Very often the email I get of this nature just doesn't seem to require me to respond. Things like "I was at your xxxx cache today and noticed it had a bit of moisture in it - thought you should know" - to me just seems complete as is and something that did not require a response. After reading this - I am sorry. If I have ever offended anybody by this behavior, I apologize.

I completely agree.

 

I can't tell you how many times I've sent an email to a staffer and recieved a responsory email of "OK" or "Your welcome". These emails only serve to waste my time.

To each their own.

 

I disagree. We live in a time when many have to worry if email is blocked or sent to bulk folders. A simple reply no matter how short is appreciated by some.

 

I can understand possibly skipping a "your welcome" but not a "thank you". (You may not have been suggesting skipping a thank you though. B) )

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I'm not sure why a response email would be required.

 

Let's look at a hypothetical situation. Knight2000 sends me an email regarding my cache. I can either send him a response email that says "Thanks for letting me know.", or not. Either way, I may or may not go out and fix the cache. If I do, I'll clear the 'Needs Maintenance' flag that Knight2000 triggered when he logged my cache. If I don't, I won't.

In the instance i mentioned above about the picture and animal eating the cache the owner did reply and was very thankful stating that most wouldn't email them let alone send them the picture to show the damage. Since then we have emailed or PM'd about several other things.

 

Where the hider is an active cacher i may skip the needs maintenance and email them first. If they dont reply then i may post the appropriate log. I have done this whenever i have a question and so far it has all turned out well.

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"Tells you something about the hider!" he said with a shrug. I have emailed cache owners a few times to notify them of problems. The good owners respond and tend to their caches. It seems also that these caches were the product of more thought and care on the part of the owner.

 

In a couple of cases, no response. I went so far as to post a 'needs archiving' on one cache that had gone missing. The owner didn't respond to an email inquiry about the cache, and hadn't been online in a year. It turns out he had taken a break from the sport and did finally resurface when his cache was set to be archived.

 

Another one that really amazes me is a cache that I found muggled. It wasn't a particularly good hide, so muggling was probably inevitable. However, my find was the first on record to report a muggling. The owner did not respond to a 'needs maintenance' log (I was able to partially reassemble the cache and rehide it in its original location), nor to a friendly note a month later.

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I am really amazed that several in this thread are making the logical leap that a lack of reply email somehow equals that they don't care about the cache hide.

 

Not true in my case, I simply do not see any need to reply sometimes. As noted above, many emails seem complete in and of themselves.

 

Not inconsiderate, or lazy or whatever. I just don't need see a need to send a note saying "got it".

 

Having read this thread though - I guess I should........

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Sometime though we come across a cache that has problems. For instance a vitamin bottle that has been chewed through. We take a picture and report to the owner as this is something that we would like to know if a cache of ours is failing.

 

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons. One being the above example. Although about half of the time we fail to get a response.

 

The emails are not negative in nature.

 

I always contact through the web site so no mail would get inadvertently placed in a bulk folder.

 

If someone emailed you about something- would you ignore it or reply?

 

It just seems to me that a simple reply would be kind. Do you find the same thing when emailing other local cachers?

 

Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. B) These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

My experience has been about the same as yours, I get a reply about 50% of the time.

 

To answer your specific question. If someone emailed me about something, yes I would reply. As much to the point, if I emailed someone about something, I know I would appreciate a reply back.

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I almost alwasy reply. What kind of reply depends on the orginal email.

 

Sometiems I'll ask a clarifying question. For example if you sent me a photo of a chewed up ratty container I might ask where you found it exactly since I don't use ratty containers, but we do have someone who changes out caches of one kind for another and there may be more than one cache that's impacted by your find.

 

Oddly enough when I do ask a clarifying question only about 50% bother to reply. B)

Edited by Renegade Knight
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I try to respond to every email I get...but I do miss one every now and again. I appreciate those that take the time to write me, and it gives me a chance to make new "friends" as well!

 

I will write an owner if I see a problem that I think is important, but usually, I just leave the info in my log. I've been sent thank-yous from owners for this as some just don't do that B)

 

I also tend to write cachers that visit our hides...not every time like I used to (wow, too many visitors to do that any more)...but I ALWAYS write newbs (especially those that picked our hide to make their start) and offer advice and a welcome to caching!

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I try to always reply to any E-mail I get. Most of the time a reply is expected, as someone wants to know something. In general I will send a short acknowledgment note to any messages I'm sent.

 

I like to use "Read receipt" on sent messages if I'm sending something that doesn't require a response, but I still would like to know it was delivered.

 

E-mail is very quick and it doesn't bother me at all to send or receive a message that only says: "Thanks", or "Got your note."

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Speaking for myself, I would reply to an email 1) to acknowledge that I received an email 2) because it seems the polite thing to do for someone who time and effort to contact me. Least I could do is write back. Maybe its a southern thing...

 

I've only contacted 2 people in regards to caches. One was to confirm a cache location that I guessed I was not physically able to retrieve because of vertigo...owners wrote back a NICE note and even offered to come get it for me since I did know where it was. Second time was to ask for help in choosing a route to a cache that I can't even get close to because the GPSr keeps routing me into a subdivision cul-de-sac. Never heard back a word which was disappointing. So I'm 1 for 2 on cache owner replies.

 

Only emails I don't reply to are the ones from a paranoid psycho in Colorado who wants me boiled alive in tapir spit. B)

Edited by PlantAKiss
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At the very least, a reply saying "Thanks for the heads up concerning GCabcde cache. I'll get out there for maintenance as soon as possible" is in order, just to let them know message received.

 

After maintenance, maybe another saying "Am glad you brought that to my attention. Cache is back online. Thanks again."

 

Maintenance is a cache owner's responsibility. Any assistance or notification with/of problems should always merit at least a "Thank you"

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I like to use "Read receipt" on sent messages if I'm sending something that doesn't require a response, but I still would like to know it was delivered.

I know that before when i tried Incruddymail they had this.

 

Do other web-based email sites have this?

 

I use Yahoo/SBC/ATT or whatever it will be next week. I have for years and i don't recall seeing that option on Yahoo.

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I wish you could get a receipt from the GC mails. Then you would at least have an idea of the user got the email or not.

Many email servers and many email clients either do not support sending or auto destroy the auto read or arrival receipts. And any client software worth its salt allows the user to configure how to handle those.

 

They are near useless.

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I usually try to respond to those notes. I will say, however, that I didn't realize that people use the "pm" aspect on the forums. Sorry, I'm not real technologically savvy, and didn't realize I was getting "mail" or messages here! I had 3 messages from 2006 I had not noticed... and I don't think the "flag" in the upper right corner said anything about new messages.

 

I hope those that wrote to me, hoping for a reply, weren't offended when I didn't reply! :D

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Whether I reply or not depends on the subject of the initial email, who sent it, and whether they asked a legitimate question but I don't feel automatically compelled to respond to every unsolicited message I receive. For example, I had 41 emails today offering various "services" but I'm happy with my mortgage, the size and functionality of a certain part of my anatomy, and I'm sorry, but the former Nigerian Finance Minister is just going to have to find someone with more free time. I also had 2 snail mails from Citibank (hooray, I'm pre-approved) and Defenders of Wildlife (they need me to complete a petition).

 

If I email a friend or a family member, I expect a response. The same goes for co-workers on work-related topics. However, if I send a largely anonymous email through GC.com, I don't necessarily expect a reply. If they reply, great. If they don't, life goes on.

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Dunno. You seem to have built a reputation as a nudge and being the cache police. I'd probably ignore your e-mails as well. :D I have more a lot more finds than you do, and I think I've e-mailed five cache owners concerning problems with the cache. One can usually tell if the cache owner is absent, by checking his/her profile page. Believe it or not, some geocachers have died, or stopped geocaching. 50% is not a bad rate of return e-mails.

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons.

Numerous times on 152 finds? Must be some very sloppy cache owners in your neighborhood! I've e-mailed five cache owners out of 1200 finds.

I'd say that you have a higher than expected response rate!

Sometime though we come across a cache that has problems. For instance a vitamin bottle that has been chewed through. We take a picture and report to the owner as this is something that we would like to know if a cache of ours is failing.

 

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons. One being the above example. Although about half of the time we fail to get a response.

 

The emails are not negative in nature.

 

I always contact through the web site so no mail would get inadvertently placed in a bulk folder.

 

If someone emailed you about something- would you ignore it or reply?

 

It just seems to me that a simple reply would be kind. Do you find the same thing when emailing other local cachers?

 

Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. :D These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

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This is interesting . . . I am compulsive about responding to email . . . and often acknowledge informative emails with a "Thanks for letting me know."

 

It never dawned on me that someone would not want an ackowledgement . . .

I agree.

I'm from the old school, I guess; there is such a thing as courtesy. Responding to emails is not the most important thing in life, but acknowledging that someone thought enough about your cache to take the time to let you know there is a problem deserves a thanks. It only takes a second to hit "reply" and type "thanks."

 

 

+ 1

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Not inconsiderate, or lazy or whatever.

 

I don't think that was the suggestion.

 

However, I go back to my early question. If you are told about the cache on the phone or face to face do or rather would you adopt the same no response attitude? I suspect not.

 

This leads back to the OP's initial question/point as I see it. Why is a polite response in one instance probably considered appropriate and/or expected and not in the other?

 

Personally, I don't understand why manners need to go out the window when the communication is online but then maybe I am old school :D .

 

Regards

Andrew

Edited by Aushiker
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If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email.

 

I am curious then. If you are speaking to the person face to face or the phone, do you adopt the same reasonng/attitude?

 

Regards

Andrew

No but email is not anywhere close to the same as a face-to-face or phone, instant on the spot communication. It is an easy/convenient way to communicate information similar to leaving a note on one's windshield and/or office door. To replace the age old inter-office memo. It should never be used in place of a telephone call or in-person communication. Something that does not require an instant on the spot response or acknowledgement of reciept. At least in the context I cite above.

 

I am reminded of a business I worked at - the boss instructed all employees to evacuate - via email for a bomb threat. At the time, the IT department had set the email clients to check for new email every 30 minutes. Many employees kept their email open but only checked the messages 2 or 3 times per day. The building evacuated several times over the next few hours. Very good lesson. Email should not be used to communicate time-sensitive information that requires immediate action.

 

If there is a question or need to respond - I do. If it was only informational in nature - I often see no need to respond. My intent is not to be rude in any way. Do you acknowledge when a post-it note is left on your desk? I think this is all in how you view email communications. I do not elevate it to the same arena as instant messaging, phone calls and in person talks. Many of you do.

 

As preiously stated - I will begin to send "got it" messages as a result of this thread no matter the note. But you can understand where I am coming from - right??

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If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email.

 

I am curious then. If you are speaking to the person face to face or the phone, do you adopt the same reasonng/attitude?

 

Regards

Andrew

It should never be used in place of a telephone call or in-person communication. Something that does not require an instant on the spot response or acknowledgement of reciept.

That was never suggested. I don't think I have not made my point clear ... my point is about manners ... about appropriate communication in context of the points made by the OP.

 

Email should not be used to communicate time-sensitive information that requires immediate action.

Again, I am sorry but I really don't understand the relevance of this point in the context of this dicussion.

 

Do you acknowledge when a post-it note is left on your desk?
Depends. If it is a note where confirmation maybe expected then yes. I take into the consideration the nature of the communication. There are communications which are one way and ones where they are not. In the context of the OP's posting, I am of the view that the type of communication is one where a response/acknowledgement would be appropriate and expected.

 

Regards

Andrew

Edited by Aushiker
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I'll quote myself here:

I think this is all in how you view email communications. I do not elevate it to the same arena as instant messaging, phone calls and in person talks. Many of you do.

 

That I think is the difference. You think it ill manners - I don't see the relevance of manners - email is simply not on par with the example you suggested. Not to me.

 

Maybe I am just jaded - as I have used email in some form since the late 70's. I have taken the time today to review more then 20 Internet sites on email manners and found 2 that suggested a reply acknowledgement to all emails. However, 2 others felt as I do that short acknowledments are a waste of time for all involved. The others did not speak to this subject. Odd that the majority here feel differently.

 

I can learn though.......

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I have taken the time today to review more then 20 Internet sites on email manners and found 2 that suggested a reply acknowledgement to all emails.

I think you are missing the point or maybe the sites are. It is not about acknowledgement of all emails, it is about acknowledgement of emails where it might be reasonable to expect the same. A huge difference.

 

I would suggest a review of the pchyological literature and not websites and you might find a different and more informed analysis of communication, manners etc. That said, it is probably more effort than is warranted in the context of this discussion.

 

One thing to consider or ignore as you wish :D :

 

If I send an email that I might resonablely expect a response to, and I don't get a response. Am I to:

  1. assume it was seen and read?
  2. assume it was not received and therefore not read?
  3. assume it was ignored?
  4. assume it will be taken on board and actioned if appropriate?
  5. assume something else I had not considered?

I don't know about others or your kindself, but I do know this, my mind reading skills have not developed to the point I can answer the questions posed above, so to me an acknlowedegment is appropriate in such a context and it is considerate and it is cheap. Manners is costless in my view.

 

Thanks for your input ... this has been an interesting discussion.

 

Regards

Andrew

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I generally would reply, especially if the note was regarding something that needed attention, but some may post the reply as a note on the cache instead. I have found that some emails sent to me through the site had noreply@geocaching.com as the return address, could you have the settings wrong and be hiding your return addrss, that makes it a pain to get back to the person, you gotta go thru the site to their profile...

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I'll quote myself here:

I think this is all in how you view email communications. I do not elevate it to the same arena as instant messaging, phone calls and in person talks. Many of you do.

 

That I think is the difference. You think it ill manners - I don't see the relevance of manners - email is simply not on par with the example you suggested. Not to me.

 

Maybe I am just jaded - as I have used email in some form since the late 70's. I have taken the time today to review more then 20 Internet sites on email manners and found 2 that suggested a reply acknowledgement to all emails. However, 2 others felt as I do that short acknowledments are a waste of time for all involved. The others did not speak to this subject. Odd that the majority here feel differently.

 

I can learn though.......

Well I for one agree with you. I both have sent e-mails and recieved e-mails from local cachers. If I feel that the e-mail I got was informational, I respond usually by disabling or posting a note to the cache page. "Something like looks like this may need some repair" If I recieve a question I will of couse respond.

 

And to be clear this is how I hope that others treat me. I will let you know thru an e-mail or note on the cache page if I think that there is information that you should recieve, but unless I have asked a question it is up to you to deal with the info at your own leasure.

 

Edit to add that WSR also hit a good point. If you have effectivly sent me a e-mail that I can't reply to without going to your profile to respond, then I will assume you don't actually want a responce. I will very rarely respond blind, that displays a much worse breach of manners in my oppinon. (probibly not the case in the OP, but something to think about in the way GC is set up)

Edited by AndrewRJ
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"ignore it or reply" - those are not the only two options....

 

While I often reply to such messages, I do not always acknowledge them. I always take them seriously and go check on my caches - I just don't reply.

 

I have often been taught that one and 2 word emails are unecesary. If all I have to say is "thanks for letting me know" - it doesn't seem worth the email. Very often the email I get of this nature just doesn't seem to require me to respond. Things like "I was at your xxxx cache today and noticed it had a bit of moisture in it - thought you should know" - to me just seems complete as is and something that did not require a response. After reading this - I am sorry. If I have ever offended anybody by this behavior, I apologize.

This is interesting . . . I am compulsive about responding to email . . . and often acknowledge informative emails with a "Thanks for letting me know."

 

It never dawned on me that someone would not want an ackowledgement . . . :D

 

Now that I know this . . . I'm still not sure I can moderate my compulsive behavior . . . :D:D

I'm not sure it's compulsive or courteous. If the email is nice I will always respond. I am appreciative when people let me know about issues with any of my caches. Edited by TrailGators
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Sometime though we come across a cache that has problems. For instance a vitamin bottle that has been chewed through. We take a picture and report to the owner as this is something that we would like to know if a cache of ours is failing.

 

I have emailed numerous active cachers for different reasons. One being the above example. Although about half of the time we fail to get a response.

 

The emails are not negative in nature.

 

I always contact through the web site so no mail would get inadvertently placed in a bulk folder.

 

If someone emailed you about something- would you ignore it or reply?

 

It just seems to me that a simple reply would be kind. Do you find the same thing when emailing other local cachers?

 

Of course we live in an time when people rarely send thank you cards. Some would rather send a thank you email. My sister got lots of gifts at her wedding and thought a simple thank you verbally was enough. :D These are all a different topic- but it kind of relates.

 

All the time. :D

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i usually respond. for reasons i do not understand, many emails about my caches go to either a watchlist folder, or spam. since there are thousands of emails in the watchlist folder, i often miss them.

 

of emails from cachers i DO get, i respond to most quickly. for some of them i don't follow up as quickly as i might since i've been sick since april 2005 and although i'm recovering, i have limited resources.

 

then there's the emails that i get asking me to do this or that thing; i got an email from a guy trying to start a geocaching magazine. he sent me email because i might be interested based on the fact that i had posted to a thread about it.

 

...my post stating that i was not interested and would not read it or write for it.

 

and then there was the guy who wrote to me offering to trade one of his cards (not even laminated) for my signature cd and dvd. he assured me that i'd get publicity because he'd put them on his list.

 

...beg pardon? i didn't dignify that one with a response.

 

but most of the time i answer the mail i get.

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I would respond to a geocaching e-mail. I think I've responded to all so far, though any email to me are welcome.

 

As far as the second part,,,,,,,I was driving home from Texas today and I passed the same trucker a couple times and he was driving very well. for kicks, I decided to call the "how am i driving #" on his bumper and a dude answered and said "what # please". I said "399". he says "OK what did he do?" I say "well he's driving excellently. I've driven by him twice and he is driving in his lane and not gliding in to anyones way and he is moving for faster traffic and eveything." The dispatcher says "Oh! Good. We don't usually get these calls." I say "I know." He says "Thanks." and I say "no problem."

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