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What would you have done?


The Jester
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This morning I went for Elves Love To Hike, but while putting on my boots at the trailhead I could here thunder rumbling thru the clouds. No rain - then, that came later - so I headed out. I've been out in thunder storms before (on Grand Teton, 13,700 feet, we'd just gotten off the summit by a few hundred feet when one rolled over and a strike hit the summit) so I wasn't too concerned. I was just wondering what you might do in a similar situation? Go for it? Or bail? Oh, yeah, FTF was up for grabs - would that change your thinking?

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I would've bailed, as several fellow cachers and friends could attest. :o

 

Ever since I was caught on an exposed summit at Specimen Ridge in Yellowstone a few years ago in a bad lightning and hailstorm, I've had something of a phobia about lightning. I grew up with thunderstorms, I love to watch them, but now I have a rather irrational fear of being struck by lightning when I'm outdoors and thunderstorms threaten. I wish I could get over it.... I bailed on getting Alpine Lookout a few weeks ago, only .2 mi from it after a long hike, because of threatening weather. Sigh.

 

Would be interesting to hear from LightningJeff on your question. :)

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It would depend on the trail. I hiked the Boulder River Trail (the one that beat RWW’s right wing) in a t-storm. The trail goes up through the valley between two ridge lines. At one point there was a bright flash and an immediate clap of thunder that rattled my bones. I suspect the lightning had hit up on the ridge above or nearly above me.

 

If the trail is a summit or ridge top, fuggetaboutit

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This morning I went for Elves Love To Hike, but while putting on my boots at the trailhead I could here thunder rumbling thru the clouds. No rain - then, that came later - so I headed out. I've been out in thunder storms before (on Grand Teton, 13,700 feet, we'd just gotten off the summit by a few hundred feet when one rolled over and a strike hit the summit) so I wasn't too concerned. I was just wondering what you might do in a similar situation? Go for it? Or bail? Oh, yeah, FTF was up for grabs - would that change your thinking?

 

If we lived in the area... Trev would have probably went for it FTF or not (although he would use it to justify his going in the eyes of Kate). The Diff/Terrain doesn't seem to be that bad. Kate would have said no way, only someone crazy would go on a venture like that. In the end...it's a coin flip as to whether we would have gone or not depending on who gave in first.

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I would've bailed, as several fellow cachers and friends could attest. :rolleyes:

 

Ever since I was caught on an exposed summit at Specimen Ridge in Yellowstone a few years ago in a bad lightning and hailstorm, I've had something of a phobia about lightning. I grew up with thunderstorms, I love to watch them, but now I have a rather irrational fear of being struck by lightning when I'm outdoors and thunderstorms threaten. I wish I could get over it.... I bailed on getting Alpine Lookout a few weeks ago, only .2 mi from it after a long hike, because of threatening weather. Sigh.

 

Would be interesting to hear from LightningJeff on your question. ;)

Your fear of lightning is not irrational - lightning hurts! :D

 

Getting hit by lightning really is not all that uncommon. If you ignore warning signs and your educated fear, you greatly increase your chances. I agree with Criminal: Ridges and summits are out for me if lightning is threatening. Even if they are treed, they are still the most likely places for lightning to strike - and under a tree is not the place to be when lightning is striking. If you're on a ridge or summit, you need to get down, ASAP, and find as low a spot as you can find, away from tall trees. Wait it out, and try when the storm has moved on.

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Lucy of L&R and I were out hunting fire tower caches on Friday the 13th, Before we left our motel we watched the news talk about high fire danger and thunderstorms in the area we were in. The sky was blue as we started out. We did the Tunk fire tower cache first, which is NE of Riverside. ( where the 15000 acre fire is burning now, started by a lightning strike after we were there). Then we headed for "Buck Up" cache NE of Twisp. We got to the top just as the rain started. We found the cache and were enjoying the view when we heard the thunder so we hightailed it to the nearby car knowing it to be the safest place. We weren't threatened in that area by the lighning though. It seems our threat was one of Abby's friends. The killer rocks that jump out and bite the tires. Although less painful than a lightning strike it was painful indeed.

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It seems our threat was one of Abby's friends. The killer rocks that jump out and bite the tires. Although less painful than a lightning strike it was painful indeed.

Oi! Did you change it yourself? Or how far where you from help?

 

I've lost count of how many flats I've had on Hydi, many in pursuit of caches. The last was at Spokane CM, but yes, I remember well that impressive flat on the steep dirt road above Lake Chelan last summer....

Edited by hydnsek
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It seems our threat was one of Abby's friends. The killer rocks that jump out and bite the tires. Although less painful than a lightning strike it was painful indeed.

Oi! Did you change it yourself? Or how far where you from help?

 

I've lost count of how many flats I've had on Hydi, many in pursuit of caches. The last was at Spokane CM, but yes, I remember well that impressive flat on the steep dirt road above Lake Chelan last summer....

 

Yuppers, Check out the pics on the cache site. We were way up the mountain and no one to help so we did it ourselves midst the rain and cowpies. It had been years since Lucy had changed a tire and eons since I had. When we got back down we went to the nearest town (Twisp) and had them check the lug nuts to make sure they were on tight enough for Lucy long drive home. They confirmed we did a good job on that end.

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Lucy here

Yes, we changed it ourselves.

It had been many years since I had to change a tire . We did a good job. Drove into Twisp to a service station after just to have them check. We did good!

 

Now if those bears would stop with the love calls, I think we'll be alright!

Kudos to you two - I'm impressed. :rolleyes: Despite my many flats, I've never actually had to change one by myself.

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