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My son (9) recently got his own gc ID and logs most of the caches that we find together as a family. I tell him to write whatever he would like in his log online. A story/what he liked/etc. So far, since he is nine, his spelling is not perfect. If you read it, you will understand what he is saying most likely though.

 

Anyway, he saved his money and is working on putting out his first cache. (We will help him to make sure all is ok.) My question is this, how much should we help him write the description? Should we let it be in his own words with mistakes in the spelling?

 

The emails to his email account will be forwarded to us so that we can monitor if the cache needs any help since he is still learning responsibility.

 

Thanks!

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Maybe recommend to him to run it through Microsoft Word, or a similar program, to make sure the spelling is right. I wouldn't worry about it too much though, if it's a word or two that gets missed then oh well. But for learning's sake teach him how to use a spell checker and how to fix his errors, it will come in handy when he starts to type up reports and essays.

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I look at it like this--whenever I do something, no matter if it's at home, work, or play, I try to do it well. You probably model or teach this to your son also.

 

We aren't necessarily looking for perfection, but we use every resource possible (spellchecker, parents, a "beta-test cacher", etc) to make sure the work is quality. I would expect a "childishness" about a child's cache, maybe, but no obvious or avoidable errors.

 

Anyway, best of luck to your son in setting out his first cache!

 

--edited to change a grammatical error that would invalidate my whole point! [:I]--

Edited by celestialmom
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For logs, the mis-spellings are ok, but I think a cache page should be a bit more polished. Tell him it's like a quick writing assignment versus a more in-depth assignment that is edited, reworked, and a final copy. It should be his own description in his own words. It's okay to sound like a nine year old, but help him fix the spelling. Start with a spell-check so he can fix what he can first.

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I agree somewhat with the proofreading/spell checker. What i was hesitant about is that the spell checker will give him several possibilities. Since he is only 9 (starting 4th) he will most likely not be able to figure out which one is the word he needs.

 

Also he doesn't even know that words are misspelled. Usually when adults write something they at least have an idea that something may be misspelled.

 

That was really my concern. I want him to learn responsibility but not be overwhelmed. The spelling words at school are pretty basic now. It wont be until a few years where i imagine they will get harder.

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My daughter is also nine, entering 4th grade. She's been using a spell checker when writing stories on the computer, sending email, etc. for probably over a year now. Although she may not know how to spell all the words she wants, she can usually identify what she wants from the list. If not, she asks! Exposure to words is how kids learn to recognize correct spellings and eventually to spell. What better motivation than using words the kids' choose themselves. Much more meaningful than the spelling words at shcool! (Not that there is anything wrong with systematic teaching of spelling patterns. In fact I'm greatly in favor of that, as well.)

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your plan sounds perfect.

 

many adults can't scrape together good spelling or grammar, so a lot of folks won't notice.

 

perhaps while he's learning his literacy skills, you might recommend to him what we suggest to anyone (adults, too) who is not naturally gifted in this fashion: ask someone to proofread it. since you seem to want to let him stand on is own, perhaps there is an adult friend who can help?

 

if you have plenty of time, maybe this person might go through the document with spellchecker with him. (sorry, grammar not so snappy, but it's late and i'm tired.) that way he can look at the choices spellchecker offers and practice the process of choosing.

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I think it's perfectly fine to assist your child in writing out his cache description, the kid is still learning This isn't the time to decide that he needs to struggle on his own or you need to be complacent.

 

I'm pretty sure his school marks misspelled words as incorrect and then works with the student to correct them. So should you.

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Gosh, I'm kind of "old school" on kids who haven't learned how to spell yet learning to depend on a spell checker. Maybe it's just me, but I think the kids should learn without that then utilize a spell checker to help keep them in line later on after they've been exposed to everybody else's poor spelling. :(

 

I have an adult friend who depends on a spell checker and he is constantly writing about our "grope" instead of our "group." There seems to be a lot of "privet" things as opposed to "private" things. There's much too much to list it all, but suffice to say when questioned he will say "I used spell check." Just the other day in person (privately), I asked him how to spell "group." He answered "g-r-o-p-e." The spell checking feature is being misused and reinforcing the WRONG spellings in his mind.

 

I can't help but wonder how using a spelling checker without supersion will do to a younger person who is just learning to spell.

 

To keep it on topic, I like the idea of your son rolling up his sleeves and getting dirty, so to speak, by delving in to writing up the page on his own. I would take that opportunity to review it with him and use it as a teaching tool to help him learn correctly! What better way to make such a thing enjoyable than to learn spelling while having fun with a game!!

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I can't help but wonder how using a spelling checker without supersion will do to a younger person who is just learning to spell.

Personally, I don't think any child should be using the computer without supervision. Spell check is a good tool. But, it's just a tool. No tool will do the work for you, it will just help you get the work done.

 

I don't like the automatic kind of checker that fixes words for you. The one my daughter uses underlines words it doesn't recognize. This way she can try to fix them herself, or get a list of options to look at if she needs more help. Again, a parent nearby will help guide the right choices.

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First, I think it is good that you are helping your son with this. I am a teacher at a small school in AR and I have learned that the spell checker can help kids to learn correct spelling. There is something about the red lines through words that makes them want to correct them. For an easy spell check I suggest Google Tool Bar. It works within the browser and is not overbearing.

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in the grade 3 and higher classes that I have worked in I advocate the children using a spell check system. I spell it D-i-c-t-i-o-n-a-r-y. they hate it but by the end of the year they get into the habit of checking the book before they check with me. It also cuts down on wrong word reinforcement as they get to read the definition at the same time to see if its the right word or not. there are several good on line dictionaries too.

 

edit to add a bit.

Edited by bwmick
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in the grade 3 and higher classes that I have worked in I advocate the children using a spell check system. I spell it D-i-c-t-i-o-n-a-r-y. they hate it but by the end of the year they get into the habit of checking the book before they check with me. It also cuts down on wrong word reinforcement as they get to read the definition at the same time to see if its the right word or not. there are several good on line dictionaries too.

 

edit to add a bit.

 

;) That was one thing that my Mom did that annoyed me. I would ask her how to spell a word and she would say D-i-c-t-i-o-n-a-r-y. Sometimes it worked and sometimes I was still stumped but if I went back to her I was always carring the dictionary so she could help set me in the right direction so I could find it myself.

 

Spell checker won't tell you if you have used the wrong word if it is spelt write right then it will skip it. It only cheques checks there their spelling not grammer. ;)

 

I used to send out letters to suppliers for my boss and always got someone else to proofread it first it can be hard to see your own mistakes as you know how it is supposed to read and what makes sense to you might be really confusing to someone else.

 

If your son wants to place a cache then I say let him go for it. As long as the coordinates are correct and he has put some effort in to the rest I am sure it will be fine. Anyway he can always go back and edit the page if he isn't happy with it or something needs correcting. :D

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in the grade 3 and higher classes that I have worked in I advocate the children using a spell check system. I spell it D-i-c-t-i-o-n-a-r-y.

Absolutely 100%!!

Don't use a spell checker except maybe to identify unrecognized words. 9 is not too young at all to learn to use a dictionary. IMO computers are in many ways dumbing down people.

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I would work with your son to help him through the whole process. Filling out the online form is a bit tricky for many adults, let alone a 9 yr old! Possibly have the youngster write what he wants in the description first so it can be proofread (you should do the proofreading. After all, you do help with the spelling assignments don't you?). Working with him during this will be a learning experience as well as a bonding one. And yes, the dictionary is a great idea!

 

Don't make the youngster think he is all alone with this as it could turn him off from writing up future hides if the ordeal is too much for him to handle! Ask if he's comfortable in doing it and assist accordingly! Make sure this part is also enjoyable for the little one.

 

It is fine to have this written up in his own words, but the words should be right (enforcing the use of proper spelling to show that spelling matters).

 

Good luck and I hope he has fun with this!

Edited by Rockin Roddy
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Goodness, half the cache pages I seen that are written by adults have spelling errors. I wouldn't worry too much about it, but I second the ideas to show him how to use a dictionary. I think the biggest thing is just getting him an awareness about correct spelling.

 

I never use a spellchecker, I AM my spell checker.

When I placed my first cache I had to edit the listing at least three times to fix spelling errors, for some reason they are much harder to spot on the listing page but show up much better on the cache page. ;)

 

As already stated, I think, let the words be his but proofread it with him to correct spelling errors.

I personally wouldn't worry about grammer as much as long as it isn't confusing to read, he is a child so let the page read as he wants.

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

Edited by flask
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As the parent of a 9 yr old who used to have a problem with spelling, I feel I should add my two cents. When my son was in second grade his teacher informed us that his spelling was great. He spelled everything exactly as he pronounced it and that was how children learned to spell correctly. The problem, she pointed out, was that he had a speech problem. After our initial visit to a speech therapist we were told our son could not lift his tongue or stick it out. A week later we had his tongue clipped and began speech therapy so he could learn to manipulate his tongue (a muscle he never learned to use) and learn to pronounce words correctly. He is now a very proficient writer and has written several books, including a few non-fiction titles. He would not be at this level if someone had not pointed out his problem. As parents, we sometimes overlook the obvious and consider some things as being part of our children’s character traits. I would recommend looking at your child’s writings to see if he is spelling some words, as he is saying them, if so, there may not be a spelling problem. And to reiterate what some of the above post tell you, a spell checker is not a spelling/grammar tutor.

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

You mean all those useless comma's I left out? That's intentional, commas reflect pauses in speach, and I did not intend there to be any pauses in those locations.

So why are you so adverse to Capitalization? Not capitalizing a persons name is considered an insult by many, unless like yours it is not capitalized anyway.

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

What's your opinion on the use of capitalization? ;)

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My children have their own account and have hidden 3 caches.

 

My oldest is 10 entering 5th grade. She does the write ups for the caches. She uses a spell checker and a dictionary. I do proofread both the cache descriptions and logs before they are submitted. In fact I almost proofread anything she types on the internet.

 

Here are the 3 caches they own:

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/nearest.asp...&submit4=Go

Edited by ParentsofSAM
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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

<snip>

 

What's your opinion on the use of capitalization? ;)

ee cummings complex maybe?

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Spell checker won't tell you if you have used the wrong word if it is spelt write right then it will skip it. It only cheques checks there their spelling not grammer. :laughing:

No, spell check won't--but grammar check will. Many (most?) writing software programs have the ability to look for grammar issues as well as spelling errors. The one I use even labels the type of problem, which helps me learn all the terminology. It doesn't help a beginning writer to be told they have used a "vague pronoun reference" if they don't know what that means, but my program highlights the "vague pronoun reference" in the writing.

 

Of course, no automated program is perfect; they all have their weaknesses. Mine has real problems with the proper use of the word "whom" in complex sentences, for example. It has cured me of my tendency to create sentences with comma splices, though.

 

It's not that I think we should hold young children responsible for perfect command of the language, but we should encourage them to continue to improve their skills. It isn't unreasonable to ask anyone publishing something on the Internet to run it past a spell checker, a grammar checker, and a proof reader.

Just make it clear that the goal is to create clear communication, so the reader will understand what is being said.

 

My best hint doesn't involve any technology. Simply reading the writing out loud before you finish it helps you find major errors you miss when you read them. Your brain fixes minor errors for you to make what you read understandable. It won't find spelling homonym errors, but it will point out phrases that just sound wrong.

 

(Unless, of course, you use the wrong form all the time, so it sounds right when it's really wrong. Such as saying "me and my friend" instead of "my friend and I" for example).

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

You mean all those useless comma's (no apostrophe) I left out? That's intentional, (use either period or semicolon) commas reflect pauses in speach(spelling), and I did not intend there to be any pauses in those locations.

So why are you so adverse to Capitalization? Not capitalizing a persons(use apostrophe) name is considered an insult by many, unless like yours it is not capitalized anyway.

 

i've covered this before, but i have a very severe hand tremor and a right/left coordination problem. it's very difficult for me to get it together to capitalize things.

 

in my real life i use only capital letters, but my writing has degenerated to the point that if something needs to be written, i have to get someone else to do it for me. next week i have to mail some packages. this means that i have to go to the post office to get the containers and then i have to pack them and then i have to make an appointment with a friend to write the addresses for me.

 

Youw and and xample of what it's like whaer i try to just typw and mayne toss in a capital or two,? k have trouble keeping my hands over the keys. tThey have medication fo r thata, and i take it. Do you wonder how bad it would be if i didns't take it?

 

now, on to your commas. yes, a comma can be used to denote a pause in speech, but has proper grammatical use. furthermore, i was not referring to the absence of any commas, but rather the glaring comma-splice at the beginning of your statement. i wouldn't have dreamed of picking apart your grammar had you not carried so much hubris with regard to being the only spellchecker you need.

 

edit: making corrections in punctuation and spelling.

Edited by flask
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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

You mean all those useless comma's (no apostrophe) I left out? That's intentional, (use either period or semicolon) commas reflect pauses in speach(spelling), and I did not intend there to be any pauses in those locations.

So why are you so adverse to Capitalization? Not capitalizing a persons(use apostrophe) name is considered an insult by many, unless like yours it is not capitalized anyway.

 

i've covered this before, but i have a very severe hand tremor and a right/left coordination problem. it's very difficult for me to get it together to capitalize things.

 

in my real life i use only capital letters, but my writing has degenerated to the point that if something needs to be written, i have to get someone else to do it for me. next week i have to mail some packages. this means that i have to go to the post office to get the containers and then i have to pack them and then i have to make an appointment with a friend to write the addresses for me.

 

Youw and and xample of what it's like whaer i try to just typw and mayne toss in a capital or two,? k have trouble keeping my hands over the keys. tThey have medication fo r thata, and i take it. Do you wonder how bad it would be if i didns't take it?

 

now, on to your commas. yes, a comma can be used to denote a pause in speech, but has proper grammatical use. furthermore, i was not referring to the absence of any commas, but rather the glaring comma-splice at the beginning of your statement. i wouldn't have dreamed of picking apart your grammar had you not carried so much hubris with regard to being the only spellchecker you need.

 

edit: making corrections in punctuation and spelling.

 

You're breaking my heart, I make a simple post to give advice and you want to play grammer cop.

Never reply to me again flask, I'm finished with you. I find your reply inexcusable.

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

What's your opinion on the use of capitalization? :laughing:

You read my mind...

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

You mean all those useless comma's (no apostrophe) I left out? That's intentional, (use either period or semicolon) commas reflect pauses in speach(spelling), and I did not intend there to be any pauses in those locations.

So why are you so adverse to Capitalization? Not capitalizing a persons(use apostrophe) name is considered an insult by many, unless like yours it is not capitalized anyway.

 

i've covered this before, but i have a very severe hand tremor and a right/left coordination problem. it's very difficult for me to get it together to capitalize things.

 

in my real life i use only capital letters, but my writing has degenerated to the point that if something needs to be written, i have to get someone else to do it for me. next week i have to mail some packages. this means that i have to go to the post office to get the containers and then i have to pack them and then i have to make an appointment with a friend to write the addresses for me.

 

Youw and and xample of what it's like whaer i try to just typw and mayne toss in a capital or two,? k have trouble keeping my hands over the keys. tThey have medication fo r thata, and i take it. Do you wonder how bad it would be if i didns't take it?

 

now, on to your commas. yes, a comma can be used to denote a pause in speech, but has proper grammatical use. furthermore, i was not referring to the absence of any commas, but rather the glaring comma-splice at the beginning of your statement. i wouldn't have dreamed of picking apart your grammar had you not carried so much hubris with regard to being the only spellchecker you need.

 

edit: making corrections in punctuation and spelling.

 

You're breaking my heart, I make a simple post to give advice and you want to play grammer cop.

Never reply to me again flask, I'm finished with you. I find your reply inexcusable.

 

sorry. can't resist. your command is useless against me. you must use your "ignore" superpower, but then you won't know if i'm talking about you. it sounds so dramatic, so gothic: "never reply to me again". that just sounds like a challenge.

 

please don't lie to me; you and i and anyone who reads along knows that was not friendly advice. you were caught in it and now if you backpedal any harder, you'll break an ankle.

 

do you love slapstick? i do.

 

inexcusable? you're writing for comic effect, right? somehow i think you're not, but i wish you were. weren't you the one who who made a point to say that the only spellchecker you needed was you? that's just beggin'. beggin'.

 

it's usually considered poor form to pick on people's spelling and grammar, but when it's made the topic, it's fair game. grammar, spelling, and punctuation are hobbies of mine.

 

thanks for playing.

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As the parent of a 9 yr old who used to have a problem with spelling, I feel I should add my two cents. When my son was in second grade his teacher informed us that his spelling was great. He spelled everything exactly as he pronounced it and that was how children learned to spell correctly. The problem, she pointed out, was that he had a speech problem. After our initial visit to a speech therapist we were told our son could not lift his tongue or stick it out. A week later we had his tongue clipped and began speech therapy so he could learn to manipulate his tongue (a muscle he never learned to use) and learn to pronounce words correctly. He is now a very proficient writer and has written several books, including a few non-fiction titles. He would not be at this level if someone had not pointed out his problem. As parents, we sometimes overlook the obvious and consider some things as being part of our children’s character traits. I would recommend looking at your child’s writings to see if he is spelling some words, as he is saying them, if so, there may not be a spelling problem. And to reiterate what some of the above post tell you, a spell checker is not a spelling/grammar tutor.

Thank you for the tips. I haven't noticed anything via speech or writing suggesting anything but it is always wise to be aware. I will be more careful now.

 

So far he has been excellent in spelling. He went through the first half of the year last year without missing one spelling word on his tests.

 

We have a local cacher who is a teen and his caches are very annoying partly because the hides are dumb and partly because his spelling is wrong.

 

We will keep the info in mind. My idea was that over time he would edit and fix any mistakes.

 

Thanks for all of your help and ideas!

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And I thought the topic was about a 9 yr old hiding a cache! :laughing:

 

Slow down kids, take a breath! It's all good...

 

i have a problem with attention span, and a kind of "discovery" approach to living. one thing leads to another and nothing is ever off topic because things morph.

 

anyway, i really do recommend proofreading together. maybe using a spellchecker in conjuction with checking live. if you do it together, you get to pass on knowledge about how to use the skills.

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i'm a fairly decent speller. i'm also good with grammar (did you ever end up in a relationship with someone because you shared a love of grammar?), and i understand how to use reflexive pronouns. i also check my posts and logs for agreement of number and tense.

 

i know it's against a number of stylebooks, but i often tell stories in the present tense instead of the past.

 

my pet peeve is people who hear common expressions, don't really understand them and therefore don't actually know the words. then they use the expression, using the words they imagine to be correct. and nu-cu-lar? don't get me started.

 

i rarely use spellchecker in word processing, but if i'm not certain of a spelling, i use dictionary.com. it is more thorough and current than any dictionary in my house and easier to use, too. it isn't computers that are making us stupider.

 

likewise, if i am uncertain of a grammatical construct or an idiom, i look them up.

 

and i'm sorry, captain blackbeard. you may be you own spellchecker, but who checks your punctuation?

 

You mean all those useless comma's (no apostrophe) I left out? That's intentional, (use either period or semicolon) commas reflect pauses in speach(spelling), and I did not intend there to be any pauses in those locations.

So why are you so adverse to Capitalization? Not capitalizing a persons(use apostrophe) name is considered an insult by many, unless like yours it is not capitalized anyway.

 

i've covered this before, but i have a very severe hand tremor and a right/left coordination problem. it's very difficult for me to get it together to capitalize things.

 

in my real life i use only capital letters, but my writing has degenerated to the point that if something needs to be written, i have to get someone else to do it for me. next week i have to mail some packages. this means that i have to go to the post office to get the containers and then i have to pack them and then i have to make an appointment with a friend to write the addresses for me.

 

Youw and and xample of what it's like whaer i try to just typw and mayne toss in a capital or two,? k have trouble keeping my hands over the keys. tThey have medication fo r thata, and i take it. Do you wonder how bad it would be if i didns't take it?

 

now, on to your commas. yes, a comma can be used to denote a pause in speech, but has proper grammatical use. furthermore, i was not referring to the absence of any commas, but rather the glaring comma-splice at the beginning of your statement. i wouldn't have dreamed of picking apart your grammar had you not carried so much hubris with regard to being the only spellchecker you need.

 

edit: making corrections in punctuation and spelling.

 

You're breaking my heart, I make a simple post to give advice and you want to play grammer cop.

Never reply to me again flask, I'm finished with you. I find your reply inexcusable.

 

sorry. can't resist. your command is useless against me. you must use your "ignore" superpower, but then you won't know if i'm talking about you. it sounds so dramatic, so gothic: "never reply to me again". that just sounds like a challenge.

 

please don't lie to me; you and i and anyone who reads along knows that was not friendly advice. you were caught in it and now if you backpedal any harder, you'll break an ankle.

 

do you love slapstick? i do.

 

inexcusable? you're writing for comic effect, right? somehow i think you're not, but i wish you were. weren't you the one who who made a point to say that the only spellchecker you needed was you? that's just beggin'. beggin'.

 

it's usually considered poor form to pick on people's spelling and grammar, but when it's made the topic, it's fair game. grammar, spelling, and punctuation are hobbies of mine.

 

thanks for playing.

 

What are you smoking? My advice, which you choose to attack me over was this:

 

I never use a spellchecker, I AM my spell checker.

When I placed my first cache I had to edit the listing at least three times to fix spelling errors, for some reason they are much harder to spot on the listing page but show up much better on the cache page.

 

As already stated, I think, let the words be his but proofread it with him to correct spelling errors.

I personally wouldn't worry about grammer as much as long as it isn't confusing to read, he is a child so let the page read as he wants.

 

How was that not friendly advice, and where did I say anything from which I should backpedal?

I gave advice and you launch a personal attack against me, and now you accuse me of lying. THe only reason you aren''t on my ignore list is because I can't find the ignore button, if someone will please point it out to me I will use it.

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I PERSONALLY would prefer that the description was proofread. If I read it, I might go into convulsions if there were too many errors. But then, there's a reason I'm called the word nerd. :laughing:

 

Kudos to your son for his soon-to-be first cache. I think that's great that he has an interested. By the time he's 18, he'll probably have, like, 4 million finds and 20,000 hides.

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Maybe recommend to him to run it through Microsoft Word, or a similar program, to make sure the spelling is right. I wouldn't worry about it too much though, if it's a word or two that gets missed then oh well. But for learning's sake teach him how to use a spell checker and how to fix his errors, it will come in handy when he starts to type up reports and essays.

 

As a technology teacher, I applaud the above response. We have been teaching our first and second graders how to recognize the squiggly red underlines under words that *might* be misspelled. Since your son is nine, he's certainly capable, with your supervision, of doing this. I like that you are encouraging him to be independent while also making it clear that you are watching over his shoulder. Too many kids online today are doing a lot without their parents' knowledge.

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i hated the dictionairy in school. Even with it, I was the poorest speller in the class. And without it, ferget about it.

 

Then again, I was learning two languages, although really, I was learning 6. 3 variants of English and 3 of French. "Official" French, Canadian French, Quebecquois French, Canadian, American and British English. Each one of them have different ways of spelling or meaning the same thing. And with some words, the difference might be the addition or substraction of 1 letter. Then there's word conjugations - don't get me started about the future past participle of being (suis/etre). *rips hair out.* Not having the accent right meant a spelling error, not having it on the right vowel according to the teacher, augh!!!

 

Spellcheckers help. A lot.

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Gosh, I'm kind of "old school" on kids who haven't learned how to spell yet learning to depend on a spell checker. Maybe it's just me, but I think the kids should learn without that then utilize a spell checker to help keep them in line later on after they've been exposed to everybody else's poor spelling. :laughing:

 

I have an adult friend who depends on a spell checker and he is constantly writing about our "grope" instead of our "group." There seems to be a lot of "privet" things as opposed to "private" things. There's much too much to list it all, but suffice to say when questioned he will say "I used spell check." Just the other day in person (privately), I asked him how to spell "group." He answered "g-r-o-p-e." The spell checking feature is being misused and reinforcing the WRONG spellings in his mind.

 

I can't help but wonder how using a spelling checker without supersion will do to a younger person who is just learning to spell.

 

To keep it on topic, I like the idea of your son rolling up his sleeves and getting dirty, so to speak, by delving in to writing up the page on his own. I would take that opportunity to review it with him and use it as a teaching tool to help him learn correctly! What better way to make such a thing enjoyable than to learn spelling while having fun with a game!!

As a teacher, I'm willing to bet your friend who struggles with spelling is dyslexic or perhaps has another undiagnosed learning disability. Or he does not read much. (Maybe both.) I don't say this to be cruel or insulting. I have first and second graders who can pick out the correct word (usually) from a list of options, and I have middle school students who don't even know when they're spelling words incorrectly, even with the red underlines in Word. Those kids are my dyslexic ones.

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have two boys 8 1/2 & 7. we love geocaching and I decided i wanted them to come up with their 'own' geocache & develop themselves. all i did was pick a local park that had many possible sites & had a few cache containers for them to pick from. We went to the park, they looked, found a spot, we got a waypoint, they came up with the name, theme (hot wheels, of course!), they supplied initial swag and we wrote up the description together. I think it came out really good & it was a good learning experience all the way around. here is the cache they made: Hold on Tight Geocache GC13287 :D

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