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When I hid this cache, the area was nice.


Kit Fox
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Have you ever hidden a cache in a scenic locale, and read everyone's positive log, until the most recent log. The last cacher describes your cache's location as being a dumper's paradise. Puzzled, you investigate and learn your once pristine spot is now dumping ground.

 

This happened to me several times, and two of the spots were in the National Forest. Sometimes a trash bag is not enough to clean up the trash. Please share your stories of cache sites transformed by (nature, or human beings.)

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I recently learned that there was a forest fire near on of my caches called Alternate Parking. Luckily, it was in a big clearing, so the whole forest didn't go up. The place where my cache is hidden is about 50 feet from the fire. I was out there recently and could still see the evidence of the fire, although the Boy Scouts did a good job clearing it.

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I have a cache I named "Shady Rest." It was in a very shady oak grove at the base of dense, chapparral-covered hills.

 

Last summer a fire raged through the area. Fortunately, the oak trees were saved, but the hills behind them are completely barren now and the area does not look like the same place . . . :o

You need to rename that cache to "Sunny Rest." :(
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I just today archived a multi-cache that I hid in Dec 2003. At that time the vegetation was minimal. Now? Poison ivy everywhere. I was able to find two other scenic spots without the poisonous plants and the new cache is just a reviewer approval away.

Edited by Theseus
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I hid a cache in a secluded glade with a tiny spring run and sump. Lovely with ferns and orchids in the oaks. About 2 weeks after the cache was published, the local water management district bulldozed a road in and cleared a big area to sink a test well. Sure changed the feel of the spot. I archived my hide, though it was untouched by the activity.

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One cache (not mine) was hidden at a scenic wooded spot, basically in the middle of nowhere. The last person to find it reported that a road was built and a house was going up within feet of the cache. In fact a Navicache that was hidden 50 feet away was lost to the bulldozer.

 

I had one in a roadside pullout with a popular spring where people stop to fill their water bottles. Sometimes it was a nice spt and sometimes people would complain that it was a dumping ground. Apparently some locals used it as a dump and others cleaned it up periodically.

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One cache (not mine) was hidden at a scenic wooded spot, basically in the middle of nowhere. The last person to find it reported that a road was built and a house was going up within feet of the cache. In fact a Navicache that was hidden 50 feet away was lost to the bulldozer.

 

Some Cacher really liked the spot, and bought the land?

Edited by WRITE SHOP ROBERT
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When we hid our second cache, Munchkins Muggle Proof Cache, it was hidden in a nice patch of woods attached to a county park. Someone decided to park a Walmart on top of it. When I heard about the ground clearing, I rushed out there to discover 75% of the woods were literally gone. Nothing left but bulldozer tracks in sand. The edge of the (then current) clearing was literally 2' from my ammo can. Once they had somewhat of a DMZ established, I re-hid it in the woods that weren't knocked down in the name of "progress".

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When we hid our second cache, Munchkins Muggle Proof Cache, it was hidden in a nice patch of woods attached to a county park. Someone decided to park a Walmart on top of it. When I heard about the ground clearing, I rushed out there to discover 75% of the woods were literally gone. Nothing left but bulldozer tracks in sand. The edge of the (then current) clearing was literally 2' from my ammo can. Once they had somewhat of a DMZ established, I re-hid it in the woods that weren't knocked down in the name of "progress".

 

Now you just remember that parking lots are important too. Where else would all of the LPC's get hidden?

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I have had three lost to transformation of an area.

 

One lasted for almost 5 years - it was hidden about 3/4 a mile down a nice walking path and about 75 feet off trail in a clump of trees with a few fallen trees nearby. I got a lot of compliments on the hide location and only checked on it annually as it was well hidden and had no problems. Then suddenly I started getting odd logs about how exposed the cache was. Then a log about the new road. Then a log about why an ammo can was in the only tree around. When I went to visit, I found that contruction had started on a new housing subdivision and the only tree left in the clump was the one where the cache was hiodden in a fork of the tree. All the area with 50feet had been bulldozed away and a crude gravel road was right next to it. Sigh, I closed it.

 

Another was just over 5 years old, hidden under a Russian Olive Tree in a park/ natural area in town. A nice hide and perfect spot for a cache. Suddenly I got an odd log about the cache being found in a pit of saw dust. Then a log about the cache just lying on the open ground. Went to check and found that all trees within 75 feet had been cut down and all that was left was a few pits of saw dust. The workers had thoughtfully signed the log and "re-hidden" it.

 

The third, was near a roadside turnout on a slow sloping hill. The state decided to increase the size of the turnout and bulldozed the hill back about 100 feet. Never saw that one again. Replaced it with a new cache further up the hill.

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Have you ever hidden a cache in a scenic locale, and read everyone's positive log, until the most recent log. The last cacher describes your cache's location as being a dumper's paradise. Puzzled, you investigate and learn your once pristine spot is now dumping ground.

 

This happened to me several times, and two of the spots were in the National Forest. Sometimes a trash bag is not enough to clean up the trash. Please share your stories of cache sites transformed by (nature, or human beings.)

Your so called back-country caches aren't back enough. Put them far enough away from parking and the party crowd will leave them alone.

 

Actually, when I saw you archive that cache, I didn't know exactly where it was and though perhaps it was in an area where developers were putting in new roads or housing. Kit Fox lives in one of the fastest growing areas in So. California (at least before the housing bubble burst) I've seen several caches, including some his, change from remote desert caches to park and grabs as development spreads out. I suspect this has a secondary effect as the teenagers in the area look for some place to drink beer or smoke cigarettes and find some "remote" canyon that is no longer so remote to turn into a party spot. And anyplace that can be reached by a dirt road gets turned into a dump. Sorry about your cache Bill.

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cache location can go from scenic to junk-filled. I wonder why more cachers don't CITO

 

I have seen cachers transform an area by CITOing the trash out little by little. But many of the transformations mentioned on this thread have been wrought by new road work, or construction.

 

I had a run going for a while, if you wanted an area bulldozed, just invite IK to drop an ammo can. It actually happened to three consecutive spots. The one I mentioned a couple of posts up, another in the same forest, where the guy dozing the forest road just pullled off and randomly 'dozed an extra 100 feet south of the road, and AGAIN when forestry 'dozed a fire break working a wild fire. Salvaged 2 of 3 ammo cans.

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There is an evil multi in south denver that is an hours drive for me. I attempted it once and got to the last stage which was in an awesome wetlands area. Wildlife was everywhere, a creek, nothing around at all. I DNF it and then cam back 3 months later to try again and I didn't even recognize the area. I checked the coords I had for the final and it put me under a brand new 4-lane traffic bridge. I couldn't believe it...

The owner verified it and the final had to be moved.

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It seems strange to me that a cache location can go from scenic to junk-filled. I wonder why more cachers don't CITO.

I'll have to search for a picture I took a few years ago. In a canyon not too far from where I live, in which there are several caches, there is a sign along the graded road that says "No Dumping." Next to the sign was a stove, a sofa, and other trash the person didn't want to take to the dump because of the $35.00 dump fee . . . ;)

 

So CITO is ofen not possible for the areas in rural areas that get transformed by idiots . . . :P

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Have you ever hidden a cache in a scenic locale, and read everyone's positive log, until the most recent log. The last cacher describes your cache's location as being a dumper's paradise. Puzzled, you investigate and learn your once pristine spot is now dumping ground.

 

This happened to me several times, and two of the spots were in the National Forest. Sometimes a trash bag is not enough to clean up the trash. Please share your stories of cache sites transformed by (nature, or human beings.)

Your so called back-country caches aren't back enough. Put them far enough away from parking and the party crowd will leave them alone.

 

Actually, when I saw you archive that cache, I didn't know exactly where it was and though perhaps it was in an area where developers were putting in new roads or housing. Kit Fox lives in one of the fastest growing areas in So. California (at least before the housing bubble burst) I've seen several caches, including some his, change from remote desert caches to park and grabs as development spreads out. I suspect this has a secondary effect as the teenagers in the area look for some place to drink beer or smoke cigarettes and find some "remote" canyon that is no longer so remote to turn into a party spot. And anyplace that can be reached by a dirt road gets turned into a dump. Sorry about your cache Bill.

 

Cache in question Mount Emma Trail #1

 

My "real backcountry caches" aren't in dumping spots. The oddest thing I ever found was a car tire complete with rim, on top of the mountain where I hid "Eisen-Faust." Since there are no roads near this spot, I can only imagine how a tire ended up here. :P

The location has turned into a nice party spot, because it's just outside of town, and affords a nice view of the city lights at night.

 

 

It seems strange to me that a cache location can go from scenic to junk-filled. I wonder why more cachers don't CITO.

 

For small trash like paper, water bottles, etc, a plastic bag is sufficient. What i'm referring to is big items like couches, engines, or or other large debris (Concrete, wood, etc.)

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