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bumblingbs
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I really want people to read the cache page. A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides, but there is history, a story, a reason for them being there, they are not just randomly placed. Please find out why.

 

If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far. It was the experience of the trail that I was wanting you to have. The plastic box at the end was just a bonus, it wasn't the important part. You don't have to find 50 of them today, not if you have enjoyed the view, noticed the little purple flowers growing over there, learned a bit about something...please?

 

Thank you.

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I couldn't agree more. A lot of time a research goes into setting a new cache.

 

I have had people fall in water, get attacked by a bull, get stung and bitten, and all because they ignored my parking co-ords and route, then they have the cheek to complain about the location of the cache in their remarks!

 

However, it's just a game, so if they want to do it their way, so be it!

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I'm kind of in the same boat here... I'm torn between placing cache spew and really thinking about my hides. All in all I try to place my caches in places people wouldn't otherwise go to or discover on their own. Sometimes there is a story involved. Little parks that have gone into disrepair, new parks no one may not know about or areas with a view. I have one cache that requires a very short(.25 mi), somewhat steep (~250ft elevation gain) hike, that has not been found in about 6 weeks. All the die hard cachers in the area have snagged it, but otherwise it sits without anyone making an effort. When I placed it, it took less than 15 mins to hike up to it and since it's a regular sized cache, I thought it'd be popular.. but nope, the popular ones are the ones that you can pretty much drive up to and make the 2 minute find.. though the cache with the decoy has been giving a few people fits with 75% of them making the decoy find first.. I want to make an effort and place some caches in the open space area around the one that requires a hike, but I'm reluctant if no one wants to hunt it/them..

Edited by sargenv
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Well said! It's about the journey, not the numbers. Numbers are fun too, but in proportion to the enjoyment of the walk, the numbers mean very little. I start to get cranky if P pup (my partner and usually the driver of the jeep), takes us to 2 or more park n' grabs in a row. Moxie likes the hikes best too! :D

 

A lot of people just grab the coords and go, especially if they're on a FTF run, but often, the cache page provides either important information, or at least information that adds to the enjoyment of the cache. Often, you would really miss out on something the cache owner wants to share if you can't take the time to read the page. :lol:

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If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far.
One way to deal with this is to make it a multi that forces people to take the route you want them to.

 

Or place a second cache along the way to entice them to use that route.

 

But in the end, people are in this sport for different reasons. Some just want that next smiley and don't give a clam's patootie about your cache page, the history surrounding the cache location or the pretty view. They want to sign the logbook and get to the next cache. There is nothing you can do or say to make them change that.

Edited by briansnat
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If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far.
One way to deal with this is to make it a multi that forces people to take the route you want them to.

 

Or place a second cache along the way to entice them to use that route.

 

But in the end, people are in this sport for different reasons. Some just want that next smiley and don't give a clam's patootie about your cache page, the history surrounding the cache location or the pretty view. They want to sign the logbook and get to the next cache. There is nothing you can do or say to make them change that.

 

You're right. I don't want to force people to find a geocache as intended, I want to enlighten them, but that's probably just impossible. There's a certain percentage of cachers who get a rush from getting the numbers, and, while I don't understand it I can respect it. They will skip my better caches, though, because they can't be done in 15 minutes. I'm talking more to regular cacher person here.

 

What I really want to know from you, though, is what is a clam's patootie, and do you really hate eggplant.

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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I sometimes think the greatness is in the story. I spend hours at the Historical Society, and I want to share what I've found. The spot that the story takes me to does not always lend itself to a great hide. We don't have mountains right here, which I know you would prefer, but I'm being as creative as I can with what I've got.

 

Don't be telling me that shortcutting a local trail to get to my cache is adding excitement to it. It's shortcutting. And, XOXO Criminal. I love you.

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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I sometimes think the greatness is in the story. I spend hours at the Historical Society, and I want to share what I've found. The spot that the story takes me to does not always lend itself to a great hide. We don't have mountains right here, which I know you would prefer, but I'm being as creative as I can with what I've got.

 

Don't be telling me that shortcutting a local trail to get to my cache is adding excitement to it. It's shortcutting. And, XOXO Criminal. I love you.

I love reading the story behind a great cache. Ring of Fire comes immediately to mind as a good example. My point, though subtle, was that if the OP knows their caches are mediocre, maybe they should re-think their hides.

 

EDIT: BTW, I've done some BB caches, and I never thought any of them were mediocre.

Edited by Criminal
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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I've been thinking about it, and the WSGA group is coming here in August, and if I pulled all of my caches that were not great hides, and all the other caches in town that were not great caches, there would be nothing left. I've only seen one or two great caches in my geo days, and I've never hidden one. Mt. Townsend was not. But, it was a great destination!

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It's not always about the numbers or a quick grab, for some of us it is about finding a way to do a cache within our limitations.

 

I have limited mobility, and the distance I can hike is getting shorter all the time. I often will try to find a way I can do caches that are at the limit of, or beyond what I can do without having to endure pain for a couple nights after the cache.

 

That being said, if I do find a shorter way, I usually won't say anything about it unless the cache owner asks for that info.

 

I have wondered though if there was anyway to share the easier route with those that would need it, without spoiling it for those that don't. I am sure many of those who give you a shorter route are just going for the numbers, but some may have other needs.

 

I would rather be able to enjoy part of your cache experience then none of it.

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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I've been thinking about it, and the WSGA group is coming here in August, and if I pulled all of my caches that were not great hides, and all the other caches in town that were not great caches, there would be nothing left. I've only seen one or two great caches in my geo days, and I've never hidden one. Mt. Townsend was not. But, it was a great destination!

That is a great cache!

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Criminal, edited to say you've done some of my caches and they weren't horrible? Whee! I always go out with your signature item hanging from my backpack, we can't fight, unless you want to.

 

I guess I have a different category for great caches. You need location, a great hide, a great cache page, a real challenge. Those conditions are not available everywhere, you work with what you have.

 

I don't have anything thrown into a parking lot, but those are OK when I'm out with my 80 year old mom.

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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I've been thinking about it, and the WSGA group is coming here in August, and if I pulled all of my caches that were not great hides, and all the other caches in town that were not great caches, there would be nothing left. I've only seen one or two great caches in my geo days, and I've never hidden one. Mt. Townsend was not. But, it was a great destination!

That is a great cache!

 

No, that is not a great cache, it is a terrible cache in a great spot.

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All your caches appear to finders is coords,hint, and difficulty.Think I'm lying?

 

Read on.

 

It's sad,but true.

And if the info in the description is so important that you must read for safety's sake, then you should not have a cache there. At least thats what i learned.

I disagree.I learned that it's pointless to type up a good cache,with simple logging/finding instructions,or a good story to go with the cache.If you don't wish to read the cache because there may be simple safety instructions noted on said cache page,then perhaphs the cache isn't for you.

 

We all want well placed/well thought out cache hides,but no one wants to take the time to read said page.Load and go is the name of the game.

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All your caches appear to finders is coords,hint, and difficulty.Think I'm lying?

 

Read on.

 

It's sad,but true.

And if the info in the description is so important that you must read for safety's sake, then you should not have a cache there. At least thats what i learned.

I disagree.I learned that it's pointless to type up a good cache,with simple logging/finding instructions,or a good story to go with the cache.If you don't wish to read the cache because there may be simple safety instructions noted on said cache page,then perhaphs the cache isn't for you.

 

We all want well placed/well thought out cache hides,but no one wants to take the time to read said page.Load and go is the name of the game.

 

I have two caches I really like - they are both very easy, but have beautiful clifftop views. It scares me, that people don't read the cache pages, because there are no fences or barriers at the top, and if you let your child run ahead of you....

 

I've considered archiving them, but they are very nice if done safely.

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I really want people to read the cache page. A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides, but there is history, a story, a reason for them being there, they are not just randomly placed. Please find out why.

 

If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far. It was the experience of the trail that I was wanting you to have. The plastic box at the end was just a bonus, it wasn't the important part. You don't have to find 50 of them today, not if you have enjoyed the view, noticed the little purple flowers growing over there, learned a bit about something...please?

 

Thank you.

The true art is setting up your cache such that it forces the finders to have the experience you intended.

Finders will do anything for a find, but they won't do anything more than they need to.

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All your caches appear to finders is coords,hint, and difficulty.Think I'm lying?

 

Read on.

 

It's sad,but true.

And if the info in the description is so important that you must read for safety's sake, then you should not have a cache there. At least thats what i learned.

I disagree.I learned that it's pointless to type up a good cache,with simple logging/finding instructions,or a good story to go with the cache.If you don't wish to read the cache because there may be simple safety instructions noted on said cache page,then perhaphs the cache isn't for you.

 

We all want well placed/well thought out cache hides,but no one wants to take the time to read said page.Load and go is the name of the game.

 

I have two caches I really like - they are both very easy, but have beautiful clifftop views. It scares me, that people don't read the cache pages, because there are no fences or barriers at the top, and if you let your child run ahead of you....

 

I've considered archiving them, but they are very nice if done safely.

Don't.Then you're giving into the same crowd that dosen't read the directions when they buy a new GPS or exercise bike.Post a warning on the page.If folks choose not to read your cache page,then I guess they don't need to do your cache.

 

Real men don't need instructions or warnings.

 

(This post was completely in general terms and not directed at any paticular cacher).

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All your caches appear to finders is coords,hint, and difficulty.Think I'm lying?

 

Read on.

 

It's sad,but true.

While you're reading the referenced thread, be sure to review post # 16, which clearly indicates that Riffsters always read the whole page of every cache we hunt. Contrary to the tone of that particular thread, I don't know a single cacher personally who doesn't read the cache pages. I was quite surprised to see the majority of the posts indicating the opposite.

 

And if the info in the description is so important that you must read for safety's sake, then you should not have a cache there.

I figure, if someone chooses not to read my cache page, and they are removed from the gene pool as a result, the fault is their's, not mine.

 

I have two caches I really like - they are both very easy, but have beautiful clifftop views. It scares me, that people don't read the cache pages, because there are no fences or barriers at the top, and if you let your child run ahead of you....

That's why Gaia made Darwinism. :lol:

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All your caches appear to finders is coords,hint, and difficulty.Think I'm lying?

 

Read on.

 

It's sad,but true.

While you're reading the referenced thread, be sure to review post # 16, which clearly indicates that Riffsters always read the whole page of every cache we hunt. Contrary to the tone of that particular thread, I don't know a single cacher personally who doesn't read the cache pages. I was quite surprised to see the majority of the posts indicating the opposite.

 

Ditto.

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Criminal, edited to say you've done some of my caches and they weren't horrible? Whee! I always go out with your signature item hanging from my backpack, we can't fight, unless you want to.

 

I guess I have a different category for great caches. You need location, a great hide, a great cache page, a real challenge. Those conditions are not available everywhere, you work with what you have.

 

I don't have anything thrown into a parking lot, but those are OK when I'm out with my 80 year old mom.

When I read 'cache' I think of the entire experience, not just the box itself. Mt Townsend is a great cache because it's a great spot with great views and a great hike getting there. Alone or in a group, you will have fun. You couldn’t make it greater unless you wait for me in the parking lot with cold beer, and that might be asking a bit much. :lol:

 

Art of Tacoma Locomotive by Team Noltex is a great cache too, and it's a micro in the city.

 

I think you’re being too hard on yourself. The paradigm has shifted; we used to hunt for caches in remarkable locations, one in a day was normal and never disappointing. Now the emphasis seems to be on the sheer number of caches you can string together along a route and the ‘location’ is more of an afterthought. People are hiding magnetic micros on slimy dumpsters behind restaurants, on guardrails, or stuffed into the fence near the outhouse; and not as a joke! Why? Who knows. Some want to the numbers (hides) and some want to feed the number whores. It’s doesn’t bother me that they do, nor do I wish they were banned, because I don’t hunt for them. I think they’re missing out on the best part of geocaching, it’s their loss.

 

Write on, some people will read the page, some will not. There’s little you can do about it though, unless you hide critical clues within the text.

 

You’re playing the old way. I think that’s a good thing.

Edited by Criminal
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I guess that I do a lot of things differently than other cachers. I got into this sport because I WANTED to be led to areas and vistas I would never have known were there. I go to enjoy the walk, hike or whatever it takes to get me to the cache. I also do it a lot more slowly that others because I'm always finding something interesting to look at on the way.

I also love the history related caches. I have done a couple of multi caches that took me on a history trip around the county where I have lived for over 10 years. I found out things about this county that I never heard of. They are now in my top 10 favorites.

I have only placed one cache, but it takes the finder to an area that they would never go to, unless it was for the cache. I've gotten a lot of compliments on it. I have a couple more ready to go, that I plan on putting on a little used trail in a nearby park that has some fantastic views of the river valley. I hope they are as well received.

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A little presumptious, don't you think? It's an all-about-me world out there and I can apply it to your complaining and to the seekers of your caches.

 

Consider cachers that do pocket query dumps and literally do unplanned drivebys seeking out caches near their route...

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Consider cachers that do pocket query dumps and literally do unplanned drivebys seeking out caches near their route...

So long as their "dump" also goes into their PDA, and they read the cache page, Kewl! If not, maybe the next cacher can waymark their corpse. :lol:

Question: Is there a Waymarking catagory for places where stupid people get killed because they were doing something stupid?

I could add a lot of waypoints to it. :D

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If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far. It was the experience of the trail that I was wanting you to have.

 

I usually take the trail on the way back out after I've had this adventure on the way to the cache:

 

I have had people fall in water, get attacked by a bull, get stung and bitten, and all because they ignored my parking co-ords and route...
Edited by Team Sagefox
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A little presumptious, don't you think? It's an all-about-me world out there and I can apply it to your complaining and to the seekers of your caches.

 

Consider cachers that do pocket query dumps and literally do unplanned drivebys seeking out caches near their route...

 

Is it me you're calling presumptious? I don't know, I may be. I'm afraid that I AM an old fashioned cacher, I don't know anything other than to print out the cache page and read it, and when the numbers on my GPSr are getting closer, I'm getting closer. Obviously, I'm just not keeping up with the times.

 

But if you do, say, this cache, it's just an easy micro. If you haven't read the cache page, you've missed the point.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...fc-820ec86974fd

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I really want people to read the cache page. A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides, but there is history, a story, a reason for them being there, they are not just randomly placed. Please find out why.

 

If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far. It was the experience of the trail that I was wanting you to have. The plastic box at the end was just a bonus, it wasn't the important part. You don't have to find 50 of them today, not if you have enjoyed the view, noticed the little purple flowers growing over there, learned a bit about something...please?

 

Thank you.

 

I certainly understand where you're coming from. On my last cache I used a little guilt in the description:

 

"The premise behind this hide is to show you this trail, a rather large glacial erratic and the scenic vistas along the way. I was lucky enough to observe a red tailed hawk riding the thermals while looking down upon him. You would be cheating yourself of fantastic scenery and quite a hike by taking another approach."

 

Working pretty good so far.

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I bought the premium membership in part to support the site but also because of the extra info in the database the pocket query downloads.

 

I have gsak, which I'll register, to look at the database. I'll pick a center point and look at the subset of caches by distance. I'll go down the list cach by cache looking at the description in the bottom of the split screen. I'm looking for an interesting place or an interesting hide (even if a mundane place).

 

I check the box of the cache line in the upper pane if the cache looks interesting. These are the only cache waypoints that get loaded on the gpsr.

 

We'll be traveling up to mid Florida later this summer. Was checking caches in the area and noticed a lot of png listings. It is a retirement area so I can see that as being beneficial to many people. However, was able to find caches that might not be real difficult but were in nice parks, had views or historic significance.

 

So for those of you who put some thought beyond the swag in the box, keep up the good work. It sounds like a lot of us appreciate it, my family sure does!

 

Good hunting,

 

Jim

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A lot of my caches are very mediocre hides...

Finding a better route to the cache may be the finder trying to add some excitement to your cache. Have you considered hiding only great caches?

 

I've been thinking about it, and the WSGA group is coming here in August, and if I pulled all of my caches that were not great hides, and all the other caches in town that were not great caches, there would be nothing left. I've only seen one or two great caches in my geo days, and I've never hidden one. Mt. Townsend was not. But, it was a great destination!

That is a great cache!

 

No, that is not a great cache, it is a terrible cache in a great spot.

 

A great spot makes it a great cache. It's all about the location with me. A film canister on the rim of the Grand Canyon would be an awesome hide. An incredibly well camoflaged ammo box stocked with expensive electronic equipment in a Walmart parking lot would be mediocre to me.

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A little presumptious, don't you think? It's an all-about-me world out there and I can apply it to your complaining and to the seekers of your caches.

 

Consider cachers that do pocket query dumps and literally do unplanned drivebys seeking out caches near their route...

 

Is it me you're calling presumptious? I don't know, I may be. I'm afraid that I AM an old fashioned cacher, I don't know anything other than to print out the cache page and read it, and when the numbers on my GPSr are getting closer, I'm getting closer. Obviously, I'm just not keeping up with the times.

 

But if you do, say, this cache, it's just an easy micro. If you haven't read the cache page, you've missed the point.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...fc-820ec86974fd

It doesn't matter.Everyone wants to load and go nowadays.This can be applied to most anything now,so it's not surprise it's found it's way to Geocaching.

If they don't read the cache page and miss the point it's the finder's problem,not yours.You took the time and effort to put the cache out for them.I guess they should put more hides out they like and find their own caches if yours are 'lame' by their standards.

 

Consider this-Maybe all caches aren't made for load and gos....OMG they're not???Imadgine that.Perhpahs you should see that side.Not everyone caches paperless.God forbid someone should take time to read the cache page.Oddly enough those are the same cachers whining on the forum about numbers and quality caches.

Edited by vtmtnman
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I don't know "load and go" , as I've said, I don't do it. I'm sorry if it has come to that.

I made the term up.It reffers to loading your PDA/GPS with the vitals of the cache and going to the cache.The second paragraph was to the other poster,not you.I don't cache this way either,and since I started learning about all of this non cache page reading,I may never start.

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I read some pages before I do them but that's mainly when they come up in notification emails and I might not actually hunt the cache until much later. I never load extra WPs for parking etc. Figuring things out is all part of the adventure for me. If I wanted a guided tour I'd do them- I want to discover things on my own. I do read 100% of the cache pages and quite often read thru the past logs before adding mine. At that point I have a personal frame of reference to use when writing my log and can compare it to what others have experienced and to what, if anything, the hider was intending for seekers to experience.

Edited by Corp Of Discovery
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If I place a cache on a trail, and tell you where to park and how to get started, please don't write me a log that says you found a quicker way to get there and didn't have to walk nearly so far. It was the experience of the trail that I was wanting you to have.

 

I'll echo briansnat and say, place a multi if you want to enforce a route. Or at least be sure and put your parking coords in the waypoints tool labeled "parking nameof cache" so they're readily findable and usable.

Trailhead coords too. Definitely place a multi if the obvious shortcut has serious negative issues (crossing private property, damage to a fragile environment).

 

Finding alternate route B can be part of the fun. Locally to me, I often see parking and trailhead coords that represent the way the cache owner got there. Not even close to the route I'll take to get to the same spot. Maybe easier, maybe harder. I'm often more familiar with the area than the cache placer.

 

I read descriptions on higher terrain and difficulty rated caches. Rarely on anything at or below 2. I field decrypt hints after a search - (don't get me started on useless hints....).

 

It's all in the PDA, if I need it, I'll read it. I'd read more of them if so many weren't so full of stuff that I could hardly care less about. In addition to astonishingly dull locations, there are many many many cache descriptions that are full of 'what happened to me here' stories that are even less interesting than the locations. And then there are two prolific hiders around me that write wonderful cache pages, and hide awful caches. I keep getting sucked in by the great write ups ;)

 

Locally there are cachers whose hides I;m going to enjoy and whose cache descriptions I read. Geology, history, how they got there, whatever. I'm interested. I'm hoping that with the site upgrades some kind of ratings will come to the site - finally. I think it may be possible to do a "if you liked this, you'll like these" type rating.

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There is so many factors that can change a cachers experience, bugs can be bad that day, the weather and the time you may have. I usually look for 1 main cache that I really would like to do. Then I'll cache along the route to that cache. I usually look for easier ones along the route, so to have enough time to do the main one I'm going after.

Finding a good main cache, I like to see pics of some of the beauty that I can expect, so a pic on the cache page will get my interest more than the write up.

Also many cachers can be from out of town, so sometimes the easier ones are done, sometimes when going through your town, cachers don't have lots of time for a long cache.

But you'll find over time, there will be cachers who will see the cache exactly as you intended. And if it goes unfound for a length of time, there will be someone who'll go after it. I've done many in my area where I'm the only one to find in over years.

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I doubt I have read the cache page on even 10% of my finds. I have them on my PDA and laptop if I need them, but I hunt the cache first. I like it that way. ;)

 

This is the way we do it when we're on an all day cache run away from home. Puzzle caches get read, solved if we're lucky, and we also make sure to read the higher difficulty or terrain cache descriptions. Otherwise, it's pretty much "load and go" for us. Like so many on here advocate, there are many ways to geocache and this is sometimes how we choose to do it. Yes, we may miss out on history and some of the good stuff, but that's a decision that we have made for ourselves and therefore, our problem. As far as safety, we understand the risks involved with caching and don't need someone to hold our hands. If we come up to a spot and encounter something questionable, we read the description. If we are having trouble finding the cache, we read the description. If we have time and feel like doing it, then we might read the description. We cache this way sometimes and it shouldn't cause any angst!

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I don't look for or find all that many caches each year and I really enjoy the ones that are out in the woods somewhere with a nice walk/hike. I also appreciate when folks take the time to provide a nice write-up on their cache's page.

 

For my own hides, I don't really mind if folks ignore my posted parking coordinates, description text, or other such things -- I figure it's their loss, not mine. The only thing that burns me is when a finder does something that could cause some ill will for geocaching.

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Not wanting to beat this one into the ground, but a lot of my caches are story-dependent, and if most people are not reading or caring about the story, then the caches are very average, at best.

 

I just wanted to know what the general mindset is, because I want to please people with my caches. If you don't care to know why Egg and I Road is named that, then you've just got a micro by the side of the road. There's no way to place a great cache there, but I thought the story was very interesting.

 

I'm not going to stop hiding caches, but again, I'm as low-tech a cacher as you can get, and I don't know what the norm is now. Perhaps I need to change my method, but I'd be sorry to see the ones that are interesting reads go.

Edited by bumblingbs
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I just wanted to know what the general mindset is, because I want to please people with my caches. If you don't care to know why Egg and I Road is named that, then you've just got a micro by the side of the road. There's no way to place a great cache there, but I thought the story was very interesting.

 

Let's face it, there are those out there that just like finding caches and adding to their find count. Allthough it's interesting to most, these cachers could care less about why the road was named Egg and I Road. What you call a "just a micro by the side of the road" is a great cache that gets a smilie for many people.

 

I'm kinda in the middle on this and it depends on the caching situation. We have to drive a pretty good ways to find caches these days. Since we do have to drive so far, we usually try to find as many caches as we can to make the trip worth while. Don't get me wrong, we have traveled 50 plus miles one way to get one cache but that doesn't happen as often with gas prices so high these days. There are those times when we have only a few caches to go for so we get to take our time and read the descriptions along with the previous logs. The thing is, either of these are fine and should be respected by others.

 

p.s. That does sound interesting and now i'm curious. Which cache is it that tells the history of Egg and I Road? ;)

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And if the info in the description is so important that you must read for safety's sake, then you should not have a cache there.

I figure, if someone chooses not to read my cache page, and they are removed from the gene pool as a result, the fault is their's, not mine.

I agree. But...

 

The cache that i had referred to and still refer to is one where parking in a certain spot can slow firemen/paramedics down which could result in someone not getting treatment they need fast enough. Unlikely, but certainly possible.

 

I do not agree with what i originally posted. I was just pointing out that what others claimed about caches like this.

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I don't know "load and go" , as I've said, I don't do it. I'm sorry if it has come to that.

I made the term up.It reffers to loading your PDA/GPS with the vitals of the cache and going to the cache.The second paragraph was to the other poster,not you.I don't cache this way either,and since I started learning about all of this non cache page reading,I may never start.

I read the pages, but on my PDA. Not usually on my PC as i dont know where i am going before i get there. Just because you load and go doesn't mean that you don't read the pages.

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