Jump to content

camping and backpacking stoves.


Michael
Followers 7

Recommended Posts

Although I am a pretty good fabricator I decided against making my own stove for now.

I bought the Jet Boil BackCountry Gourmet kit that was on sale at REI. Also bought the 1.3 liter pot and some fuel canisters. Will be testing it out next week.

 

Making your own stoves is a LOT of fun... really, however, I guess I'm just THAT lazy and prefer the Jetboil. It's a lot less fuss in the long run.

 

 

 

 

michelle

Link to comment

Although I am a pretty good fabricator I decided against making my own stove for now.

I bought the Jet Boil BackCountry Gourmet kit that was on sale at REI. Also bought the 1.3 liter pot and some fuel canisters. Will be testing it out next week.

 

Making your own stoves is a LOT of fun... really, however, I guess I'm just THAT lazy and prefer the Jetboil. It's a lot less fuss in the long run.

 

 

 

 

michelle

Boy is it ever. I just used the Jetboil for the first time while out hiking with my Mom yesterday. It was on a tilted rock and I didn't have to worry about the pot slipping off. Two cups of water came to a boil much faster than my gigapeak ever did and the french press (albeit a bit messy) produced a superior cup of coffee to my previous method. I'll just have to get another bandana to replace the one I just turned into a washrag.

Link to comment

Boy is it ever. I just used the Jetboil for the first time while out hiking with my Mom yesterday. It was on a tilted rock and I didn't have to worry about the pot slipping off. Two cups of water came to a boil much faster than my gigapeak ever did and the french press (albeit a bit messy) produced a superior cup of coffee to my previous method. I'll just have to get another bandana to replace the one I just turned into a washrag.

 

Wash?

 

That's 'seasoning'.

 

 

 

michelle

Link to comment

I keep building lightweight stoves, but inevitably give them away and build another. Here's a link with instructions...http://wings.interfree.it/html/Pepsi.html

 

They're about 3 grams and a very small bottle of denatured alchohol has kept Moun10Girl and myself with hot food for 3 day trips.

 

When I'm in a hurry or just feeling lazy I take along my MSR Pocket Rocket. Light, super small and pretty efficient. :)

 

 

edit: hmmm.... the Scott Henderson link is broken, but here are a bunch of other home-mades... http://wings.interfree.it/html/main.html

 

edit#2: aah hah! Here's a page with the complete instructions toward the bottom... http://zenstoves.net/BasicTopBurner.htm

 

edit#3: oh, and skip the glue. Just pick up a roll of metal ducting tape at home depot and wrap a 8-10 strip around the outside when it's assembled and smooth it down nice and tight. You can use it within minutes then and pull it apart on the trail if it needs to be cleaned/dried/repaired later.

Edited by fox-and-the-hound
Link to comment

All these fancy stoves and gizmos. I see the purpose of alcohol stoves if you are into ultralight hiking. For me, no stove I have seen works better, easier, or more consistently than the Bluet. It's kind of old school, but I have had mine for twenty years and have no interest in changing.

 

Happy Caching

Link to comment

Hi Community

I do alot of long distance cycling, and at the moment I use a Trangia with gas adaptor. My first stove was an MSR Whisperlight, but the older regulator (either full power or out) I see MSR have now brought out a better regulator, but I have burnt my fingers once with MSR and to be honest a bit wary to go back to the product.

 

I'm thinking of buying a Optimus Nova and wonder if anybody has had experience with this stove.

 

Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Regards

Edited by Red Chilli
Link to comment

Hi Community

I do alot of long distance cycling, and at the moment I use a Trangia with gas adaptor. My first stove was an MSR Whisperlight, but the older regulator (either full power or out) I see MSR have now brought out a better regulator, but I have burnt my fingers once with MSR and to be honest a bit wary to go back to the product.

 

I'm thinking of buying a Optimus Nova and wonder if anybody has had experience with this stove.

 

Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Regards

 

The MSR dragonfly does have a great simmer ability. it goes from full roar to barely on. I have used it and it does work great.

Edited by Michael
Link to comment

Thanks for the reply, but as I said I have burnt my fingers once with MSR, and I try to learn from my mistakes.

 

Happy simming. :ph34r:

 

The very first Sony Color TV used a 19" RCA style CRT. It was a disaster. Sony recalled all of them and went back to the drawing board. Thus was born the Trinitron. Arguably the best CRT ever made. If people had not bought a new TV after the old one that was so bad they would have missed out on a really good picture.

 

The same can be said of MSR. The Whisperlite sucked in its ability to simmer as did all the rest before the Dragonfly. It simmers because they abandoned how they controlled the other stoves and came up with a new type of control. You don't have to buy one but the ability of the Dragonfly is amazing from a gentle simmer to a full power snow melter. I have played with the Optimus Nova and find the Dragonfly a better stove for simmering and all around use. Either one is a good stove. The design on both is very similar.

 

Id suggest that if you can get past the bad feeling of the old one you check it out. It really does work well. I also understand the "once burned, twice shy" concept.

Edited by Michael
Link to comment

I'm sticking with my trust old soda can stove. It's been burning for a couple 1000 miles and still going strong. HH ;)

 

And if it does die you can normally find a can laying around in the outdoors to make another one. I did that the other weekend while on a picnic.

Link to comment

I am a stove aholic, and am proud of it. I had an old Coleman stove, a whisperlite, several incarnations of alky stoves, a pocket rocket, another canister stove that I dont recall what it was (may have been an MSR), and, my current one, a giga power one. I went with the Giga Power one as I recently picked up a GSI Soloist cookset (I am a cookset aholic too), and wanted the stove that fits in there. So, looking back, I think I have had 8 stoves in 10 years. Thats pretty scary!!!

I am testing out the stove & cookset, along with a modded hammock, this weekend, on an overnite trip with my nephew. I have no doubt the stuff will work great. I am so excited I get to try out a new stove!!!

Link to comment

...

 

and, my current one, a giga power one. I went with the Giga Power one as I recently picked up a GSI Soloist cookset (I am a cookset aholic too), and wanted the stove that fits in there.

 

...

 

 

:)

 

Funny stuff.

 

I picked up the GSI Dualist because I wanted two inner nesting 'cups' (it comes with two cups/two bowls so I've removed the bowls for camping purposes) If the Soloist had two, instead of one, I would have snapped that up instead.

 

The complement, of course, is the Giga Power stove which I also purchased. I highly recommend the wind screen if you don't have it... handily enough, the screen fits inside the Dualist (but not the Soloist).

 

You can even make cool things like muffins (two!) in the Soloist (misshapen as they may turn out) and the Dualist. Even though they're a bit anemic looking on the outside, they're quite a treat after a few days.

 

f1095c52-3896-4e96-86ee-d607608023f9.jpg

 

 

michelle

Link to comment

This is a copy of the stove that Eb "Nimblewill Nomad" made and used on

his epic backpacking trip from Key West, Florida to Cape Gaspe, Canada; 4400 miles,

10 months. During this trip Eb did not carry any fuel. Instead he used this

simple metal stove and burned leaves, bark, wood, twigs and other natural

fuel to cook his meals. The only mods that I've made is I bent a wire rod

to form a grill that sits on the top of the stove, this then lets me stand

small pots and canned food on the cooker. The other main thing that I found

was my meths burner from my old bulky Trangia set fits in the cooker and

sits the correct distance away from the pots so that the flame can lick

up real good. The use of the meths burner is ideal when you don't want to

start a fire or when you're in an area where fires are not allowed. I would

like to say a huge thanks to "Eb" for putting the design on the inet. I've used

it for over four years now and have not looked back at my heavy Colman cookers.

 

Have a look at the one I made...

http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/stuthehiker/...eAndMethsBurner

Link to comment

I'm a huge fan of the JetBoil system.

I've had mine close to a year now and love it. All I do is boil my water and add it to my dry food in freezer bags.

All I have to do is lick the spoon to clean up after cooking.

 

This is a good site to check out:

http://www.freezerbagcooking.com/

 

I'm a bit concerned about BPA or other nasty chemicals, so I don't like the idea of cooking with freezer bags.

Link to comment

I'm a huge fan of the JetBoil system.

I've had mine close to a year now and love it. All I do is boil my water and add it to my dry food in freezer bags.

All I have to do is lick the spoon to clean up after cooking.

 

This is a good site to check out:

http://www.freezerbagcooking.com/

 

I'm a bit concerned about BPA or other nasty chemicals, so I don't like the idea of cooking with freezer bags.

 

This is what Ziploc and Glades website say:

http://www.saranbrands.com/faq.asp#1

 

http://www.glad.com/faqs/foodbags.php#3

Link to comment

My brother in the Army got me some MREs, so I'll be testing out the FRH this weekend. <_<

 

And my rather heavy Peak 1 propane for hot water. This one, not the nicer backpacking ones (the box said Peak 1, but this doesn't match anything else I've seen using that name). I'm sure I'll be back in this thread on Sunday, looking for recommendations for a new stove.

Edited by Dinoprophet
Link to comment

My brother in the Army got me some MREs, so I'll be testing out the FRH this weekend. :D

 

And my rather heavy Peak 1 propane for hot water. This one, not the nicer backpacking ones (the box said Peak 1, but this doesn't match anything else I've seen using that name). I'm sure I'll be back in this thread on Sunday, looking for recommendations for a new stove.

If nothing else you have an emergency reflector. :D<_<

Link to comment

My brother in the Army got me some MREs, so I'll be testing out the FRH this weekend. :laughing:

 

And my rather heavy Peak 1 propane for hot water. This one, not the nicer backpacking ones (the box said Peak 1, but this doesn't match anything else I've seen using that name). I'm sure I'll be back in this thread on Sunday, looking for recommendations for a new stove.

If nothing else you have an emergency reflector. :D<_<

:D

Actually, since posting, I've looked at some reviews for it, and they're all very favorable. It's really fast and keeps a good flame, they say. But it is 2 lbs, plus the big ol propane tank. I got it as part of a set with this lantern for under $20(!) at Costco a few years ago. I've only used it for car camping so far. We'll see how it goes, maybe I'll be thrilled with it.

Link to comment

Coleman One Burner Stove

51HKZEP2C0L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

 

Pros: self-igniting, just turn on the gas and poof (usually took two tries, though). Brought 750 mL to a rolling boil in under five minutes in 30° air.

 

Cons: Heavy (2.2lbs plus whatever a propane bottle weighs) and bulky -- doesn't cooperate when your bag is stuffed. No convenient way to strap it outside, though I managed eventually. Fuel is also bulky. Turned any higher than the lowest, the invisible part of the flame was coming around the edges of my pot -- a little scary.

 

Verdict: cute for car camping, and I'd take it if the rest of my load was small, but it's just too big when you've got a full pack

 

3c85dbdd-749a-43a5-aa82-c262fbcb6acc.jpg

(This was the first night, when we had the car. The tarp tent stayed in the car after that, but it sure was nice that night)

 

Also, regarding the MREs -- also too bulky. I should have at least broken them down into their component parts.

 

This was my first real backpack trip, so I learned a lot.

Edited by Dinoprophet
Link to comment

Coleman One Burner Stove

51HKZEP2C0L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

 

Pros: self-igniting, just turn on the gas and poof (usually took two tries, though). Brought 750 mL to a rolling boil in under five minutes in 30° air.

 

Cons: Heavy (2.2lbs plus whatever a propane bottle weighs ) and bulky -- doesn't cooperate when your bag is stuffed. No convenient way to strap it outside, though I managed eventually. Fuel is also bulky. Turned any higher than the lowest, the invisible part of the flame was coming around the edges of my pot -- a little scary.

 

Verdict: cute for car camping, and I'd take it if the rest of my load was small, but it's just too big when you've got a full pack

 

(This was the first night, when we had the car. The tarp tent stayed in the car after that, but it sure was nice that night)

 

Also, regarding the MREs -- also too bulky. I should have at least broken them down into their component parts.

 

This was my first real backpack trip, so I learned a lot.

If memory serves right, it's about 1.3 lbs. That's 1 lb for the gas. :rolleyes:

Link to comment

Coleman One Burner Stove

51HKZEP2C0L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

 

Pros: self-igniting, just turn on the gas and poof (usually took two tries, though). Brought 750 mL to a rolling boil in under five minutes in 30° air.

 

Cons: Heavy (2.2lbs plus whatever a propane bottle weighs) and bulky -- doesn't cooperate when your bag is stuffed. No convenient way to strap it outside, though I managed eventually. Fuel is also bulky. Turned any higher than the lowest, the invisible part of the flame was coming around the edges of my pot -- a little scary.

 

Verdict: cute for car camping, and I'd take it if the rest of my load was small, but it's just too big when you've got a full pack

 

3c85dbdd-749a-43a5-aa82-c262fbcb6acc.jpg

(This was the first night, when we had the car. The tarp tent stayed in the car after that, but it sure was nice that night)

 

Also, regarding the MREs -- also too bulky. I should have at least broken them down into their component parts.

 

This was my first real backpack trip, so I learned a lot.

 

:blink: welldone on your first real backpack trip, and you will learn loads as time goes by. You will buy more kit than you can shake a stick at and in a years time it will be tossed in the back of the shed in favour of the odd few inexspensive bits of kit that serve you well :D

 

Getting out there is the best way to learn, and a dose of helpfull advice from some hikers will help loads.

Edited by stuthehiker
Link to comment

Well, thanks! Unfortunately, my partner and I bit off more than we could chew. By the end of the ten miles, we weren't sure we could make it back the next day -- his legs wouldn't move and my shoulders were on fire. A very nice conservation officer in the area got us back to our car. But as I said, we got a lot out of it, and I can't wait to go back!

 

"Gypsy-like" -- yeah, that was us!

 

Back on the cooking devices, I didn't get a proper test of the FRH. Just as it was finished, the CO pulled up, so the food refroze in the back of the truck for the ride back.

Edited by Dinoprophet
Link to comment

Well, thanks! Unfortunately, my partner and I bit off more than we could chew. By the end of the ten miles, we weren't sure we could make it back the next day -- his legs wouldn't move and my shoulders were on fire. A very nice conservation officer in the area got us back to our car. But as I said, we got a lot out of it, and I can't wait to go back!

 

WOW........a twenty mile round trip was alot for your first hike.

My first overnight hike was about half a mile into the forest just so I could test out the kit and get a feel for the things that I had with and around me. Building a campfire for the first time, collecting water, putting up a good tarp, it was all done within a mile of the car.

 

Round trips are always good to do, I've made the mistake of hiking somewhere and then coming back the same route, it can be very boring seeing the same old stuff but if you're new it can lift your spirits no end.

 

I would advise that for your next outing you take a shorter hike, maybe a loop back to your car, or maybe see if you can drop your car off at your END point and get a friend to drop you at the START of your hike.

 

The other thing is heavy, fancy, bulky kit. That stove you have there will soon be on the shelf collecting dust as you work your way though stove after stove until you hit on one that suits you best.

 

It's all good fun even though I'm sat here feeling as sick as a dog after a very wet few nights lay in the damp cold of the forest, then a next day hike back to the car in pouring rain. But saying that I still have good memories and plenty of photos to remind me that there was a few moments where there was no rain :D

Edited by stuthehiker
Link to comment

Well, it only would have been 18 miles if we'd finished. :D. The loop is ten on one side, 8 on the other. I do camp and hike, so I know some of the ropes (and knots). I've been doing short hikes with a full pack, testing my gear, and lighting fires. This was just my first overnighter (and not really my first, just the first that I planned myself and had to carry all of my own gear, and the first in ten years). Really, I'd have been fine, except for my straps rubbing horribly. I need to figure that out.

 

But enough about me. We're here to talk stoves.

Edited by Dinoprophet
Link to comment

I went out for a solo overnight out on the backcountry dunes at Assateague Island this weekend, in fog and rain. I pulled out the very old and very used SVEA (ca. 1977) that hadn't been fired up in at least 8 years. It worked perfectly, boiled water very quickly, and all in all, it still is the best stove I've ever used. Sometimes new and improved isn't as good.

 

I still like this one best.

7c1a26fd-f107-4b4f-8d3e-69f5c2eaec33.jpg

Link to comment

I went out for a solo overnight out on the backcountry dunes at Assateague Island this weekend, in fog and rain. I pulled out the very old and very used SVEA (ca. 1977) that hadn't been fired up in at least 8 years. It worked perfectly, boiled water very quickly, and all in all, it still is the best stove I've ever used. Sometimes new and improved isn't as good.

 

I still like this one best.

 

True that. However, for folks looking to replace their equipment because it isin't performing the way they expected, or they see areas of improvement, the new and improved behooves a look see.

 

Now, at 8 years of non-usage, and in the visible condition your stove is in, you didn't mention how far back you were standing after you lit it. <_<

 

I'd have to wonder when the next fireworks display is going to happen. :anibad:

Link to comment

I went out for a solo overnight out on the backcountry dunes at Assateague Island this weekend, in fog and rain. I pulled out the very old and very used SVEA (ca. 1977) that hadn't been fired up in at least 8 years. It worked perfectly, boiled water very quickly, and all in all, it still is the best stove I've ever used. Sometimes new and improved isn't as good.

 

I still like this one best.

 

True that. However, for folks looking to replace their equipment because it isin't performing the way they expected, or they see areas of improvement, the new and improved behooves a look see.

 

Now, at 8 years of non-usage, and in the visible condition your stove is in, you didn't mention how far back you were standing after you lit it. :laughing:

 

I'd have to wonder when the next fireworks display is going to happen. :anibad:

 

Nah, it probably won't ever blow. The SVEA's cap is vented to blow off excessive pressure if it gets too high. At best, you'd get a mini- (3-4") flame thrower from the vent for a minute or two until the pressure releases and there isn't enough umph to keep the stove firing. I've seen this happen once on another larger Optimus brass stove, but not on the SVEA. I've had more flame issues getting my Whisperlite fired up.

 

What I should do is order a repair kit to replace the cap gasket and the graphite packing inside the control stem. Not enough to make it blow up...

 

By the way, the SVEA is still made for around $75-100 brand new, and they haven't changed the design at all. It's a bit heavy, but it's never failed me in any weather, from rain to snow and from cold to hot. And I love that sound!

Link to comment

Here is my six ounce cookset

 

I'm using a slightly heavier cookset these days. I am now using a Kitten stove and have gone back to using my evernew titanium pot. This set up cooks faster and that is important when I just need a hot drink or a hot meal on a very cold day and don't want to be shivering before it is cooked.

 

This is what I use now:

My Webpage it is just over half way down the page.

 

lunch.JPG

 

(Hot Lunch on the North Fork Skokomish in December)

Edited by luckykoi
Link to comment

I've still got my JetBoil and love it. However, I didn't quite feel like carrying it across the ocean with me (my wife and I are studying in Ireland for the semester). During our Easter break, we're going to backpack across Europe.

 

I've got to figure out which stove I want to make to carry with us. I'm debating between a wood burning stove or a alcohol stove. I'm sure I can buy something to use for fuel here, so that is a distinct possibility. I'm not as sure how easy it will be to find twigs and other natural fuel.

Guess I've got some more research to do, then it's time to get started...

Link to comment

I've still got my JetBoil and love it. However, I didn't quite feel like carrying it across the ocean with me (my wife and I are studying in Ireland for the semester). During our Easter break, we're going to backpack across Europe.

 

I've got to figure out which stove I want to make to carry with us. I'm debating between a wood burning stove or a alcohol stove. I'm sure I can buy something to use for fuel here, so that is a distinct possibility. I'm not as sure how easy it will be to find twigs and other natural fuel.

Guess I've got some more research to do, then it's time to get started...

 

Go with an alcohol stove. Make some of the pepsi can stoves...they are simple, and cheap to make. And, if you ever crush one, you can simply make another. Meths overseas is the most prevalent fuel, you're best off going with that. Check out some ultralight packpacking forums too...they make a windshield for them, called wings or something. I have one, it works awesome.

Link to comment

I've been looking through this thread, getting lots of interesting info. I've been playing with alcohol and solid fuel stoves a bit. I found this "USGI Butterly Stove" on a military surplus site, but there's no info on it.

Stove-Butterfly-Type-US-GI-350.jpg

LINKY

 

I assume it's meant to burn solid fuel, and that's good, but I'm really interested in modding it for use as a pot stand for an alcohol stove. Wondering if anyone here knows more about it, or another source to purchase. It's only $4, but shipping is $10 and there's not much else on the site I want to buy.

Link to comment

I am a bit of a backcountry gourmet. I like the challenge of preparing meals that are compared to those prepared at fine restaurants. To do this I need stoves with maximum heat control. A good test for a stove that would fit my needs would be what I call the pancake test. If I can easily cook pancakes without burning them then the stove is acceptable. I have no need for a stove whose claim to fame is that it can boil water faster than you can filter it. My original stove was a Coleman Apex II which is a great stove at a great price, highly recommended. My newest stove is a Snowpeak liquid fuel stove which also has a wide range of heat and folds up compactly. It is also, like most Japanese high end products, a work of art. There is a considerable price to pay for the small size and weight savings. $ for $ the Colman Apex II is the best value if you don’t mind the small increase in weight and size.

Link to comment

I am a bit of a backcountry gourmet. I like the challenge of preparing meals that are compared to those prepared at fine restaurants. To do this I need stoves with maximum heat control. A good test for a stove that would fit my needs would be what I call the pancake test. If I can easily cook pancakes without burning them then the stove is acceptable. I have no need for a stove whose claim to fame is that it can boil water faster than you can filter it. My original stove was a Coleman Apex II which is a great stove at a great price, highly recommended. My newest stove is a Snowpeak liquid fuel stove which also has a wide range of heat and folds up compactly. It is also, like most Japanese high end products, a work of art. There is a considerable price to pay for the small size and weight savings. $ for $ the Colman Apex II is the best value if you don’t mind the small increase in weight and size.

Gotta agree with your Apex II recommendation -- my old Coleman Peak 1 (non-multi-fuel -- it's old!) basically has the same burner design as the newer Apex. The Apex is a big improvement since the stove feeds off your fuel tank (no funnel needed) and it's multi-fuel (no trouble when white gas not available).

 

The Colemans can crank out massive btu's but can be dialed way back to a simmer. Extremely reliable and easy to maintain. Oh yeah, and you will have money left over for food and fuel. The only thing against it is that they are liquid-fueled, so not safe for cooking in the tent.)

Link to comment

Please don't drink the Denatured stuff it makes you die.

 

iloled-pam.jpg

 

Back on topic...

 

Personally, I look for something that "gets the job done" for a little/no cost. This usually translates to building my own equipment, which works very nicely.

 

First, I want to note that I always bring a backup (of everything). My backup stove is one of those soda pop alcohol stoves that my friend gave me for my birthday.

 

The main stove is made out of a coffee tin. The bottom has been removed (but not discarded) so it looks like a cylinder. There are two main holes in the bottom to feed fuel through (sticks, pinecones, fuel blocks, etc.). Holes are punched all around the tin about 3/4 of the way up. That's it!

 

If I want to, I can put metal rods (I use bits of hangars) through the holes to keep food from falling into the flame. Normally I'll just put my mess kit plate/bowl/cup on top, and let it cook.

Link to comment

Hi Community

I do alot of long distance cycling, and at the moment I use a Trangia with gas adaptor. My first stove was an MSR Whisperlight, but the older regulator (either full power or out) I see MSR have now brought out a better regulator, but I have burnt my fingers once with MSR and to be honest a bit wary to go back to the product.

 

I'm thinking of buying a Optimus Nova and wonder if anybody has had experience with this stove.

 

Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Regards

 

The MSR dragonfly does have a great simmer ability. it goes from full roar to barely on. I have used it and it does work great.

 

I own one and it works great. I find it kinda loud even at the low end, tho'.

Link to comment

MSR stoves have always been loud, at least the ones I've heard. But they do work and they are strong. I carry the repair kit that takes up very little space and short of a bad hose I'm set IF I need to fix one. I have never had to fix one on the trail yet.

Link to comment

As the season ends for a lot of us above the equator don't forget to check your seals and o-rings as you pack the gear away for the winter, (I'm not talking to those of you that camp year round :blink: )

 

If you take a few minutes now to do your maintenance you will have a stove that is ready to go in the spring when the camping bug hits you again.

 

Those that made their own stove can spend the time refining the design for next year. Anyone care to share their favorite design for an alcohol stove?

Link to comment

Our most recent acquisition to the stove debate:

 

251936_10150984698749382_1542114354_n.jpg

 

A, so called, biomass stove that runs off of wood/forest debris. Very simple design and seems to burn pretty hot compared to our Jetboil. I'm not totally sold on the recharge capabilities yet, but it saves a bit of weight in fuel canisters and the usual paraphernalia of the butane/white gas sort of stoves.

Link to comment

That looks interesting. I don't need to charge anything that uses USB connections, I didn't see any other in the specs however.

Perhaps I need to see if USB can be used for other things (I'm dated a bit). The USB LED light in the demo looked useful, you could read and maybe plan tomorrow while waiting for tea/coffee/hot chocolate etc. tonight.

 

Wonder how it stacks up the the 'storm' kettle type (non fan blown)? Wonder if one could make a similar TEG to fit on any stove?

It would appear to be a form of thermocouple optimized for the purpose.

 

Keep us informed please, this place is a world of biomass here. I see they don't ship out of the US unless we take over the costs and customs hassles... oh well that can be dealt with if needed.

 

Doug 7rxc

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 7
×
×
  • Create New...