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Michael

camping and backpacking stoves.

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I own a MSR Whisperlite, 2 Peak one 440's and a 2 burner Coleman propane camp stove. Lately Ive been working on making alcohol (metho) stoves out of pop cans. Here is an example of one type (not mine) Ive been making unpressurized open burners and the sealed top pressurized side jets. All seem to work well. They will boil 2 cups of water in about 7-9 minutes at 6000 ft. and use about 2/3 of an ounce of Denatured or everclear alcohol. I also bought a few Trainga burners. They will boil 2 cups of water in 7-9 minutes and then simmer for another 20 using about 1.5 ounces of alcohol. Not as fast as a liquid gas stove but they are super light, take up very little space and you can get the handmade ones to simmer too with the addition of a simmer ring. For long hiking trips you need to consider that for big meals you need a lot of fuel but you save weight on the stove so its something to think about. As long as I'm just doing meals that need hot water its a great stove. real cooking is more of a challenge and Id take a Whisperlite or the peak one.

 

You can get Denatured Alcohol at Walmart for about 5.00 dollars a quart. You can get Everclear for about 18.00 a quart. The only advantage of Everclear is you can cut it with water and drink it!! Please don't drink the Denatured stuff it makes you die. If you get into making your own Alcohol it will cost you about $0.60 cents per quart. and you can drink that too. In a pinch these stoves will burn rubbing alcohol which is 70% (140 proof) so you can burn an drinking alcohol that is at least 140 Proof.

 

These are cool to try to make and if nothing else its a good skill to have for long term survival. I am also learning to make the alcohol for the stoves. All Alcohol stoves require a wind screen and if its really cold they do require a little skill to light. Be very careful Alcohol burns almost clear. in the daytime it is very hard to see them burning.

 

Advantages of metho (Alcohol)

Very cheap and readily available

Comes in recyclable plastic containers, not disposable metal canisters

Is made from fermentation of sugars, so is a renewable resource

Is environmentally friendly, burning to give only carbon dioxide and water

Is a liquid, not a gas so its easy to see how much you have left

Safer than other liquid fuels - no dangerous flare ups

Will burn at cold temperatures and high altitude - although somewhat slower

Metho (Alcohol) burners are maintenance free since they contain no moving parts and no small jets which can get blocked

Metho (Alcohol) burners are incredibly reliable

Metho (Alcohol) burners are very quiet - almost silent

Spare metho (Alcohol)makes a handy solvent around the house

 

Disadvantages of metho (Alcohol)

Metho (ethanol) has a lower heat output per weight of fuel than some other fuels. (Ethanol: 30 kJ/g, Butane: 49 kJ/g).

Takes longer to boil water than some other fuels. (About twice as long as gas)

 

A good link for information about the Trangia burner. All examples apply to a standard pop can alcohol stove.

 

FYI they burn much cleaner than a gas stove. I do have admit that the Trangia alcohol burner with its simmer ring and lid lets you carry 3 OZ. of fuel in the stove. normally more than all I need for a over night trip of an evening meal, hot drink and a hot breakfast. so if you do not want to make one you can either buy the pop can stoves cheap on Ebay or buy a Trangia.

 

Anyone else using or making these?

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We have a Jetboil and a Coleman Apex II. Not much more to say about them other than I love'em both. If I stick to simple, one pot cooking on weekends, I generally use part of one fuel canister with the Apex. Just got the Jetboil last year and have had the Apex for about 5 years. It's done tours all over WV, in the Monongalia National Forest, and at Philmont Scout Ranch in Cimarron, NM, without ever failing.

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2 Whisperlites. Lost the pump/valve mechanism for my first one and when I went to buy a new one, I found it was almost as much as a new stove, so I just bought a new stove. Of course a month later I found the old pump. I actually like the new design much better so I use the new stove now.

 

The Whisperlite uses gas and is a great stove for boiling water, but it has one setting - blowtorch. If you need to simmer something you really have to pay attention. There is a way to get a low flame by partially pumping it, but it takes a little practice.

 

The Whisperlite also takes some practice to light. If you screw up, you might set your beard on fire. But once you have it down its a great stove. Durable, stable, lightweight and compact stove.

 

1 Coleman Peak 1 multi fuel (gas, kerosene). A fairly bulky and heavy stove. The tank is attached to the stove, which I don't like. It does have an adjustable flame for simmering. It is easy to light, just pump, turn the valve and strike a match, but it has a tendancy to leak and I've had flames shooting out of the side of the thing, melting the plastic feet. Not super stable either I rarely use this one.

 

1 MSR Pocket Rocket. An excellent propane stove. Very easy to use. No pumping, just turn the valve and light. Boils water quickly and has an adjustable flame for simmering.

 

Sans the propane can, the Pocket Rocket fits in the palm of your hand. Negatives are that you have to pack out the empty canisters, when the fuel is gets low, so does the heat output and it works poorly (or not at all) in sub feezing temps.

 

For most trips I bring a Whisperlite for boiling water and if I have a meal that requires simmering, I also bring the Pocket Rocket. If I only bring one stove it is the Whisperlite.

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2 Whisperlites. Lost the pump/valve mechanism for my first one and when I went to buy a new one, I found it was almost as much as a new stove, so I just bought a new stove. Of course a month later I found the old pump. I actually like the new design much better so I use the new stove now.

 

The Whisperlite uses gas and is a great stove for boiling water, but it has one setting - blowtorch. If you need to simmer something you really have to pay attention. There is a way to get a low flame by partially pumping it, but it takes a little practice.

 

The Whisperlite also takes some practice to light. If you screw up, you might set your beard on fire. But once you have it down its a great stove. Durable, stable, lightweight and compact stove.

 

1 Coleman Peak 1 multi fuel (gas, kerosene). A fairly bulky and heavy stove. The tank is attached to the stove, which I don't like. It does have an adjustable flame for simmering. It is easy to light, just pump, turn the valve and strike a match, but it has a tendancy to leak and I've had flames shooting out of the side of the thing, melting the plastic feet. Not super stable either I rarely use this one.

 

1 MSR Pocket Rocket. An excellent propane stove. Very easy to use. No pumping, just turn the valve and light. Boils water quickly and has an adjustable flame for simmering.

 

Sans the propane can, the Pocket Rocket fits in the palm of your hand. Negatives are that you have to pack out the empty canisters, when the fuel is gets low, so does the heat output and it works poorly (or not at all) in sub feezing temps.

 

For most trips I bring a Whisperlite for boiling water and if I have a meal that requires simmering, I also bring the Pocket Rocket. If I only bring one stove it is the Whisperlite.

 

I have found that if I put the "K" Jet in my Whisperlite it will simmer. The other trick I use is a heat deflector made from a can top. between these two the Whisperlite simmers fine.

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2 Whisperlites. Lost the pump/valve mechanism for my first one and when I went to buy a new one, I found it was almost as much as a new stove, so I just bought a new stove. Of course a month later I found the old pump. I actually like the new design much better so I use the new stove now.

 

The Whisperlite uses gas and is a great stove for boiling water, but it has one setting - blowtorch. If you need to simmer something you really have to pay attention. There is a way to get a low flame by partially pumping it, but it takes a little practice.

 

The Whisperlite also takes some practice to light. If you screw up, you might set your beard on fire. But once you have it down its a great stove. Durable, stable, lightweight and compact stove.

 

1 Coleman Peak 1 multi fuel (gas, kerosene). A fairly bulky and heavy stove. The tank is attached to the stove, which I don't like. It does have an adjustable flame for simmering. It is easy to light, just pump, turn the valve and strike a match, but it has a tendancy to leak and I've had flames shooting out of the side of the thing, melting the plastic feet. Not super stable either I rarely use this one.

 

1 MSR Pocket Rocket. An excellent propane stove. Very easy to use. No pumping, just turn the valve and light. Boils water quickly and has an adjustable flame for simmering.

 

Sans the propane can, the Pocket Rocket fits in the palm of your hand. Negatives are that you have to pack out the empty canisters, when the fuel is gets low, so does the heat output and it works poorly (or not at all) in sub feezing temps.

 

For most trips I bring a Whisperlite for boiling water and if I have a meal that requires simmering, I also bring the Pocket Rocket. If I only bring one stove it is the Whisperlite.

 

I have found that if I put the "K" Jet in my Whisperlite it will simmer. The other trick I use is a heat deflector made from a can top. between these two the Whisperlite simmers fine.

 

I have a heat deflector called the Scorchbuster that helps.

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We settled on a coleman exponent (propane/butane).

Kind of a pain with the canisters, but a lot lighter than fuel cylinders.

If we're on the AT, we leave our "partial" cans (taped/re-capped) at a shelter for some through-hiker who may just need that little bit to get by.

If we just want coffee or tea, we open up an esbit pocket stove and use a heat tab or two.

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2 Whisperlites. Lost the pump/valve mechanism for my first one and when I went to buy a new one, I found it was almost as much as a new stove, so I just bought a new stove. Of course a month later I found the old pump. I actually like the new design much better so I use the new stove now.

 

The Whisperlite uses gas and is a great stove for boiling water, but it has one setting - blowtorch. If you need to simmer something you really have to pay attention. There is a way to get a low flame by partially pumping it, but it takes a little practice.

 

The Whisperlite also takes some practice to light. If you screw up, you might set your beard on fire. But once you have it down its a great stove. Durable, stable, lightweight and compact stove.

 

1 Coleman Peak 1 multi fuel (gas, kerosene). A fairly bulky and heavy stove. The tank is attached to the stove, which I don't like. It does have an adjustable flame for simmering. It is easy to light, just pump, turn the valve and strike a match, but it has a tendancy to leak and I've had flames shooting out of the side of the thing, melting the plastic feet. Not super stable either I rarely use this one.

 

1 MSR Pocket Rocket. An excellent propane stove. Very easy to use. No pumping, just turn the valve and light. Boils water quickly and has an adjustable flame for simmering.

 

Sans the propane can, the Pocket Rocket fits in the palm of your hand. Negatives are that you have to pack out the empty canisters, when the fuel is gets low, so does the heat output and it works poorly (or not at all) in sub feezing temps.

 

For most trips I bring a Whisperlite for boiling water and if I have a meal that requires simmering, I also bring the Pocket Rocket. If I only bring one stove it is the Whisperlite.

 

I have found that if I put the "K" Jet in my Whisperlite it will simmer. The other trick I use is a heat deflector made from a can top. between these two the Whisperlite simmers fine.

 

I have a heat deflector called the Scorchbuster that helps.

 

If you can pick up the "K" jet (Kerosene) you may find that it simmers really well with the Scorchbuster. The trade off is you lose a little off the high end for quick boiling.

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Speaking of the AT, I have a KLM of all the rest points on the AT. I'm not sure if its something that is common but if anyone wants it let me know. works great in Goggle earth.

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It's interesting that so many of us own more than one stove. I am, myself, a stove freak.

 

For my winter camping, I have an old Optimus 00. It's a smelly workhorse that is reliable and steady, even in the coldest weather. You can set it in a snowbank and it will continue to operate fine.

 

I own a MSR Dragonfly that I like very much. You can adjust that puppy to a bare minimum and get good results. It's balky in really cold weather until it gets going.

 

I also own a Zzip stove: a tiny woodburning stove with a battery and a fan. I carried it on the AT and it was great. I understand that some areas ban them now, but properly used, I don't see the problem with them.

 

I sure saw enough idjits try to blow their canister stoves or their white gas stoves up. Those tell-tale scorch marks on the floors of shelters give them away.

 

I want a Pocket Rocket someday, then I'll have a kero stove, a white gas stove, a wood stove and a canister stove. Heaven.

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It's interesting that so many of us own more than one stove. I am, myself, a stove freak.

 

For my winter camping, I have an old Optimus 00. It's a smelly workhorse that is reliable and steady, even in the coldest weather. You can set it in a snowbank and it will continue to operate fine.

 

I own a MSR Dragonfly that I like very much. You can adjust that puppy to a bare minimum and get good results. It's balky in really cold weather until it gets going.

 

I also own a Zzip stove: a tiny woodburning stove with a battery and a fan. I carried it on the AT and it was great. I understand that some areas ban them now, but properly used, I don't see the problem with them.

 

I sure saw enough idjits try to blow their canister stoves or their white gas stoves up. Those tell-tale scorch marks on the floors of shelters give them away.

 

I want a Pocket Rocket someday, then I'll have a kero stove, a white gas stove, a wood stove and a canister stove. Heaven.

 

Then all you need is an Alcohol stove. ;)

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It's interesting that so many of us own more than one stove. I am, myself, a stove freak.

 

For my winter camping, I have an old Optimus 00. It's a smelly workhorse that is reliable and steady, even in the coldest weather. You can set it in a snowbank and it will continue to operate fine.

 

I own a MSR Dragonfly that I like very much. You can adjust that puppy to a bare minimum and get good results. It's balky in really cold weather until it gets going.

 

I also own a Zzip stove: a tiny woodburning stove with a battery and a fan. I carried it on the AT and it was great. I understand that some areas ban them now, but properly used, I don't see the problem with them.

 

I sure saw enough idjits try to blow their canister stoves or their white gas stoves up. Those tell-tale scorch marks on the floors of shelters give them away.

 

I want a Pocket Rocket someday, then I'll have a kero stove, a white gas stove, a wood stove and a canister stove. Heaven.

 

Then all you need is an Alcohol stove. ;)

 

Ooo-ooo!!! I forgot about them....!

 

:););)

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A SVEA 123. Best stove ever made. Simple, works anywhere (for altitude you can't get a better stove). Owned one since the mid 80's. And what is more you can pick one up on eBay now for ten dollars or less. I'd suggest this stove over anything on the market for camping or backpacking. Weight may be a bit of a problem, but if you've never used anything else, you just don't notice.

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I bought a really good backpacking stove several years ago but I’ve never even used it. I don’t even remember what the brand or model is, it’s somewhere in the back of the closet. Once I got the jetboil, I’ve been using that with the dehydrated meals. Those pack light, are fast, easy cleanup, and most actually taste pretty good, often better than anything I could cook up in camp. I suppose someday I’ll pick up some titanium cookware and get creative, but it’s hard to beat the expediency of the ready-made ones.

 

971728.jpg

Edited by Criminal
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We have a couple of jet boils, here. I've had the gold-standard JB for a couple of years now and it's received a fair amount of use. I did return it for a replacement last fall. The lighter stopped working, and while I think they have a replacement for that part now... uh, no. It's not working, it was REI, and I took it back for a new one. Sorry. I just hadn't used it enough for it to be a bona fide failure due to overuse. (I do wonder if it had something to do with sand camping/major sand blowing around tho... eh, not for me to figure out.)

 

I _only_ use it to heat water and have never actually cooked anything in the 'cup'. Why? Lazy. Don't want to have to 'do the dishes'.

 

All food taken is the "just add water" type (kind of like those magic expanding sponges), or items that don't need to be cooked.

 

The other jb is the larger pot. I wouldn't take it hiking on a dare. Aside from the fact that it's huge, it really needs the larger fuel cannister to be the most stable. The necessary items also don't pack inside as nicely as the original Jb, which means you have the junk rattling around inside the pot (b/c it doesn't fit tightly), and the cannister to carry.

 

An issue I do have with the jetboil is that they don't 'simmer' well. Not so much an issue if I'm only heating water, but in playing with the larger pot, it's just not made to do anything like that in an acceptable fashion. So, wow... I can just heat MORE water faster. Big woo.

 

I have been thinking about getting something smaller and lighter, maybe like TotemLake's stove... Just for the s&g factor.

 

MSR also has a new 'stove system' but that's a little much for what I need.

 

On the other hand, they're gadgets. I like them.

 

michelle

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I'm not sure how many stoves I have any more. I think I still have a simple cheap alcohol one. I have 2 pop can alcohol ones I recently made one is good the other needs some tweaking.

 

I think I finally got rid of a couple that had no name but were the heavy brass tank type that use white gas. Too smelly getting them lit.

 

there might be a butane one in the garage somewhere too, although I can't check on any of them cause my daughter's stuff has all my camping and fishing gear blocked in.

 

I have 2 favorites. One is my Coleman Peak 1 with a pressurized tank and the other is just for camping in my truck. Its propane and I hook it and a lantern up to a 5 gal. tank.

 

I haven't hiked on an overnighter for a very long time. I miss it very much.

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I made my own Pepsi Can Stove. Well actually, I made FIVE of them! It was a lot of fun and the quality of the finished product improved each time. In addition to the stove, I made a titanium burner/pot stand and windscreen. The whole thing breaks down and fits inside of my 0.9 liter bugaboo pot. If you check out my cache history you will see a string of recent finds along the Maryland portion of the Appalachian Trail. Until this trip I'd always used a more conventional (aka - "heavy") Coleman propane single-burner stove. On this three-day trip I only used my little alcohol stove and let me tell you, it worked like a champ! I had to use a little more forethought when firing it up to use fuel efficiently since it's not throttleable and takes a few minutes to relight should it burn out while cooking.

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From the OP, above:

 

...If you get into making your own Alcohol it will cost you about $0.60 cents per quart. and you can drink that too...

 

Having made my own stove and then forking over the five bucks for denatured alcohol at Walmart, the idea of actually making my own alcohol appeals to me! I'm not interested in moonshinin' or even drinking the ethanol myself but as a do-it-yourselfer there's just something cool about taking the homemade burner to the next level. Do you have any suggestions or possible links to sites that offer fermentation/distillation techniques?

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I don't do backpacking or backwoods camping-- just the state park variety. As a result, I don't need anything particularly small or lightweight. I have a Coleman 2-burner propane stove that I got at Wal-mart a few years ago. I grew up going on camping trips with a much older model that used fuel tanks that Dad had to pump before each use. The sound of the pumping was the way I knew it was time to start waking up in the morning when we were camping. So now I have the nice easy updated model for when I get to go camping. Going next week, in fact. Need to go check to see if I have any fuel for it.

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I don't do backpacking or backwoods camping-- just the state park variety. As a result, I don't need anything particularly small or lightweight. I have a Coleman 2-burner propane stove that I got at Wal-mart a few years ago. I grew up going on camping trips with a much older model that used fuel tanks that Dad had to pump before each use. The sound of the pumping was the way I knew it was time to start waking up in the morning when we were camping. So now I have the nice easy updated model for when I get to go camping. Going next week, in fact. Need to go check to see if I have any fuel for it.

Backpacking and car camping are two very different subjects. I’ve never been a fan of car camping because I really don’t see the point in plunking down a tent alongside the road and pretending to be homeless for a night or two. I prefer to hike in, where I can’t hear traffic or some yahoo in the next campsite who thinks everyone wants to listen to hip-hop all night.

 

Nevertheless, sometimes a long drive necessitates spending the night at the trailhead to allow an early start in the morning. For that I picked up one of these, a Weber Q120:

516001_lg_1.jpg

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What ever happened to a good old camp fire

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Backpacking and car camping are two very different subjects. I’ve never been a fan of car camping because I really don’t see the point in plunking down a tent alongside the road and pretending to be homeless for a night or two.

 

That's odd...I dont' see the point of lugging a bunch of stuff back into the middle of the woods when I can stay at a pleasant (and usually pretty quiet) camp site within a few hundred yards of my car ;)

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Backpacking and car camping are two very different subjects. I’ve never been a fan of car camping because I really don’t see the point in plunking down a tent alongside the road and pretending to be homeless for a night or two.

 

That's odd...I dont' see the point of lugging a bunch of stuff back into the middle of the woods when I can stay at a pleasant (and usually pretty quiet) camp site within a few hundred yards of my car ;)

:D

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LOL- I was just thinking the same thing. We try to avoid summer weekends and quite often have the whole campground to ourselves. Nothin' better than all the beauty of the backcountry with running water, showers and real toilets!

 

For that we've got a coleman that has a griddle/bbq grate on one side and a burner next to it, the best upgrade I've ever made!

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LOL- I was just thinking the same thing. We try to avoid summer weekends and quite often have the whole campground to ourselves. Nothin' better than all the beauty of the backcountry with running water, showers and real toilets!

 

For that we've got a coleman that has a griddle/bbq grate on one side and a burner next to it, the best upgrade I've ever made!

 

Showers?!

 

For our burb-camping out on the dunes, we have a Weber Q 200 grill... Not my fave thing, but it's great for cooking up a side of beef for people that eat that kind of thing. Generally I find it's too much work, and I'd rather be out riding. (Food is never at the top of my to-do list.)

 

We MIGHT use it car camping with a whole butt-load of kids this summer... but I'm thinking camp fire and some sticks.

 

Actually, what I'm really thinking is that I'm not going to be the one doing all the cooking so I don't care what everyone else does.

 

;)

 

A friend has the Coleman grill as you've mentioned. I'm not sure if he's actually used it, but the good reviews are REALLY good... and the bad reviews are REALLY bad.

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I don't do backpacking or backwoods camping-- just the state park variety. As a result, I don't need anything particularly small or lightweight. I have a Coleman 2-burner propane stove that I got at Wal-mart a few years ago. I grew up going on camping trips with a much older model that used fuel tanks that Dad had to pump before each use. The sound of the pumping was the way I knew it was time to start waking up in the morning when we were camping. So now I have the nice easy updated model for when I get to go camping. Going next week, in fact. Need to go check to see if I have any fuel for it.

Backpacking and car camping are two very different subjects. I’ve never been a fan of car camping because I really don’t see the point in plunking down a tent alongside the road and pretending to be homeless for a night or two. I prefer to hike in, where I can’t hear traffic or some yahoo in the next campsite who thinks everyone wants to listen to hip-hop all night.

 

Nevertheless, sometimes a long drive necessitates spending the night at the trailhead to allow an early start in the morning. For that I picked up one of these, a Weber Q120:

516001_lg_1.jpg

 

That's a great little grill. On the heavy side, but it does up a steak real nice. I have it on the deck and use it as a backup for the big Weber. If the big one runs out of gas, or we are cooking too much to fit on one grill, we fire up the baby Weber. It's negative is that the grill surface is a bit tough to clean, but overall it does a great job.

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I don't do backpacking or backwoods camping-- just the state park variety. As a result, I don't need anything particularly small or lightweight. I have a Coleman 2-burner propane stove that I got at Wal-mart a few years ago. I grew up going on camping trips with a much older model that used fuel tanks that Dad had to pump before each use. The sound of the pumping was the way I knew it was time to start waking up in the morning when we were camping. So now I have the nice easy updated model for when I get to go camping. Going next week, in fact. Need to go check to see if I have any fuel for it.

Backpacking and car camping are two very different subjects. I’ve never been a fan of car camping because I really don’t see the point in plunking down a tent alongside the road and pretending to be homeless for a night or two. I prefer to hike in, where I can’t hear traffic or some yahoo in the next campsite who thinks everyone wants to listen to hip-hop all night.

 

Nevertheless, sometimes a long drive necessitates spending the night at the trailhead to allow an early start in the morning. For that I picked up one of these, a Weber Q120:

516001_lg_1.jpg

 

That's a great little grill. On the heavy side, but it does up a steak real nice. I have it on the deck and use it as a backup for the big Weber. If the big one runs out of gas, or we are cooking too much to fit on one grill, we fire up the baby Weber. It's negative is that the grill surface is a bit tough to clean, but overall it does a great job.

I looked at the Coleman but if you try to cook with the lid closed the handle will melt and the paint will burn off the lid. That was a deal breaker for me.

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From the OP, above:

 

...If you get into making your own Alcohol it will cost you about $0.60 cents per quart. and you can drink that too...

 

...Having made my own stove and then forking over the five bucks for denatured alcohol at Walmart, the idea of actually making my own alcohol appeals to me!...

 

After years of lugging around canisters and stoves, I switched a couple years ago to a trusty homemade "Guinness can stove" with gas line antifreeze (YELLOW Bottle) as my fuel. I also cut my pack weight by several pounds after I switched to my "antigravitygear.com" kitchen set-up. Without the fuel , my entire kitchen setup weighs less than one pound.

 

All the guys I hike with use the yellow bottle gas line antifreeze (cheaper than denatured alcohol and burns about the same)....fairly cheap, usually less than a buck at Wally-world on sale, and a bottle lasts me about two-three days in the woods, one ounce burns from 5-7 minutes. This is usually plenty of time to heat 2-3 cups of water. Since I do mostly "freezer bag" cooking/dehydrated/freeze dried meals etc. all I really need to do is heat water.

 

Diana (BBG)

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A white gas Whisperlite, and I still regularly use my circa 1977 SVEA 123. Something about that sound...

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A white gas Whisperlite, and I still regularly use my circa 1977 SVEA 123. Something about that sound...

I always wanted a SVEA but for one reason or another I always ended up buying some thing else. These are some of the stoves, and cookware, I've had through the years.

 

campstovessz1.jpg

 

I think most of you, that do any backpacking, will recognize one of two of these and you old timers will recognize most of them but I would be, at least a little, surprized if anyone can name all six of them.

 

Great topic, I loved Criminal's description of car camping. :o

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We have an esbit that we use occasionally, but most of the time it is a MSR Pocket Rocket. It, the fuel and a lighter pack in my pot, so I love the portability. I almost always do dehydrated food or freezer bag stuff so I am basically boiling water and it works great for this. Living in the southeast, I rarely have to worry about temperature when we camp but I have used it down around freezing and it was ok. A couple of us are getting together Wednesday night to build the Guinness can alcohol stoves, if it all works out I will post some pics of the finished product.

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A white gas Whisperlite, and I still regularly use my circa 1977 SVEA 123. Something about that sound...

I always wanted a SVEA but for one reason or another I always ended up buying some thing else. These are some of the stoves, and cookware, I've had through the years.

 

campstovessz1.jpg

 

I think most of you, that do any backpacking, will recognize one of two of these and you old timers will recognize most of them but I would be, at least a little, surprized if anyone can name all six of them.

 

Great topic, I loved Criminal's description of car camping. :ph34r:

 

The stove that is blue in color, Is that a globe trotter? from camping gaz? I am triing to find the canister marked gt106 (90g)

fuel canisters for mine. I have @ left and need to get some more for my motorcycle trip. If anyone runs across this canisters please email me of post here. thanks

Edited by Howling/Pepper Chef
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The stove that is blue in color, Is that a globe trotter? from camping gaz? I am triing to find the canister marked gt106 (90g)

fuel canisters for mine. I have @ left and need to get some more for my motorcycle trip. If anyone runs across this canisters please email me of post here. thanks

 

I was at Academy Sports last night and noticed that they carry the fuel cannisters you are looking for.

 

Hope that helps.

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The stove that is blue in color, Is that a globe trotter? from camping gaz? I am triing to find the canister marked gt106 (90g)

fuel canisters for mine. I have @ left and need to get some more for my motorcycle trip. If anyone runs across this canisters please email me of post here. thanks

 

The blue stove isn't called a globe trotter or at least it wasn't in 1972 when I bought it. It uses a camping gaz C206 cartridge (190gr). The information I found indicates that the gt106 cartridge is discontinued and not available anymore, at least not in the USA. Sorry. :)

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Last wednesday I spent the evening with fellow cachers FullCT and PPPorch building alcohol stoves, here are the results of the alcohol cooking stove construction and experiments. First of all, they were far easier to construct than I imagined, although it took us three hours to construct these three, I am sure that any subsequent attempts will go much faster. We spent alot of time experimenting with different construction techniques, and we had to empty the Guinness cans first which took a little while. We followed the instructions found here, and only modified technique, not content. So here they are:

 

f5e52119-dcc2-4804-844c-99d5693da5f5.jpg

 

and a shot of our work area with everything we used in the construction:

 

fddb8204-3ab9-4046-9269-5512aefeda61.jpg

 

I was pleased with the way they turned out, and the first time we lit one up it was breathtaking. At first it is not that impressive, just looks like a can of sterno burning, but as the temp rises and the alcohol vaporizes it suddenly jumps to life in a most satisfying way.

 

8713f904-8905-4d94-a2cd-264fb39b5707.jpg

 

and one more:

 

8ee7b6f1-6673-489d-9105-5ac5fbd601ff.jpg

 

Pretty cool, huh?

 

Once we had working stoves, we tested various fuels in them. This testing was decidedly non-scientific, but fun.

The stoves worked best on denatured alcohol, with a nice clean blue flame and no residue. The above pictures are a denatured alcohol burn.

Only slightly less effective was methyl alcohol, still a nice blue clean burn with no residue.

We then tried 190 proof Everclear Grain Alcohol. It works and produces a cooler flame with more yellow, but burned away with noticeable residue. It did take longer for it to vaporize and begin to cook, but once it did it was fine, it also has some medicinal purposes, so you have to take that into account.

Our last test was with Bacardi 151 proof rum. I can attest that it does work, although it takes a long time for it to vaporize and begin to flame out of the burners. It also produces a yellow/brown residue in the stove, on the other hand, it certainly smelled nice while it burned, and made everyone for miles around crave Bananas Foster.

 

This week, I constructed a pot stand out of an old hanger, but I am not thrilled with it, so I am thinking of building a tri-fold windscreen/pot stand instead.

 

On the whole these were a blast to build and I have bored everyone I know to tears by showing these off over the last week, it is just to cool when they begin to cook. I can boil 2 cups of water in less than ten minutes on about 1-1.5 tablespoons of fuel and it is super light. Great little project, and if you don't want to take the time to build your own, I found a place online that sells them for $12.00, but I suggest going for the simple build, it is a lot of fun and very rewarding.

Edited by Monkeybrad
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I've been using the Peak 1, but as most only boil water to reconstitute dehydrated food or heat up an MRE. One of these homebrew stoves would work for me just fine.

 

I'm the scoutmaster of the local BSA troop, this looks like a good project for the boys. I think we'll give it a shot up at summer camp for an evening project.

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Last wednesday I spent the evening with fellow cachers FullCT and PPPorch building alcohol stoves, here are the results of the alcohol cooking stove construction and experiments. First of all, they were far easier to construct than I imagined, although it took us three hours to construct these three, I am sure that any subsequent attempts will go much faster. We spent alot of time experimenting with different construction techniques, and we had to empty the Guinness cans first which took a little while. We followed the instructions found here, and only modified technique, not content. So here they are:

 

f5e52119-dcc2-4804-844c-99d5693da5f5.jpg

 

and a shot of our work area with everything we used in the construction:

 

fddb8204-3ab9-4046-9269-5512aefeda61.jpg

 

I was pleased with the way they turned out, and the first time we lit one up it was breathtaking. At first it is not that impressive, just looks like a can of sterno burning, but as the temp rises and the alcohol vaporizes it suddenly jumps to life in a most satisfying way.

 

8713f904-8905-4d94-a2cd-264fb39b5707.jpg

 

and one more:

 

8ee7b6f1-6673-489d-9105-5ac5fbd601ff.jpg

 

Pretty cool, huh?

 

Once we had working stoves, we tested various fuels in them. This testing was decidedly non-scientific, but fun.

The stoves worked best on denatured alcohol, with a nice clean blue flame and no residue. The above pictures are a denatured alcohol burn.

Only slightly less effective was methyl alcohol, still a nice blue clean burn with no residue.

We then tried 190 proof Everclear Grain Alcohol. It works and produces a cooler flame with more yellow, but burned away with noticeable residue. It did take longer for it to vaporize and begin to cook, but once it did it was fine, it also has some medicinal purposes, so you have to take that into account.

Our last test was with Bacardi 151 proof rum. I can attest that it does work, although it takes a long time for it to vaporize and begin to flame out of the burners. It also produces a yellow/brown residue in the stove, on the other hand, it certainly smelled nice while it burned, and made everyone for miles around crave Bananas Foster.

 

This week, I constructed a pot stand out of an old hanger, but I am not thrilled with it, so I am thinking of building a tri-fold windscreen/pot stand instead.

 

On the whole these were a blast to build and I have bored everyone I know to tears by showing these off over the last week, it is just to cool when they begin to cook. I can boil 2 cups of water in less than ten minutes on about 1-1.5 tablespoons of fuel and it is super light. Great little project, and if you don't want to take the time to build your own, I found a place online that sells them for $12.00, but I suggest going for the simple build, it is a lot of fun and very rewarding.

 

Very cool, Now next Wednesday try building a side Jet Pressurized one. They work totally different and are a lot of fun to build also.

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An example of a pressurized stove, this needs a pot stand

 

b76583ab-f979-448b-a151-c9b607643bef.jpg

 

I made a few of these and they are hotter and faster than the open top type. The use less fuel too. They wont simmer but they also don't crush as easy. If you do not want to put in the nut to close the hole you can cover the center hole with a penny and it works almost as well as the thumb screw.

Edited by Michael
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Hey I just discovered this hiking and backpacking board, I wish I had seen it sooner!

 

I make YACC stoves with a modification of cutting off the top of the can. I take one on all my dayhikes so I can have a hot cup of tea.

 

I've got so many alcohol stoves that I am starting to use them for swag in my new caches.

 

This little stove has been on dozens of dayhikes with me.

 

firststove.jpg

 

Here is my pile of stove making stuff and it's grown since the picture was taken

 

stoveshop.jpg

 

All this stuff (and an ammo can) is on my kitchen table right now.

Edited by luckykoi
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All the guys I hike with use the yellow bottle gas line antifreeze (cheaper than denatured alcohol and burns about the same)....fairly cheap, usually less than a buck at Wally-world on sale, and a bottle lasts me about two-three days in the woods, one ounce burns from 5-7 minutes. This is usually plenty of time to heat 2-3 cups of water. Since I do mostly "freezer bag" cooking/dehydrated/freeze dried meals etc. all I really need to do is heat water.

 

Diana (BBG)

 

I think the HEET is slightly more toxic then denatured alcohol. I know the stuff in the big cans of denatured alcohol smells different when it is burning. I go through so much of it playing with my different stove designs that I go ahead and buy the 1/2 gallon cans.

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All the guys I hike with use the yellow bottle gas line antifreeze (cheaper than denatured alcohol and burns about the same)....fairly cheap, usually less than a buck at Wally-world on sale, and a bottle lasts me about two-three days in the woods, one ounce burns from 5-7 minutes. This is usually plenty of time to heat 2-3 cups of water. Since I do mostly "freezer bag" cooking/dehydrated/freeze dried meals etc. all I really need to do is heat water.

 

Diana (BBG)

 

I think the HEET is slightly more toxic then denatured alcohol. I know the stuff in the big cans of denatured alcohol smells different when it is burning. I go through so much of it playing with my different stove designs that I go ahead and buy the 1/2 gallon cans.

 

Heet is a LOT more toxic than Denatured Alcohol as it is basically 100% Methanol. Denatured is basically 80-90% Ethanol with the rest being something to make it poisonous so you cant drink at and don't pay the tax that way. The other down side of Heet is there is less BTUs in the same amount of Heet than in Denatured Alcohol so it takes longer, not much but its still longer, then denatured alcohol.

 

Heet has about 9000 BTUs vs Denatured Alcohol which has about 12,000 BTUs. The advantage of Heet is you can but it just about anywhere. My local 7-11 has it in stock. So all you need to do is make sure you are properly ventilated.

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Here is my six ounce cookset

 

That is the sh*t.

 

I'm just saying...

 

michelle

 

Is that a good thing? ;)

 

My system has changed a lot since I posted that. I'm using the YACC stove again and a different pot lid. The pot lid pulled apart. Now for the lid I use the orginal can top cut off with one of the newer can openers that does not leave a sharp edge. The can pot holds up better that way because it keeps it's original rim.

 

Next week I might be using something else... I keep experimenting.

Edited by luckykoi
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I mentioned my Pepsi can stove with the feather-lite titanium burner/pot stand and windscreen and thought it would be nice to share some photos. Thanks to CurmudgeonlyGal for the hint about uploading pictures!

 

Photo 1: The Entire Cookset

 

Photo 2: The Stuff Inside

 

Photo 3: All Laid Out

 

Photo 4: Assembling the Burner/Pot Stand

 

Photo 5: Inserting the Pepsi Can Burner

 

Photo 6: Putting Burner/Pot Stand into Windscreen

 

Photo 7: Detail of Assembled Burner/Pot Stand

 

Photo 8: All Fired Up!

 

Photo 9: Soups On!

Edited by Shiraz-mataz
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Those links wont work becasue they send the person to their own part of their account section. when I click on them it sends me to my gallery.

Edited by Michael
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I mentioned my Pepsi can stove with the feather-lite titanium burner/pot stand and windscreen and thought it would be nice to share some photos. Thanks to CurmudgeonlyGal for the hint about uploading pictures!

 

Photo 9: Soups On!

When done right, you should have a URL similar to the one in the tags (but closed with square brackets i.e.[command] [/command]):

img]http://img.geocaching.com/user/115661_400.jpg[/img

115661_400.jpg

 

The link you used is a dynamic page and that URL cannot be used to display images.

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Thanks for the html tips... you young'uns and your fancy book learnin'...

 

I edited the link in the message above so they work now. What I'd like to know is that when I uploaded the images I added a description of what the picture was about. Where can that be seen now? (not trying to make this an html course - feel free to PM me if you know the answer)

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Thanks for the html tips... you young'uns and your fancy book learnin'...

 

I edited the link in the message above so they work now. What I'd like to know is that when I uploaded the images I added a description of what the picture was about. Where can that be seen now? (not trying to make this an html course - feel free to PM me if you know the answer)

If you use the little tree icon (that's the image command) in your web editor when typing the message, the picture will come in like my avatar did, then you just type plain english above or below (preferably above) the image command

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reactor.jpg

 

I work at an outdoor retailer here in Spokane, WA named Mountain Gear

so... I have seen the future so to speak!

 

There will be a new stove coming out here in the next few weeks called the MSR Reactor

 

Currently no stores have it, including ours, but it will be in stock soon.

 

The friendly people at MSR brought one to us and showed us how it works. The flame burns bright orange and sounds similar, yet not as loud, to a jet engine (afterburner).

 

The stoves come with a complete titanium cookset that adds just onces to the overall weight. The whole system is less than 2lbs and runs off a fuel mixture that is relatively inexpensive

 

Here are the specs...

 

Minimum weight: 21 ounces/595 grams

Packaged weight: 21.6 ounces/612 grams

Fuel type: MSR IsoPro/MSR Canister Fuel (Europe)

Boil time: 3 minutes per liter

Release date: March 2007 (although I also heard January 2007 from one Cascade Designs rep)

Suggested retail price: $149.95

Edited by Onewheeler
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Its MSR's version of the Jet-Boil. A little different but the same basic thing. It boils water really fast. Like the Jet-boil its not for regular cooking. Its a really fast really efficient water boiler. Which is a good thing at times :o

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