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COINTEST: Share What you know about New Zealand & WIN!

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Lamb is naturally one of the most popular traditional dishes. Often cooked as a juicy roast with garlic and rosemary and served slightly pink with a tangy mint sauce, lamb is generally on the menu of almost every restaurant in the country. Hogget, or one-year-old lamb, is more tasty than younger lamb but not as strong as mutton. Beef is excellent and reasonably priced in restaurants--and nothing beats sizzling, thick juicy steaks and sausages, crisp salads, chilled wine or beer, good company, and cicadas singing from the trees at a traditional New Zealand "barby." Chicken or "chook" is another favorite. Sausages or "bangers" come in all shapes and sizes and are most frequently served battered and deep-fried at takeaways. New Zealanders are also partial to farm-raised or "home-grown" venison (expensive unless bought patty-form in a venison burger), veal, duck and pheasant (some of the sporting lodge restaurants specialize in game), and wild pork. If you like experimenting with different tastes, try muttonbird—it's a Maori delicacy that tastes like fish-flavored chicken!

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New Zealand

Kina Pie (Shellfish Pie)

 

Serves 4

 

* 2 c Fresh Kina tongue

* 2 Rashers Bacon

* 1 c Breadcrumbs

 

Kina or sea eggs are a staple Maori food for those fortunate enough to live close to the sea. Kina is found at low tide in rock crevices and under ledges of rock. They should only be gathered however in summer when they are sweet. Maori lore says it is best for them to be gathered at low tide on the first, second and third days after a full moon. When opened the shell will be found to contain a mass of fine grit and shell, a purple membrane and five tongues which are red. The tongues should be scraped from the shell with a spoon taking care not to include any membrane or grit.

 

1. Place alternate layers of kina and breadcrumbs, into a buttered Pie dish finishing with a layer of breadcrumbs.

 

2. Cover with chopped bacon.

 

3. Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes until the crumbs and bacon are crisp and the tongues are cooked.

 

from:

Kiwi Cookbook

by Alan Armstrong

Seven Seas Publishing Pty, 1968

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They have vehicle safety inspections in New Zealand just like in the U.S., except

they call them Warrant of Fitness (WOF)

 

Safety inspections for private motor vehicles

A warrant of fitness (WoF) is a periodic safety inspection that is compulsory for light vehicles.

 

A light vehicle is a car, station wagon, van or 4WD vehicle. It can also be a moped, motorcycle or similar, including a trike.

 

All vehicles registered less than six years ago must have a WoF inspection every 12 months. All other vehicles must have a WoF inspection every six months. As an authorised agent of Land Transport New Zealand, VTNZ follows the Vehicle Inspection Requirements Manual (VIRM) issued by Land Transport New Zealand.

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BUMP :huh:

 

Here we go gathering bumps in May . . . .

 

Hang on, that doesn't sound right :blink:

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Some words/phases used in New Zealand and their meaning...

 

ice block: popsicle

prang: minor vehicle accident

push bike: bicycle

take-aways: New Zealand term for "take-outs" or food "to go".

torch: flashlight

tramping: hiking

tyre: tire

sarnie: sandwich

pinky bar: a chocolate-covered marshmallow confection

pikelet: small pancake often served with jam and whipped cream

panel beater: auto body shop

jersey: sweater

flog: steal, nick

footpath: pavement or sidewalk

dairy: "corner" store originally only selling milk, bread, papers, convenience foods and dairy produce, and until the past decade or so, the only shop allowed to open 7 days a week. Still is the only shop allowed to open on Christmas day and Good Friday, for a few hours, and without a special licence.

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Driving in New Zealand...They can start driving at the age of 15

Driver’s licence laws, 3 types of licence

- Learners licence

- Restricted licence

- Full licence

 

A Learners licence can be obtained from the age of 15 onwards. The person has to study the road rules and sit a test. If they pass they get a learners licence. They are then allowed to take driving lessons with a person that holds a Full drivers licence. When they are ready they can then sit the practical driving test. If they pass the test they will be issued a restricted licence. They will have to wait until it arrives in the mail before they can start to drive. There are several rules regarding restricted licenses.

- The student can not take passengers unless the passenger holds a Full New Zealand Drivers licence

- The student may not drive after 10pm

- The student has to hold a “clean” (no traffic offences such as speeding or too many parking tickets) for a minimum of 18 months before they can obtain a Full drivers licence

- A Full licence enables the person to drive a motor vehicle at any time with passengers

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I have a feeling that we're getting closer to the "NUMBER", but we need more people

to post....

 

Here's another fact...

 

In 1917, Sir Henry Wigram forms the first New Zealand commercial airline, the Canterbury Aviation Company.

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I know I'm close (or at least I have an idea what the number might be, so here goes, I'll

start posting)...

 

Puysegur Point is located in the far southwest of the South Island of New Zealand. It lies within Fiordland National Park on the southern head of Preservation Inlet. It lies 145 kilometres west-northwest of Invercargill. It is the site of a lighthouse station now automated but for many years the home of 3 married permanent lighthouse keepers. The original wooden lighthouse was burnt down in 1943 by a man who had recently left a psychiatric hospital and made his way down to Cole Island across the fjord from the lighthouse. He decided the light was a deliberate plot to keep him awake at night by shining in his window so took matters into his own hands. He held all the keepers hostage with a rifle, smashed the radio telephone and set fire to the lighthouse. The concrete lighthouse which replaced it has now in turn been replaced by two automated beacons.

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The Hollyford Track is one of New Zealand's best known tramping tracks. Located at the northern edge of Fiordland, in the southwestern South Island, it is unusual among Fiordland's major tracks in that it is largely flat and accessible year-round.

 

The track is 56 kilometres in length, and takes four days to walk one way. It runs roughly south-north, its southern end being accessible by road 15 kilometres to the east of the Homer Tunnel, and its northern end being at the Tasman Sea coast at Martins Bay, north of Milford Sound.

 

(Remember, in New Zealand, tramping is hiking)

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Kingston is a small town at the southernmost end of Lake Wakatipu in New Zealand's South Island. It is 40 kilometres south of Queenstown by a road which winds between the lake to the west and The Remarkables mountains to the east. It is 70 kilometres north of Lumsden, and close to the headwaters of the Mataura River.

 

It is also the most inland town in New Zealand.

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The Solander Islands are a small chain of uninhabited volcanic islets lying at 46°34′S, 166°53′E, close to the western end of the Foveaux Strait in southern New Zealand.

The islands are remnants of an isolated extinct Pleistocene volcano with andesite rocks one to two million years old. They lie on a bank with depths less than 100 m, but are separated from the continental shelf around Foveaux Strait by a 4 km narrow trough with depths in excess of 200 m (at least 237 m). Therefore, the islands are included in the New Zealand Outlying Islands, despite their proximity to the mainland. The Solander Islands are the only New Zealand volcanic land features related to the subduction of the Australian Plate beneath the Pacific Plate

 

solander.jpg

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Here's a photo of one of my favorite places to visit near Christchurch, NZ. It's Cave Rock in Sumner:

cave_rock.jpg

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This is really a neat looking waterfall

 

falls.jpg

 

Sutherland Falls, located on the South Island, off the famous Milford Track, at 580 metres (1,904 feet) is listed as the highest waterfall in New Zealand. This has recently been hotly disputed, with an unofficial listing for Browne Falls, at 619 metres (2031 feet).

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The Titi or Muttonbird Islands are located in the far south of New Zealand.

 

There are two chains, both of them simply referred to as the Muttonbird or Titi islands. The northern chain is located in Foveaux Strait, to the northeast of Stewart Island, between it and Ruapuke Island; the southern chain is located to the southwest of Stewart Island.

 

The two chains are both uninhabited, and are named for the traditional harvesting of the Sooty Shearwater by Māori. These birds are also known as "Muttonbirds" due to their vaguely mutton-like taste.

 

In May 2006, the northeastern chain was the scene of tragedy when a fishing boat capsized with the loss of six lives, close to Womens Island.

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Both the North and South Islands of New Zealand are in the same time zone.

 

Right now it's 11:15 PM on Monday night here and it's way past my bedtime.

It's already tomorrow in New Zealand, it's 3:15 PM on TUESDAY. (If I were

there, I'd already be home from another day of school).

Good night!

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kakapo.jpg

 

The Kakapo is a species of nocturnal parrot, endemic to New Zealand. It is notable for being the world's only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, and the only parrot to have a lek breeding system.

All surviving Kakapo are kept on two predator-free islands, Chalky Island in south-west Fiordland and Codfish Island/Whenuahou near Stewart Island/Rakiura, where they are closely monitored.

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I've never studied anything about New Zealand. From what I seen on Wikipedia, it looks like an interesting place to visit with some beautiful countryside. Some day maybe I'll be lucky enough to go there and see it for myself.

Edited by 501_Gang

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With a mean annual rainfall of 6813 mm on 182 days a year, a high level even for the West Coast, Milford Sound is known as the wettest place in New Zealand and one of the wettest in the world.

Milford Sound runs 15 kilometres inland from the Tasman Sea and is surrounded by sheer rock faces that rise 1200 metres or more on either side. Lush rain forests cling precariously to these cliffs, while seals, penguins, and dolphins frequent the waters.

Milford Sound, also known as Piopiotahi in Maori, is located in the south west of New Zealand's South Island. Although called Milford Sound, it is more accurately classified as a fjord. Milford Sound, the most famous tourist site of New Zealand.

 

milford.jpg

 

This is a picture of Milford Sound. Mitre peak is in the center.

Edited by stellarscapes

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Invercargill is the home to New Zealand's only indoor cycling velodrome. The indoor 250m wooden velodrome is home to Track Cycling in Southland and is currently the fastest track in the country. The Invercargill Licensing Trust supports the Velodrome which is situated at Stadium Southland.

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Stonehenge Aotearoa, a full-scale working adaptation of Stonehenge, is intended to inspire New Zealanders to explore and experience for themselves how technologies of ancient times were used, and still can be used, to give practical and detailed information on the seasons, time and navigation.

Situated in the Wairarapa countryside, a short distance from Wellington, Stonehenge Aotearoa is a window into the past where the visitor can rediscover the knowledge of their ancestors. It incorporates ancient Egyptian, Babylonian and Celtic astronomy, Polynesian navigation, and Maori starlore.

 

stoney.jpg

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Tasman Empire Airways Limited (TEAL) was renamed Air New Zealand in 1965.

On July 20, 1965, the first commercial international flight into the unfinished Auckland International Airport was an Air New Zealand DC8, landing after a non-stop 13 hour flight from California.

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Invercargill (Waihōpai in Māori) is the southernmost and westernmost city in New Zealand, and one of the southernmost settlements in the world.

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West Cape (45.9060° S 166.4276° E) is the westernmost point in the main chain of islands of New Zealand. It is located in the far southwest of the South Island, within Fiordland National Park, between Dusky Sound and Chalky Inlet.

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Extreme points in New Zealand

 

Northernmost point — Nugent Island, in the Kermadec Islands

Southernmost point — Jacquemart Island (off the south coast of Campbell Island) in the Campbell Island group

Westernmost point — Cape Lovitt, Auckland Islands

Easternmost point — Kahuitara Point, Pitt Island, in the Chatham Islands

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In April/May 2005, The New Zealand American Submarine Ring of Fire 2005 (NZASRoF'05) Expedition explored active submarine volcanoes in the Kermadec Arc, located north of New Zealand, with a pair of manned submersibles. This is a subduction zone where tectonic plates converge and a chain of restless volcanoes is formed along the boundary. The dive sites chosen were at volcanoes that showed evidence of having vigorous seafloor hot springs. This evidence comes from previous New Zealand / American expeditions to the area that mapped the seafloor and surveyed the ocean above each volcano for signs of hydrothermal plumes. Seafloor hot springs are dynamic environments where heat and chemicals from inside volcanoes are vented into the ocean and support unique biological communities. Most of the dive sites have never been visited before and so the potential for exciting discoveries was high.

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Coca-Cola was introduced into New Zealand in 1939. Local production began in 1944 and in 1953 the Coca-Cola licence was acquired by Innes Industries and 10 years later, with three other companies, it become part of the Oasis Group of Companies. In December 1989 CCA purchased The Coca-Cola Company's 50% interest in Oasis Industries. Six months later CCA announced the acquisition of Coca-Cola Bottlers Ltd, giving it 100% ownership of Oasis Industries. The Oasis operation was then merged with the licence in Wellington to develop a single CCA operation in New Zealand.

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Slope Point is the southernmost point of the South Island of New Zealand. Located at 46°40′40″S, 169°0′11″E, Slope Point lies just south of the small settlements of Waikawa and Haldane, near the southwestern edge of the Catlins and Toetoes Bay. It is 70 km (40 mi) east of Invercargill.

 

The land around Slope Point is used for sheep farming; there are no houses anywhere nearby. Eroded cliffs drop down to the sea below. An AA signpost there shows the distance to the Equator and the South Pole, and a small solar-powered lighthouse stands on farmland.

 

There is no road to Slope Point; it must be reached by a 20 minute walk following dilapidated yellow markers. There is no public access during the lambing season (September – October).

 

slope.jpg

 

(edited to add picture)

Edited by stellarscapes

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Well, that's it for me tonight, I've already posted on the # that I'm guessing Team Chelmo

picked. My guess was post #333 for the number of caches that he found, that guess was based

upon his hint that "the number increased by 1" and he found a new cache that day.

If I'm wrong, that's okay - I learned alot about New Zealand and would love to

visit some day.

Edited by stellarscapes

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A little "Kiwispeak" for y'all:

A - C

Ads - tv commercials, advertisments

Anklebiter - toddler, small child

Aotearoa - Maori name for New Zealand meaning land of the long white cloud

Arvo - afternoon

Bach - holiday home

Banger - sausage, as in bangers and mash

Barbie - barbecue

Big smoke - large town or city

Bit of dag - hard case, comedian, person with character

Bitser - mongrel dog

Bloke - man

Brickie - bricklayer

Brown eye - to flash your naked butt at someone

Boy-racer - name given to a young man who drives a fast car with a loud stereo

Bring a plate - means bring a dish of food to share

Bugger - dadgum!

Bungy - kiwi slang for elastic strap, as in Bungy Jumping

Caravan - mobile home that you tow behind your car

Cardi - cardigan

Cast - immobilised, unable to get to your feet

Cheers - thanks

Cheerio - goodbye

Cheerio - name for a cocktail sausage

Chocka - full, overflowing

Chook - chicken

Chick - slang word for woman/female

Chips - deep fried slices of potato but much thicker than a french fry

Chippy - builder, carpenter

Chrissy pressies - Christmas presents

Chuddy - chewing gum

Chunder - vomit, throw up

Cockie - farmer

Cotton buds - Q-tips

Creek - small stream

Crib - bach,

Cuppa - cup of tea, as in cuppa tea

Cuz - cousin, family

CF30

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A little more "Kiwispeak" for 'yall:

D - J

De facto - name used for a couple who are not married but are living together

Ding - small dent in a vehicle

Dole - unemployment benefit

Dodgy - bad, unreliable, not good

Down the gurgler - failed plan

Drongo - stupid fool, idiot

Drop your gear - take your clothes off, get undressed

Dunny - toilet, bathroom, lavatory

Duvet - quilt, doona

Ear bashing - someone talking incessantly

Entree - appetizer, hors d'oeurve

Fizz Boat - small power boat

Fizzy drink - soda pop

Flannel - wash cloth, face cloth

Flat - apartment, name for rental accommodation that is shared

Flicks - movies, picture theatre

Flog - steal, rob

Footie - rugby union or league, as in "going to watch the footie"

Full tit - going very fast, using all your power, as in "he was running full tit"

G'day - universal kiwi greeting, also spelled gidday

Get the willies - overcome with trepidation

Going bush - take a break, become reclusive

Good on ya, mate! - congratulations, well done, proud of someone

Good as gold - feeling good, not a problem, yes

Greasies - fish and chips

Gumboots or gummies - rubber boots, wellingtons

Handle - pint of beer

Happy as larry - very happy

Hard case - amusing, funny person

Hard yakka - hard work

Hollywood - to fake or exaggerate an injury on the sportsfield

Home and hosed - safe, successfully finished, completed,

Hoon - Young adult driving fast

Hosing down - heavy rain, raining heavily

Hottie - hot water bottle

How's it going mate? - kiwi greeting

Iceblock - popsicle, Ice Stick

Jandal - thongs, sandals,flip-flops,

Judder bar - speed bump

Jumper - sweater, jersey

CF30

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Wow thats a lot of consecutive posts.

 

The stars on the national flag represent the constellation of Crux as seen from New Zealand.

NZFlag.gif

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Yet another installment of "Kiwispeak"

K - P

Kiwi - New Zealander

Kiwifruit - Brown furry skinned fruit, Zespri, Chinese Gooseberry

Kick the bucket - die

Knackered - exhausted, tired, lethargic

Knuckle sandwhich - a fist in the teeth, punch in the mouth

Laughing gear - mouth, as in wrap your laughing gear around this,

L&P - Fizzy soda water

Lift - elevator

Lolly - candy

Loo - bathroom, toilet

Long drop - outdoor toilet, hole in ground

Lurgy - flu

Mad as a meat axe - very angry or crazy

Main - primary dish of a meal

Maori - indigenous people of New Zealand

Mate - buddy

Motorway - freeway

Naff off - go away, get lost, leave me alone

Nana - grandmother, grandma

Nappy - diaper

North Cape to the Bluff - from one end of New Zealand to the other

OE - Overseas Experience, many students go on their OE after finishing university, see the world

Offsider - an assistant, someones friend, as in "we saw him and his offsider going down the road"

Old bomb - old car

Oldies - parents

On the never never - paying for something using layby, not paying straight away

Open slather - a free-for-all

Pack a sad - bad mood, morose, ill-humoured, broken , as in "she packed a sad"

Pakeha - non-Maori person

Panel beater - auto repair shop, panel shop

Pav - pavlova, dessert usually topped with kiwifruit and cream

Perve - to stare

Petrol - gasoline, gas

Piece-of-piss - easy, not hard to do, as in "didn't take me long to do, it was a piece of piss"

Pikelet - small pancake usually had with jam and whipped cream

Piker - someone who gives up easy, slacker

Pinky - little finger

Piss around - waste time, muck around

Pisshead - someone who drinks a lot of alcohol, heavy drinker

Piss up - party, social gathering, excuse for drinking alcohol

Pissed off - annoyed, angry, upset

Plonk - cheap liquor, cheap wine

Pong - bad smell, stink

Postal code - zip code

Pram - baby stroller, baby pushchair

Pressie - present

Pub - bar or hotel that serves liquor

Pudding - dessert

Pushing up daisies - dead and buried

CF30

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Ya want some more? Ok, here ya go:

Q - S

Quack - Medical doctor

Randy - horny, wanting sex

Rark up - telling somebody off

Rattle your dags - hurry up, get moving

Rellies - relatives, family

Root - have sex, get sex

Ropeable - very angry

Ring - to telephone somebody, as in "I'll give you a ring"

Rubbish - garbage, trash

Rust bucket - decrepit motor car

Scarce as hens teeth - very scarce, rare

Scarfie - university student

Scull - consume, drink quickly

Scroggin - trampers high energy food including dried fruits, chocolate

Serviette - paper napkin

Shandy - drink made with lemonade and beer

Shark and taties - fish and chips

Sheila - slang for woman/female

s*** a brick - exclamation of surprise or annoyance

Shoot through - to leave suddenly

Shout - to treat, to buy something for someone, as in "lunch is my shout"

Sickie - to take a day off work or school because you are sick

Skite - to boast, boasting, bragging

Snarler - sausage

Sook - cry baby, wimp

Sparkie - electrician

Sparrow fart - very early in the morning, sunrise

Sprog - child

Spud - potato

Squiz - take a quick look

Steinie - bottle of Steinlager, brand lager

Strapped for cash - low on cash, no money

Stubby - small glass bottle of beer

Sunday driver - someone who drives very slow

Sunnies - sunglasses

CF30

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One more time! "Kiwispeak"!!!

T - Z well, Y anyway...

Ta - thanks

Take-aways - food to be taken away and eaten, fast food outlet

Tea - evening meal, dinner

Tights - pantyhose

Tiki tour - scenic tour, take the long route

Togs - swimsuit, bathing costume

Torch - flashlight

Tramping - hiking

Twink - white-out

Up the duff - pregnant

Ute - small pickup truck

Veges - vegetables

Wally - clown, silly person

Whinge - complain, moan

Wobbly - to have a tantrum

Wop-wops - situated off the beaten track, out of the way location

Yack - to have a conversation with a friend, to talk

CF30

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A little "Kiwispeak" for y'all:

A - C

Bach - holiday home

Only for North Islanders :blink:

 

On the Mainland (South Island) they're referred to as Crib - holiday home

 

Cheers,

G.

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Well, that's it for me tonight, I've already posted on the # that I'm guessing Team Chelmo

picked. My guess was post #333 for the number of caches that he found, that guess was based

upon his hint that "the number increased by 1" and he found a new cache that day.

If I'm wrong, that's okay - I learned alot about New Zealand and would love to

visit some day.

 

WOOHOO! ! ! Winner number 2! And yes you were right, it was the number of cache finds I have :huh:

 

There will be a Satin Gold Chelmo heading your way real soon, I hope you like it.

 

Now for the BONUS Question for another Chelmo coin...

 

I have a picture hanging in my hallway, originally I gave it to my Grandfateher as it holds a special significance to him. When he passed away my grandmother gave it back to me for safe keeping.

 

Your mission should you choose to accept it. "Post a picture of the same bird" and include it's common name. I will check back after I have had my Roast Lamb for tea and see how you guys are getting on. Good Luck :blink: (The first correct poster will win the coin)

 

Sorry keewee, you are excluded from this one since your Grandfather is mine.

Edited by Team chelmo

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albatross-wandering1.jpg

 

Wandering Albatross

Edited by Bunya

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Now for the BONUS Question for another Chelmo coin...

 

I have a picture hanging in my hallway, originally I gave it to my Grandfateher as it holds a special significance to him. When he passed away my grandmother gave it back to me for safe keeping.

 

Your mission should you choose to accept it. "Post a picture of the same bird" and include it's common name. I will check back after I have had my Roast Lamb for tea and see how you guys are getting on. Good Luck :blink:

Questions: Has this bird been posted in this thread yet and is it a native New Zealand bird?

Am I asking questions you'd rather not answer at this time? :P I gotta get to bed right now anyway. I'm stuffed. :huh:

CF30

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r2315449084-thumb.jpg

 

Miss New Zealand

 

Oops - not that sort of bird . . .

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Now for the BONUS Question for another Chelmo coin...

 

I have a picture hanging in my hallway, originally I gave it to my Grandfateher as it holds a special significance to him. When he passed away my grandmother gave it back to me for safe keeping.

 

Your mission should you choose to accept it. "Post a picture of the same bird" and include it's common name. I will check back after I have had my Roast Lamb for tea and see how you guys are getting on. Good Luck :blink:

Questions: Has this bird been posted in this thread yet and is it a native New Zealand bird?

Am I asking questions you'd rather not answer at this time? :P I gotta get to bed right now anyway. I'm stuffed. :huh:

CF30

 

Perhaps but the bonus coin is from.... now...

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