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Hiding a geocache


Ms Pris
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I have only been doing this for 5 days but now I want to hide one. I want to hide one right outside of work where I can glance up through my office window and watch to see if I see anyone hunting it. B) I talked with my boss and my boss is ok with it if I make the stipulation that though it is accessible 24 hours a day (since it will be outside the gym).... that it can only be searched for during daylight hours. We have an alarm system and a resident coach that gets a little uncomfortable if you search at night. We have been recently burgaled twice (prior to the cameras and securityalarm) and so night time hunts would be viewed as suspicious and you might get a visit from the cops. Actually the added activity in the front might deter the guy who keeps doing smash and grabs in the parking lot. Anyway...... any suggestions on how I can get this point across and tips on hiding my first? Be gentle with me.... I am a geocaching virgin. B).

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Sounds like you have a plan. From what i have read on these forums you should wait a while before placing your first cache. Im not saying wit a long time, just unitl you have a little experience. (20 finds maybe?)

 

I would say put a lot of thought/effort/testing into each and every cache. Too many caches are simply just left in the woods somewhere without much thought (IMHO) . Spend lots of time reading the forums too on hides and containers and info like that. You will learn a lot. (I certainly have. B) )

 

Some people place a cache, just to place a another cache. I would suggest trying to think outside the box.

 

We are new too and we just placed our first cache.

 

You can say in the description that it is a daylight only cache and if this request is not followed that the cache will be archived. All you can do is ask. Unfortunately some just wont listen. (I hope i am wrong.)

 

Hope it works for you.

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When you list your cache, there will be the opportunity to add attributes (the icons on the cache page) I would be sure and click on the ones that indicate that it is NOT a 24/7 cache and that it is NOT a night time cache (The moon and stars icon). Another thing that you might do is mention in your write up that if the finder does do it after daylight hours, you will delete their find, and that if you didn't see them there during the day(since you work there) then you can and will check the security tapes. Just my 2 cents worth.... Good luck with your first hide and happy caching! B)

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Though not all hides can be scenic, ask yourself, what is it about this spot that makes it worthwhile to lead others here. If you can't find a good answer, maybe you should find another place for the cache.

 

As for the scenario you describe, use the icon described above and make in big bold text the fact that the cache should be looked for only during daylight hours. Even then be prepared for a few that will go look for it anytime of the day and ignore your warning.

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On most Traditional caches, we (and many other cachers) don't read the cache description. We just hunt using the coordinates and the size, difficulty and terrain info that we have in our GPSr. If we have trouble finding it, then we'll read the description in our palm.

 

If you have special logging requirements, maybe it should not be a traditional cache.

 

Traditional Caches

 

This is the original cache type consisting of (at a bare minimum) a container and a logbook. The cache may be filled with objects for trade. Normally you'll find a Tupperware-style container, ammo box, or bucket filled with goodies, or smaller container ("microcache") too small to contain items except for a logbook. The coordinates listed on the traditional cache page are the exact location of the cache. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache. Caches that require the geocacher to do something beyond finding the container and signing the logbook generally do not qualify as traditional caches.

I would be upset, if I found you cache and you deleted my find because you didn't like the time that I found it.

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On most Traditional caches, we (and many other cachers) don't read the cache description. We just hunt using the coordinates and the size, difficulty and terrain info that we have in our GPSr. If we have trouble finding it, then we'll read the description in our palm.

 

If you have special logging requirements, maybe it should not be a traditional cache.

 

I would be upset, if I found you cache and you deleted my find because you didn't like the time that I found it.

Well put. These were my exact thoughts as I read this thread. Maybe the cache can be placed away from the building but still within sight of your window?

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I personally would find a different spot. Starbrand asks a good question, what is so interesting about this spot that you want to draw people there?

 

As far as your original question, it may be hard getting your point across, particularly to those of us who cache only with the waypoint on our units and don't look at the cache page. There is also a very small segment of the community who just doesn't care about your (or any) rules and will hunt it at night whether you like it or not. You can always delete their finds but that can create bad blood and won't prevent the resident coach from being disturbed.

Edited by briansnat
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On most Traditional caches, we (and many other cachers) don't read the cache description. We just hunt using the coordinates and the size, difficulty and terrain info that we have in our GPSr. If we have trouble finding it, then we'll read the description in our palm.

 

If you have special logging requirements, maybe it should not be a traditional cache.

 

Traditional Caches

 

This is the original cache type consisting of (at a bare minimum) a container and a logbook. The cache may be filled with objects for trade. Normally you'll find a Tupperware-style container, ammo box, or bucket filled with goodies, or smaller container ("microcache") too small to contain items except for a logbook. The coordinates listed on the traditional cache page are the exact location of the cache. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache. Caches that require the geocacher to do something beyond finding the container and signing the logbook generally do not qualify as traditional caches.

I would be upset, if I found you cache and you deleted my find because you didn't like the time that I found it.

 

You may be upset, but it would be your own fault.

The cache page is there for a reason. If you choose to ignore it you have only yourself to blame.

Don't get me wrong, I have been out with only my GPSr full of waypoints, but if I miss something from the cache page and my log gets deleted I won't blame the cache owner.

 

As for the cache that the OP wants to place- Don't be in too much of a hurry to hide. Take some time to learn what kinds of caches are out there. What types you enjoy finding. Then you can hide those types knowing that they are going to be better than average.

 

When looking for a good place to hide a cache I find Google Earth helps allot. But it depends on if they have high resolution images for your area. And as has been mentioned, think about what it is you are bringing cachers to see or experience. It will make your hides better than most.

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On most Traditional caches, we (and many other cachers) don't read the cache description. We just hunt using the coordinates and the size, difficulty and terrain info that we have in our GPSr. If we have trouble finding it, then we'll read the description in our palm.

 

If you have special logging requirements, maybe it should not be a traditional cache.

 

Traditional Caches

 

This is the original cache type consisting of (at a bare minimum) a container and a logbook. The cache may be filled with objects for trade. Normally you'll find a Tupperware-style container, ammo box, or bucket filled with goodies, or smaller container ("microcache") too small to contain items except for a logbook. The coordinates listed on the traditional cache page are the exact location of the cache. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache. Caches that require the geocacher to do something beyond finding the container and signing the logbook generally do not qualify as traditional caches.

I would be upset, if I found you cache and you deleted my find because you didn't like the time that I found it.

 

You may be upset, but it would be your own fault.

The cache page is there for a reason. If you choose to ignore it you have only yourself to blame.

Don't get me wrong, I have been out with only my GPSr full of waypoints, but if I miss something from the cache page and my log gets deleted I won't blame the cache owner.

 

As for the cache that the OP wants to place- Don't be in too much of a hurry to hide. Take some time to learn what kinds of caches are out there. What types you enjoy finding. Then you can hide those types knowing that they are going to be better than average.

 

When looking for a good place to hide a cache I find Google Earth helps allot. But it depends on if they have high resolution images for your area. And as has been mentioned, think about what it is you are bringing cachers to see or experience. It will make your hides better than most.

 

I'll agree with gof1. I've never tried paperless, but there seems ot be a growing insistance on entitlement to paperless caching. That's why there are cache pages!

This proposed cache does not sound like one of the more interesting proposals. Reminds me of the one on the stop sign in front of someone's residence. But, then again, I've got one visible .6 mile out my back window. (The area is visible...) I've never spotted ayone searching for it yet. Oh, well. Then again, it's a very scenic spot that only the locals knew about.

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