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i would like to get into ham but before i do i want to see prices on radios i dont want anthing expensive but i do want to get somthing i can take with me on trips or in the car.

 

i got sick of just listening to hams on my scanner without being able to talk back

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i would like to get into ham but before i do i want to see prices on radios i dont want anthing expensive but i do want to get somthing i can take with me on trips or in the car.

 

i got sick of just listening to hams on my scanner without being able to talk back

 

Go to www.arrl.org and www.hello-radio.org.

 

You can get a Handy Talkie for as little as about $120 or as much as about $350. Mobiles go for $150 to $1000+. It just depends on what you want to do and spend.

 

www.universal-radio.com has a good site to look at equipment but you can probably find better prices.

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The cheapest sites I have come across are:

 

www.gigaparts.com

www.randl.com

 

I would also recommend purchasing the Technician manual from www.ARRL.org. This gives you all of the information you will need to pass your test. It even includes the exact question pool with all of the answers. Let us know if you need any help!!!

 

73's

KE5EHZ

TacRat

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how hard is this test?and i have looked and so far for handhelds im looking at the 2m ic-v82 or the 70cm ic-u82 which is better

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I dont know too much about icoms. I'm into Yaesu. I have a FT-60r and it is a great radio!!! Long lasting battery, great transmit, all kinds of good features. If you want to review a piece of equipment, go to www.eham.net and search for that particular item. There are lots of hams out there that give their opinion which really helps you out before you spend hundreds of dollars on something.

 

As far as the test, it depends how well you understand the material. A lot of it is common sense, but then there is the electronics portion, understanding voltage, current, resistance, so forth, antenna propagation. I really recommend getting the manual from ARRL.org. My fiance just passed her test and she had no knowledge of radio prior to the test. She only missed 2 out of 35. The book (from ARRL) also has the question pool with the answers. So really, if you study that and memorize the questions and answers, you should be talking in no time.

 

Good luck!!!

 

73's

KE5EHZ

TacRat

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how hard is this test?and i have looked and so far for handhelds im looking at the 2m ic-v82 or the 70cm ic-u82 which is better

 

It's a piece of cake. I tested with a bunch of 12yr old scouts. They all passed.

 

You can practice the test online.

 

I have a Yaesu too. Get a dual band radio, that way you can be sure to hit a repeater where ever you go. Well, as long as there is a repeater where you go.

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how hard is this test?and i have looked and so far for handhelds im looking at the 2m ic-v82 or the 70cm ic-u82 which is better

As TacRat said, it isn't really a big deal to just memorize the questions and answers. Though there are many questions, they all revolve around a smaller number of issues and are variations on the same questions.

 

Here's one way to do it and depend on your short term memory. Get the question pool from ARRL and edit it so that only the correct answer appears for any one question. If you can find a test session in the afternoon, you can start the day out by reading this question pool over about 5 times or so, start to finish, and immediately take your exam. One of the local guys schedules those study sessions and I have served as one of the volunteer examiners for him many times. It's all legal, but not necessarily what was originally invisioned for the testing -- memorizing the questions and answers.

 

If you use this method to pass the examine, however, it is very important that you CONTINUE to learn about amateur radio, not just answers to test questions. You can hook up with other more experienced hams in your area (maybe a club or just new friends you meet on the air) and continue your education. You also learn a lot by doing. You'll also find that certain areas of amateur radio will pique your interest, perhaps more than just hanging out on the local 2m repeater and talking with the same old people. (Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with talking with the same old people on the local repeater, but there's certainly more to ham radio than just that!)

 

Anyway, you can google ham radio and the various operating modes to learn about what kind of fun there is to be had out there. FM and repeaters, VHF/UHF Single Sideband weak signal work, HF, AM, slow scan television, ATV (fast scan "regular" TV), and even (gulp) CW morse code! There is way more stuff but you can find that out online or in a book.

 

Good luck. I got into ham radio a little over 22 years ago when I got bored with CB. Many of us are old CB converts who wanted something more from radio than CB had to offer.

 

Ken KE6N (ex-N6MHG, which is what I'm stuck with for my geocaching "handle".)

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Thanks for the information. Do you know of any testers for Ham Radio, in the Matanuska Susitna Borough District (Wasilla, or Palmer), in Alaska?

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Thanks for the information. Do you know of any testers for Ham Radio, in the Matanuska Susitna Borough District (Wasilla, or Palmer), in Alaska?

 

Go to the following link and look for exams. http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec/examsearch.phtml

You can also go to this link, http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml, and search for nearby clubs. They would definitely be able to help you out. Hope this helps!!!

 

73's

KE5EHZ

TacRat

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Well i got the ARRL Genral Class License handbook from my library and am about a 1/4 of the way some of those Q's look pretty hard. for these handheld are they actually good or are they very limited. also i read in the book im supposed to learn morse code. is this still true i thought they said i didnt.

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so im new do i still need to know morse if i dont know it at all? Plus what is the most popular band?

Edited by FlagFinder

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so im new do i still need to know morse if i dont know it at all? Plus what is the most popular band?

 

No you do not need morse code.

 

What is the most popular band depends on a lot of factors.

 

I'd say, far and away, 20m is the most popular HF band because the antennas are relatively small, and the propagation is generally good most of the year.

 

However, it's not so great if you want to chat in your car on the way to work, and HF sets are expensive.

 

Everywhere I have been in Canada and the US, if there was ham activity, there was 2m activity. 2m rigs (both handheld and mobile) seem to be the least expensive.

 

70cm would be the next best, but not everywhere has an active 70cm community.

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so im new do i still need to know morse if i dont know it at all? Plus what is the most popular band?

 

No you do not need morse code.

 

What is the most popular band depends on a lot of factors.

 

I'd say, far and away, 20m is the most popular HF band because the antennas are relatively small, and the propagation is generally good most of the year.

 

However, it's not so great if you want to chat in your car on the way to work, and HF sets are expensive.

 

Everywhere I have been in Canada and the US, if there was ham activity, there was 2m activity. 2m rigs (both handheld and mobile) seem to be the least expensive.

 

70cm would be the next best, but not everywhere has an active 70cm community.

 

(edit) bleah, double post. Oh well. Turn your head sideways and relax your eyes and maybe it will make a 3D thingy.

Edited by geoSquid

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most hams in my area hang out around 147 mhz can i get that with a 2 meter handheld considering im within 2 miles of a repeater

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70cm would be the next best, but not everywhere has an OPEN active 70cm community.

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most hams in my area hang out around 147 mhz can i get that with a 2 meter handheld considering im within 2 miles of a repeater

There ya go. 2m band = 144 - 148 MHz. And if I'm reading you correctly, go ahead and use the repeater, too, if you want. There are most likely other repeaters you might be able to hit, too.

 

Oh, and if you have any difficulties, add an external antenna to your setup. (But if adding an external antenna to most handhelds these days, be prepared to receive a bit of intermod interference from paging transmitters and the like... They're wide-banded and don't offer the best adjacent channel and out of band rejection on strong transmitters. But then, neither do some mobiles units...)

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well i only have decided to get a portable because they are more affordable. considering im selling my 210 bundle and using that money to get the radio

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most hams in my area hang out around 147 mhz can i get that with a 2 meter handheld considering im within 2 miles of a repeater

depends what frequency the repeaters on. Not sure about US but in the uk the repeater is the centre of activity.

 

Hmm, looking at a US bandplan, that is where repeaters operate, so (particularly if its the lower part of the 147 area) is most likely what they are using.

 

Heh, you're lucky, we only get 144-146 here in the uk :-(

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Heh, you're lucky, we only get 144-146 here in the uk :-(

But then you have 68 - 70.5 MHz and we don't.

 

And don't go bringing up about our 420 - 450 MHz band we have to share. We're getting flack about it on the east and west coasts because of alleged interference with missile detecting radar... Right near me in California, there is talk of forcing about 100+ repeater owners in the 70 cm band to dial output down to 5 Watts or even maybe losing the ability to operate in the band. Oh great.

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i would like to get into ham but before i do i want to see prices on radios i dont want anthing expensive but i do want to get somthing i can take with me on trips or in the car.

 

i got sick of just listening to hams on my scanner without being able to talk back

 

That is exactly how and why I got into ham radio. :o And for around the same price as one of the better quality CB radios and antenna, you can have a 50 watt 2 meter fm radio and antenna to install in your car. About half again to twice as much for a dual band 70cm/2m radio and dual band antenna, but you are getting two radios in one for the money.

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most hams in my area hang out around 147 mhz can i get that with a 2 meter handheld considering im within 2 miles of a repeater

 

I regularly talk through a repeater 28 miles away with a 5 watt handheld 2m radio. You just have to be in a good location on a hill top and nothing between you and the repeater tower. But down in town amongst buildings and power lines, my 50 watt mobile has a tough time getting through that repeater. The nature of the beast.

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most hams in my area hang out around 147 mhz can i get that with a 2 meter handheld considering im within 2 miles of a repeater

 

I regularly talk through a repeater 28 miles away with a 5 watt handheld 2m radio. You just have to be in a good location on a hill top and nothing between you and the repeater tower. But down in town amongst buildings and power lines, my 50 watt mobile has a tough time getting through that repeater. The nature of the beast.

 

With 0.5 W on my handheld, while standing atop Foymount (elev, I carried on a QSO with a guy about 80 km away. He was using four stacked 13-element yagis :o

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Well i got the ARRL Genral Class License handbook from my library and am about a 1/4 of the way some of those Q's look pretty hard. for these handheld are they actually good or are they very limited. also i read in the book im supposed to learn morse code. is this still true i thought they said i didnt.

I went through the 3rd chapter and then took the test for tech and passed. It is mostly common sense stuff and you'll be amazed at how much you really know already at that level. I'm still readinjg the material, but now that I have my tech license, I'm a bit more relaxed about it.

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here 70cm is shared with the MoD as well... not that you hear many complaints from them, just makes the 70cm repeater licencing more difficult to get

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Well i got the ARRL Genral Class License handbook from my library and am about a 1/4 of the way some of those Q's look pretty hard. for these handheld are they actually good or are they very limited. also i read in the book im supposed to learn morse code. is this still true i thought they said i didnt.

I went through the 3rd chapter and then took the test for tech and passed. It is mostly common sense stuff and you'll be amazed at how much you really know already at that level. I'm still readinjg the material, but now that I have my tech license, I'm a bit more relaxed about it.

right now im about to enter chapter 5 but with a tech can i use the 70cm as well qs the 2m or do i need a general license. so far as ive been going through the question pool i have most trouble remembering the frequencies. and slow scan tv is that what i here around 50mhz on the scanner. keep picking up cbs :blink: and pbs :)

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With 0.5 W on my handheld, while standing atop Foymount (elev, I carried on a QSO with a guy about 80 km away. He was using four stacked 13-element yagis :)

 

Well we know which station was doing all the work, but it just goes to show that almost anything is possible if conditions and circumstances fall into place, and somebody tries something different. I was a Tech for 7 years and learned a lot and tried just about everything a Tech can do. Now I am a General and I have new privileges and things to try. My best HF DX so far was a 20m QSO to Japan with a 100 watt barefoot radio and a long wire strung through the pine trees. There is something to be said for taking your time and enjoying each class and not going from muggle to Extra class in one test session. Smell the roses (or the melting solder) along the way, the journey is the thing that matters, not the destination. 73 :blink:

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Sorry computer timed out and I duplicate posted.

Edited by kd5kuf

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70cm would be the next best, but not everywhere has an OPEN active 70cm community.

 

If the 70cm community is skulking in the shadows behind some kind of secret handshake, it's the same thing as not existing, IMO.

 

If it's not "open" then it doesn't exist for all practical purposes.

Edited by geoSquid

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With 0.5 W on my handheld, while standing atop Foymount (elev, I carried on a QSO with a guy about 80 km away. He was using four stacked 13-element yagis :)

 

Well we know which station was doing all the work,

 

hehe... very true. I did, however, have to go to the top of the mountain but that wasn't a real challenge because there's a road.

 

but it just goes to show that almost anything is possible if conditions and circumstances fall into place, and somebody tries something different.

 

Which was more the point. I hadn't intended to QSO with anyone in particular. I was mostly poking about on the multitude of repeaters I could hit from up there since there's line of sight all over eastern Ontario from that spot.

 

It was neat to turn the power way down though, and still do it, even if the far end was the guy with the big ear :)

 

I was a Tech for 7 years and learned a lot and tried just about everything a Tech can do. Now I am a General and I have new privileges and things to try. My best HF DX so far was a 20m QSO to Japan with a 100 watt barefoot radio and a long wire strung through the pine trees. There is something to be said for taking your time and enjoying each class and not going from muggle to Extra class in one test session. Smell the roses (or the melting solder) along the way, the journey is the thing that matters, not the destination. 73 :)

 

I do mostly PSK and related modes on HF. I'm hard-of-hearing enough that voice based radio on HF is too much work :( that's another cool thing about amateur radio - there's always SOMETHING you can do to participate in the hobby, irrespective of disabilities. That makes the hobby very open in ways that other hobbies are not.

 

Despite the current solar status, I did manage to work Madagascar and Diego Garcia in the past year on 50W of RTTY. For me, having just got back into ham radio a year ago after a decade away, that was a real treat for me so I value this card highly:

 

VQ9LA.jpg

Edited by geoSquid

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can i use a 2m and 70cm with a tech license because i think ive reached a decision for the yaesu vx-2r lookig around ebay for a little less $$$ though by the way is this unit realy a 2m and 70cm it says on some sites but others no?

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70cm would be the next best, but not everywhere has an OPEN active 70cm community.

 

If the 70cm community is skulking in the shadows behind some kind of secret handshake, it's the same thing as not existing, IMO.

 

If it's not "open" then it doesn't exist for all practical purposes.

Agreed. And that's the way it mostly was for quite a while back in the 80s. Now, at least where I am, there are many open 70cm repeaters.

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right now im about to enter chapter 5 but with a tech can i use the 70cm as well qs the 2m or do i need a general license. so far as ive been going through the question pool i have most trouble remembering the frequencies. and slow scan tv is that what i here around 50mhz on the scanner. keep picking up cbs :) and pbs :(

In the US, techs have "full amateur privileges" on amateur bands above 30 MHz. Upwards of 1500 W. PEP (think moonbounce), any legal mode, etc.

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Agreed. And that's the way it mostly was for quite a while back in the 80s. Now, at least where I am, there are many open 70cm repeaters.

 

Where I live, there was a wave of... how shall I put it... ineffective operators from the CB world when Canada dropped code requirements back in the early 90's. They filled up 2m (lots of HTX202 users), and there was a lot of idiocy.

 

That was good, however, for 70cm here in Ottawa. There were a lot of 70cm repeaters and lots of activity, and the nicer, brighter folks who migrated from CB as well as anyone else who wanted to chat without swearing, dead carriers, music, etc. could do so as (my guess) the extra cost of a 70cm radio kept a lot of the weirdos out.

 

Time has marched on, however, and the crush of disgruntled CBers is gone. The sharp ones stayed as hams. 2m is useful again and many (most?) of our 70cm repeaters have shut down.

 

Personally, I use 70cm for simplex a lot with my usual chat targets. A nice quiet 70 cm simplex frequency and a PL tone makes for nice communication around town. Generally, I see about 6 km on 5W in the urban area, but with the 35 W of my D700 into my Comet SBB7 and my friends and I are good anywhere in town. In effect, 70 cm has become the real replacement for CB for me :blink:

Edited by geoSquid

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Well i got the ARRL Genral Class License handbook from my library and am about a 1/4 of the way some of those Q's look pretty hard. for these handheld are they actually good or are they very limited. also i read in the book im supposed to learn morse code. is this still true i thought they said i didnt.

I went through the 3rd chapter and then took the test for tech and passed. It is mostly common sense stuff and you'll be amazed at how much you really know already at that level. I'm still readinjg the material, but now that I have my tech license, I'm a bit more relaxed about it.

right now im about to enter chapter 5 but with a tech can i use the 70cm as well qs the 2m or do i need a general license. so far as ive been going through the question pool i have most trouble remembering the frequencies. and slow scan tv is that what i here around 50mhz on the scanner. keep picking up cbs :blink: and pbs :lol:

Just a quick question; is that the most current version of the book? The test (and the test questions) changed recently if I recall correctly, and libraries are notorious for hanging onto outdated publications.

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it was the book recommended to me im on chapter six its kindof boring compared to the book im also reading "october sky" but its still cool by the way has anyome here taken both general and technician tests i want to know how much easier the technician is because i can get by with it for the radio i will be using.

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Just a quick question; is that the most current version of the book? The test (and the test questions) changed recently if I recall correctly, and libraries are notorious for hanging onto outdated publications.

The question pool for the technician exam changed in February 2006. I recommend the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual for the technician exam. The latest version includes the latest question pool and will prepare you for your exam, even if you're brand new to amature radio. You can order it here: http://www.arrl.org/catalog/index.php3?cat...ware+and+more...

 

With a technician license, you can operate on frequences 50MHz and up, which is what most people operate on. And in February 2007 they changed the requirement for morse code for the technician class, so it is really quite easy. You can take practice tests here: http://www.qrz.com/p/testing.pl.

 

By the way, when you take your technician exam, if you pass they will let you take the Genera or Extra exam at the same time for no additional cost.

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With a technician license, you can operate on frequences 50MHz and up, which is what most people operate on.

 

Now Technicians can also operate on 10m on 28.300-28.500 USB and 28.100-28.300 CW and the Novice/Tech Plus CW portions on the lower bands. The CW test is no more, Upgrading is written testing only now. The General Class test pool changes next month. Will be harder.

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well i have been working on the practice tests and im passing. so i have 2 more weeks till the real test. When was the last time the REAL test was updated?

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well i have been working on the practice tests and im passing. so i have 2 more weeks till the real test. When was the last time the REAL test was updated?

The question pool gets updated every so many years. The question pool for the Technician class was updated last year, so the practice tests on qrz.com and eham.net are current. The question pool for the General class license is being updated starting July 1, 2007 (next week). I'm not sure on the Extra class license.

 

If you're passing the tests on qrz.com, then you should be good to go. Those are the actual questions. Of course make sure you also understand the content and don't just memorize the answers (by the way, the multiple choice answers are not an exact match on the actual test, e.g. answer A might be D, etc. but the text is stil the same). Some of the stuff seems pretty silly to have to know (and some of it is), but other stuff is pretty valuable, especially when you get into th HF stuff.

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I wont be getting into HF sadly, or at least not yet :signalviolin: but i have been using the eham question pool and studying the answers. not the letters though. I also have been reading the arrl genral class book thing but i guess i can stop looking at the answers in that book seeing they wont be curent for the next test session.

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Good Luck on the Tech exam. Just passed my General at Field Day and fixing to start studying for Extra. I had tried to pass the Morse in 2000 and my two girls came along and it got put to the side. I will pick it up later.Now I am looking at HF rigs. If you hang out at Field Day or an event station when they are making contacts, you will be ready to upgrade pretty quick. It gets addictive.

 

73's

KD5IFA

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well today my tiny little radio came in the mail. Wow at least half the size i imagined. its a vx-2r and the previous owner kept it in tip top shape. by the way is it legal if i use the radio as a reciever until i get my license or does this break fcc rules.

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well today my tiny little radio came in the mail. Wow at least half the size i imagined. its a vx-2r and the previous owner kept it in tip top shape. by the way is it legal if i use the radio as a reciever until i get my license or does this break fcc rules.

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well today my tiny little radio came in the mail. Wow at least half the size i imagined. its a vx-2r and the previous owner kept it in tip top shape. by the way is it legal if i use the radio as a reciever until i get my license or does this break fcc rules.

Perfectly legal to use it as a reciever. Just don't get tempted to try it until you get your license. Let us know when you get on the air.

 

73's

kd5ifa

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