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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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If you were to observe the face of a normal digital clock between the hours of midnight and the following noon (inclusive), how many times would the hour hand be exactly beneath of the minute hand?

Never, a digital clock doesn't have hands.

 

I thought it might have caught somebody out but you're obviosuly all too smart :laughing:

 

DING

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Never, a digital clock doesn't have hands.

If you double click on the time in the bottom right of the your screen a digital clock appears with hands!!! :laughing:

If I double click on the time in the bottom right of my screen, I get a message saying "You do not have the proper privilege level to change the System Time." But then, it's not my screen, it's my employer's screen.

Edited by NickPick
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Never, a digital clock doesn't have hands.

If you double click on the time in the bottom right of the your screen a digital clock appears with hands!!! :)

If I double click on the time in the bottom right of my screen, I get a message saying "You do not have the proper privilege level to change the System Time." But then, it's not my screen, it's my employer's screen.

 

If I double click on the time at the bottom of my screen I don't get any such sillyness 'cos I'm running Linux :)

 

Anyway where's 'The Bongtwashes' - it's their turn.

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Rutson and Don K deserve a semi-ding each.

 

The innovator of what we now call GPS was Roger Easton, who, like John Harrison a couple of centuries earlier, had the insight to realise that the fundamental secret to real-time 3-D navigation is time.

 

Also like Harrison, he was a better engineer than he was a marketing wonk, so his vowel concatenation of TIMenavigATION into Timation was somewhat clumsy. Like Harrison, however, he knew that to implement his idea he would have to go to the deepest pockets to find funding. In 1964 the USAF had a much greater budget for that sort of thing than the USN, so that's where he went for the R&D budget. To this day the USAF is the 'owner' agency of NavStar/GPS.

 

Timation was devised quite independently of the Doppler-based Transit system and was also separate from the USN follow-through of Transit which lacked the third dimension. The Navy really didn't care about or need 3-D fixes as even their submarines knew their height above or below sea level. Their putative version of Easton's Timation was cruddy and inherently limited, not merely by its budget.

 

Easton's Timation really was the mathematical model and prototype of what we, perhaps wrongly, call GPS.

 

Rutson's answer was first, but slightly off the bull's-eye, so he deserves a hemi-demi-semi-ding.

Don K's answer was timatiously second, but was spatially slightly closer to the cache, so his is a demi-hemi-semi-ding.

 

In the spirit of Christmas Present, not past, I leave it to either to be the first to claim to the full ding and to set the next Q.

 

Cheers, and Happy Crimbo to all,

 

The Forester

Edited by The Forester
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Anything to do with energy loss in homes? ;)

 

Someone is getting warm at last!

Is it insulation regulations?

 

A DING for Nediam

 

Public Service Announcement

 

0.35 is the figure in W/m2K that is the minimum standard of thermal insulation for a wall in a new building.

If you are adding an extension it is 0.30W/m2K

 

This figure is basically a rule of thumb. Building Regulation Approval requires Minimum Energy Performance calculations, (known as a Thermal Model) measured in the form of target CO2 emission rates along with pressure testing of the building (for air leakage). These figures form only a small part of the calculations now required. This will keep Environmental Services Engineers in employment for eons.

 

Floor and roofs are generally 0.25W/m2K with windows at 2.2W/m2K

 

The other figures quoted in the question are for uninsulated cavity wall construction (1.55) and solid brickwall construction (2.09, i.e. a Victorian terrace house)

I am currently specifying Argon filled double glazed units that are 1.1W/m2K which compared to the two previous, you really could have had a glass house and used less fuel.

 

The problem with all this insulation, and especially for large buildings, although it does apply to houses, is in keeping them cool!

 

The heat transfer coefficient (U- value) is the amount of heat in watts per unit of time, which is transferred through 1 sq.m of wall surface per degree Kelvin difference between internal and external temperature.

 

(("The problem with all this insulation, and especially for large buildings, although it does apply to houses, is in keeping them cool! ))

 

Reading through noticed this ....... Pilkington "k" glass will actually help keep rooms cool in summer . apparently an unexpected side effect of the coating to help retain heat for double glazed windows

 

:rolleyes:

 

I know , I know .......I`m miles behind here

Edited by Archangel_UK
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Dambuster March?

Ding to Ian

Sounds more than a little far fetched to me. Can you say where you got the information from. A Google search shows nothing.

 

a.

I did try googling etc. to confirm it, but I remember watching the opening ceremony and almost choking when I realised what I was seeing and hearing. Unfortunately that particular olympics is better rememberd for other reasons.

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I did try googling etc. to confirm it, but I remember watching the opening ceremony and almost choking when I realised what I was seeing and hearing

 

Whatever you heard couldn't possibly have been Eric Coates' theme music from that film. The dates just don't match.

 

The Berlin Olympics were in 1938. Right?

The bombing raid was in 1943. Right?

The film was made in 1954/55. Right?

 

Unless the third Reich had developed time travel as a secret weapon, it is quite impossible for the film score to have been played in 1938.

 

Methinks the reason for the erroneous answer lies in the fact that the score borrows a few bars from the Royal Air Force March Past.

 

It was the Royal Air Force March that you heard, not the Dambusters themetune.

 

As any other officer who wore her majesty's flying club's uniform and had to march to it on Cranwell's parade ground will also confirm, the RAF's own tune is what the Germans played in 1938.

 

Here's what it sounds like:

http://www.torontoaircrew.com/Pilot_Class/MarchPast.mp3

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I think the maggot drowner is onto something.

 

I remember a few years ago when Seti_at_home was being touted, I looked into how the Arecibo radiotelescope steers its gondola. I remember Jansky units being mentioned in the text of the technowibble, and I got the impression that they're the deepspace radio astronomy equivalent of the Bel unit which we use in hydrospace acoustics. Nothing to do with satellites, unless you count us as a satellite, but I think the flybaby aquarist is pretty close.

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I think the maggot drowner is onto something.

 

I remember a few years ago when Seti_at_home was being touted, I looked into how the Arecibo radiotelescope steers its gondola. I remember Jansky units being mentioned in the text of the technowibble, and I got the impression that they're the deepspace radio astronomy equivalent of the Bel unit which we use in hydrospace acoustics. Nothing to do with satellites, unless you count us as a satellite, but I think the flybaby aquarist is pretty close.

 

Jansky is a unit of luminous flux used by radio astronomers in measuring electromagnetic radiation from space.

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Jansky is a unit of luminous flux used by radio astronomers in measuring electromagnetic radiation from space.

 

Or "Jansky is a unit of luminous flux used by radio astronomers in measuring electromagnetic radiation from space. Symbol, Jy (no period). Jansky is also the plural; apparently no one writes "janskies." One jansky is 10−26 watt per square meter per hertz." to use the full cut-and-paste quote from t'internet (thank you Google)

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