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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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And the answers ....

The first decimal coins were introduced starting 23rd April 1968

Decimalisation was 15th February 1971

The shilling remained until 31st December 1990 leaving the florin as the last remaining old coin.

The new size smaller decimal coins were introduced in 1992

The florin ceased to be legal tender on 30th June 1993

So the DING (or should that be jangle of coins) goes to MartyBartfast with good logic and only a few years out.

 

 

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Thanks.

A three part question, first one to give me all three correct gets the DING, so please name:

  1. The highest mountain in the world, i.e. the one with the peak highest above sea level.
  2. The highest mountain in the world, i.e. the one with it's peak highest above the Earth's centre.
  3. The tallest mountain in the world, i.e. the one which has the greatest vertical distance from its base to its peak.

 

 

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Let’s see if our confidence is misplaced ?

 

1) Mount Everest

 

2) We think it’s in Ecuador, and the distance from the earths centre is due to the earth not being a perfect sphere and bulging slightly at the equator, but we have no idea of the name.

 

3) Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

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1 hour ago, me N u said:

Let’s see if our confidence is misplaced ?

 

1) Mount Everest

 

2) We think it’s in Ecuador, and the distance from the earths centre is due to the earth not being a perfect sphere and bulging slightly at the equator, but we have no idea of the name.

 

3) Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

 

Correct in all respects, 2 is  Chimborazo

 

Over to you

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This one is close to home as my father fought the Japanese in New Guinea. It was 15 August after the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It may have been still 14th in UK I'm guessing due to time zone differences. The actual surrender document was signed in early September (the month of my father's birthday) on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo.

My mother's birthday was on Armistice Day 1921,  November 11.

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10 hours ago, MartyBartfast said:

Is that one of those mud skipper things, that looks like a cross between a fish and a newt and uses it's "fins" to drag itself across the mud?

 

Nope. I believe that's an amphibian, like a mud skipper or axolotl. Think reptilian.

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5 hours ago, colleda said:

No takers for the Land Mullet?

Answer: It is the largest of the skink family of reptiles growing up to 50cm long.

 

I have another question in its place.

 

What type of creature(?) is a cockentrice?

It is a government briefing - a load of C**k , written in a trice!!

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6 hours ago, colleda said:

No takers for the Land Mullet?

Answer: It is the largest of the skink family of reptiles growing up to 50cm long.

 

I have another question in its place.

 

What type of creature(?) is a cockentrice?

It's one of those dishes which consists of one animal stuffed inside another animal(s), and then roasted, sort of like a Russian doll roast; I don't know whether it has specific animals, if so I don't know which.

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1 hour ago, MartyBartfast said:

It's one of those dishes which consists of one animal stuffed inside another animal(s), and then roasted, sort of like a Russian doll roast; I don't know whether it has specific animals, if so I don't know which.

You're close.

It's the front half of one animal joined to the rear half of another, stuffed and roasted. Popular in Tudor times.

But what two animals were they?

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16 hours ago, me N u said:

We think the front was a pig/piglet but not a clue on the rear end - have seen it mentioned on one of the food history programmes.

That's close enough. Front half was a suckling pig to which a turkey was sewn in at the back. Perhaps the origin of pigs that fly?:lol:

That's close enough for a ding to me N u to keep this moving.

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7 hours ago, colleda said:

One, perhaps?

 

Ding to colleda.

 

 

In the introduction to the book, Stephen Hawking informs that he was told “he would lose half the readers for every equation he included” but thought that Einstein's e =mc2 was well known enough to include.

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On 6/9/2020 at 4:55 PM, me N u said:

 

Ding to colleda.

 

 

In the introduction to the book, Stephen Hawking informs that he was told “he would lose half the readers for every equation he included” but thought that Einstein's e =mc2 was well known enough to include.

Thanks me N u

 

What historical event was originally known as "the incident on Griffin's wharf".

Edited by colleda
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