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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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2 hours ago, Boggin's Dad said:

As a stab in the dark, Were they both designed by the same architect?

 

if it is not that I do not have a clue

DING to Boggin's Dad.   This came up on Great British Rail Journeys a week or so ago, with that Portillo bloke. Love seeing all those places he gets to.

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A ding for Optimist on the run.

 

Mines Rescue is correctly Cave & Mines Rescue.

 

It is surprising how many people don't know the six services - but as said it depends where you live.  No point calling Coastguard in Wolverhampton, or Mountain Rescue on the Norfolk coast!

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We arrived at the locks towards the end of my first week on a narrowboat.. Our steersman expected us to take hours and meet lots of boats coming down. We were lucky and didn't have to wait at any lock.  I prepared and opened, our steersman had the narrowboat and my colleague closed. We were supposed to have a break half way up but we were doing so well that we just carried on. The incentive was a hot shower and dinner at the top!   Definite feeling of achievement on completion plus an enjoyable week trying something new.

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10 hours ago, searcherdog said:

We arrived at the locks towards the end of my first week on a narrowboat.. Our steersman expected us to take hours and meet lots of boats coming down. We were lucky and didn't have to wait at any lock.  I prepared and opened, our steersman had the narrowboat and my colleague closed. We were supposed to have a break half way up but we were doing so well that we just carried on. The incentive was a hot shower and dinner at the top!   Definite feeling of achievement on completion plus an enjoyable week trying something new.

It's quite surprising, and satisfying, how quickly you can get through a flight when there is no congestion and you get a rythm working.

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Thanks Optimist on the run. 30 locks raising the canal 67 metres in just over 2 miles.

Next question.....

Which food

- is not grown in the UK

- was first sold as a luxury item in 1901

- was classified as an essential food during wartime rationing

- is apparently now eaten by most people at least once a week

- has been loosely connected to geocaching since 2010?

 

 

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21 hours ago, searcherdog said:

Thanks Optimist on the run. 30 locks raising the canal 67 metres in just over 2 miles.

Next question.....

Which food

- is not grown in the UK

- was first sold as a luxury item in 1901

- was classified as an essential food during wartime rationing

- is apparently now eaten by most people at least once a week

- has been loosely connected to geocaching since 2010?

 

 

Rice? I'm not aware of geocaching connections though.

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On 18/08/2018 at 6:37 PM, searcherdog said:

Thanks Optimist on the run. 30 locks raising the canal 67 metres in just over 2 miles.

Next question.....

Which food

- is not grown in the UK

- was first sold as a luxury item in 1901

- was classified as an essential food during wartime rationing

- is apparently now eaten by most people at least once a week

- has been loosely connected to geocaching since 2010?

 

 

Not frogs or pigeons then.

Hamsters maybe?

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According to my late lamented Grandma an antimacassar was a piece of cloth draped over the back of a sofa or upholstered chair, in the 'front room' (the posh one only used for visitors.and high holidays). Sort of tea towel sized, I believe it was something to do with keeping gentleman's hair oil off the best furniture, at at Grandma's house the antimacassars were embroidered, sort of decorative, and had long outlasted the hair oil  fashion which I'd guess was probably popular in her youth, she was born around 1900

 

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10 hours ago, hal-an-tow said:

According to my late lamented Grandma an antimacassar was a piece of cloth draped over the back of a sofa or upholstered chair, in the 'front room' (the posh one only used for visitors.and high holidays). Sort of tea towel sized, I believe it was something to do with keeping gentleman's hair oil off the best furniture, at at Grandma's house the antimacassars were embroidered, sort of decorative, and had long outlasted the hair oil  fashion which I'd guess was probably popular in her youth, she was born around 1900

 

That's a ding for you. As you said, to protect upholstery of chairs and sofas from hair oil which was known a Macassar Oil. Very Victorian.

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Thanks for the ding,

now an easy question , and one that was asked in an actual pub qui a couple of years ago, but the team around me didn't believe I knew the answer so preferred a guess, and gave a wrong answer instead. They were people with encyclopedic knowledge of TV soap operas, spectator sport and pop music, friends of a neighbour of mine. Yes, It still rankles  ...

What is the most common origin of the bristles of a camel hair brush ?

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