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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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OK, sometimes you have a boring wait to occupy, and I've reached an impasse withh the puzzle cache I'm banging my head against, so I went through and revised my calculations for this, having realised I'd only added in the milking stools the once. So, as my grammar school training always insisted in exams you must 'show your working'  here goes : best read from the bottom to top
day 12 = 182+24 = 206   (day 11 plus twelve lords a leaping)
day 11 = 160+22 = 182   (day 10 plus eleven ladies)
day 10 = 140+20 = 160   (day 9 plus 20 for ten pipers)
day  9 = 122+18 = 140   (day 8 plus 18 for  nine drummers)
day  8 = 50+72   = 122   (day 7 plus 8 maid/cow/milking stool combos, 9 legs per)= 72)
day  7 = 36+14    =  50   (day 6 plus 14 for seven swans)
day  6 = 24+12    =  36   (day 5 plus 12 for Six geese)

day  5 =                  24    gold rings,same legs as day 4
day  4 =   16+8  =   24    (day 3 plus 8 for four colly birds)
day  3 =   10+6  =  16    (day 2 plus 6 for three fench hens)
day  2 =   6+4   =   10    (day 1 plus 4 for two turtle doves)
Day  1 = 2+2+2   =  6    (me,my true love + one partridge)

                   Total = 976

So, my new answer is 976.

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 Or. if inanimate legs are disallowed ( and assuming none of the lords a leaping are drunk as lords, i.e. legless )

day 12 = 158+24=  182 (day 11 plus twelve lords a leaping)
day 11 = 136+22 = 158 (day 10 plus eleven ladies)
day 10 = 116+20 = 136   (day 9 plus 20 for ten pipers)
day  9 =  98+18 = 116 (day 8 plus 18 for  nine drummers)
day  8 = 50+48  =  98   (day 7 plus 8 maid/cow combos,6 legs per)=48)
      Giving a  total without milking stools = 856

I think I need a lie down now.

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Hal-an-tow, the problem with your method is that it adds me and my true love on every day of Christmas. Although they (we?) are mentioned 12 times, I think it is safe to assume that there is only one true love, and certainly only one of me.

So revising your incremental method gives

Day 1 = 2

Day 2 = 2+(2x2) = 2+4 = 6

Day 3 = 6+(3x2) = 6+6 = 12

Day 4 = 12+(4x2) = 12+8 = 20

Day 5 = 20+(5x0) = 20+0 = 20

Day 6 = 20+(6x2) = 20+12 = 32

Day 7 = 32+(7x2) = 32+14 = 46

Day 8 = 46+(8x9) = 46+72 = 118 (assuming 8 milkmaids, 8 cows and 8 three-legged stools)

Day 9 = 118+(9x2) = 118 + 18 = 136

Day 10 = 136+(10x2) = 136+20 = 156

Day 11 = 156+(11x2) = 156+22 = 178

Day 12 = 178+(12x2) = 178+24 = 202

Total = 928, plus me and my true love = 932.

 

If you ignore the milking stools, the last five days becomes

Day 8 = 46+(8x6) = 46+48 = 94

Day 9 = 94+(9x2) = 94+18 = 112

Day 10 = 112+(10x2) = 112+20 = 132

Day 11 = 132+(11x2) = 132+22 = 154

Day 12 = 154+(12x2) = 154+24 = 178

Total = 808, plus me and my true love = 812 as stated earlier.

 

Boggin's Dad, have any of us hit the target yet?

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Ah, a debate on semantics, that could easily run to a dozen pages of intemperate shouting if this wasn't a civilised area ... :laughing:

If the " first person plus beloved" characters appear in each verse, and we assume they are the same individuals each day, how can we say the same french hens etc etc are not also re-deployed each day ? I can't tell chickens apart*, you could easily fool me by claiming these were entirely different to yesterdays fowl ...same for the other birds, none of which has the distinctive individually varied plumage which identifies budgies for instance  ...

Also, the initial question said ' How many legs ' , not how many different legs, so same beloved, same legs, different day = 2 more legs in the song  :lol:

I rest my case, (while suggesting that the problem lies with the phrasing of the question) and await the final authoritative verdict of the questioner (who is probably weeping softly over a calculator as I type) .

 

 

^ As an afterthought, I have farmer friends who have some rescued battery hens clucking round their yard, one of who (inevitably named 'Stumpy' ) I can distinguish from the rest,  but only because she would ruin the leg count with 1 .5 to her name  ... pretty sure she is not French though ....

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I am going to have to give this one to searcherdog, but a close second and congratulations to Hal-an-tow for getting full marks, as he showed all his working

My intitial sum led me to 928 - I was including the milking stool, but then had not added in me, and my true love....

So the answer I am going to judge as right is 976 which includes those extra 48 legs.

Well done searcherdog A very festive ding for you - Over to you

 

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Arrgh, I know I've heard of this folktale - it's similar to the Russian Baboushka  story* ... so it's not Russian, and I know the German and Austrian festive scare figures are male, so I'll have a guess at Swiss maybe ?

* Woman invited to accompany kings to visit baby Jesus thinks she is too busy with housework, turns down chance, thereafter roams earth for eternity trying to  make up for her choice. The moral of the story: ALWAYS abandon housework at the slightest pretext.  Works for me ...

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On the night of November 9th 1989 at 23:30 Lt.-Col. Harald Jäger, after being faced by a crowd of 20000 East German protesters, gave the order to the 46 armed guards at Bornholmer Straße to open the barriers and stand aside. With this historic order he opened the Berlin Wall.

For weeks, my wife and I had been following the events leading up to this because we have relatives living in East Germany.

The Ding goes to Boggin's Dad

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West Berlin was created in the aftermath of World War 2. It was an enclave within East Germany, and blockaded in the late 1940s; the only way to get supplies into the city was by air, and between June 1948 and September 1949 the Berlin Airlift delivered all the goods this city needed to function

My question is what was the area (in square kilometres) of West Berlin?

I will use the trusted higher/lower technique of getting closer should it not hit exactly.

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8 hours ago, speakers-corner said:

Thanks for the DING Boggin's Dad.

Going from geography to history with a 2-part question.

Who was the first English king to marry a German woman, and what was her name.

It depends whether you mean from Germany as a state, or from the region that is now called Germany. As the unified state we now call Germany didn't exist before the 19th Century, it will presumably be a king from the 20th Century, after Victoria. Although I don't know if she was German or not, I'll guess Mary of Teck, wife of George V.

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14 hours ago, Optimist on the run said:

It depends whether you mean from Germany as a state, or from the region that is now called Germany. As the unified state we now call Germany didn't exist before the 19th Century, it will presumably be a king from the 20th Century, after Victoria. Although I don't know if she was German or not, I'll guess Mary of Teck, wife of George V.

OK, you got me there. It is from the region that is now called Germany. Have another go.

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I will give the Ding to Optimist as he has in fact given me the names I was looking for.

The king was Henry VIII and his German wife was Anne of Cleves, or rather Anna von Kleve. She was born in Düsseldorf in 22.09.1515.

Catherine of Aragon - Spanish

Anne Boleyn - Norfolk

Jane Seymour - place of birth unknown but English

Catherine Howard - London

Catherine Parr - London

So, over to you.

Edited by speakers-corner
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