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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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As Gustav Holst was a 20th Century composer, I'll guess that he re-arranged the earlier Rosetti work?

No ding there I'm afraid, the chap you're thinking of was Rossetti with only one 's', unlike the two 's' Rossetti in question, who was not a musician.

 

If no one gets close by the end of today I'll add a hint.

 

No idea as to the Goblin reference above but I do know that Rossetti wrote 'in the bleak midwinter'. Someone must have set it to music so I'll hazard a guess it was our friend Gustav

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As Gustav Holst was a 20th Century composer, I'll guess that he re-arranged the earlier Rosetti work?

No ding there I'm afraid, the chap you're thinking of was Rossetti with only one 's', unlike the two 's' Rossetti in question, who was not a musician.

 

If no one gets close by the end of today I'll add a hint.

 

No idea as to the Goblin reference above but I do know that Rossetti wrote 'in the bleak midwinter'. Someone must have set it to music so I'll hazard a guess it was our friend Gustav

 

And the musical ding goes Sharpeset :D

Christina Rossetti (not her more famous artist father, Ihope, sorry, suspect that could have misdirected some ) was a poet, her most famous work is 'Goblin Market'. She wrote the words, Holst the music, to 'In the Bleak Midwinter'

 

I noticed Holsts name at the top of the page in my school hymn book way back in the last century, and it took me to other works by him, and on to Elgar. Vaughan Williams,Sibelius, then diverted off to find out about English folk music, Rusby, various Carthys and the blessed June Tabor and eventually I arrived at the Levellers and Oysterband. A strange musical journey, all started off by a carol I rather enjoyed!

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As Gustav Holst was a 20th Century composer, I'll guess that he re-arranged the earlier Rosetti work?

No ding there I'm afraid, the chap you're thinking of was Rossetti with only one 's', unlike the two 's' Rossetti in question, who was not a musician.

 

If no one gets close by the end of today I'll add a hint.

 

No idea as to the Goblin reference above but I do know that Rossetti wrote 'in the bleak midwinter'. Someone must have set it to music so I'll hazard a guess it was our friend Gustav

 

And the musical ding goes Sharpeset :D

Christina Rossetti (not her more famous artist father, Ihope, sorry, suspect that could have misdirected some ) was a poet, her most famous work is 'Goblin Market'. She wrote the words, Holst the music, to 'In the Bleak Midwinter'

 

I noticed Holsts name at the top of the page in my school hymn book way back in the last century, and it took me to other works by him, and on to Elgar. Vaughan Williams,Sibelius, then diverted off to find out about English folk music, Rusby, various Carthys and the blessed June Tabor and eventually I arrived at the Levellers and Oysterband. A strange musical journey, all started off by a carol I rather enjoyed!

 

Thanks - it's great how music can surprise and inspire. I'm going to stick with music for the next question, but slightly less classical:

 

Peter Tork, Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith..... who is missing?

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The Carthginians

 

Aplogies for the delay. I complety forgot. Have a belate Ding on me.

A belated ding feels more 'official' than a proxy ding, thank you, and thanks to TheOldfields for posting and thereby reminding you !

OK, new question then:

My sole source of knowledge about Ancient Rome is the novels of Steven Saylor, in particular I like his "Roma Sub Rosa" series of historical mysteries. What does 'sub rosa' mean ?

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after a question from Speakers corner

I can confirm the answer was bread

After checking. the first meal eaten on the moon was bacon,

But the first food eaten on the moon was communion bread

Quote

As Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin prepared to take “one small step for man,” Aldrin wanted to commemorate the moment in a way he found most personally meaningful — by taking communion.

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I just checked the Lunar 100 list and was surprised to see that whatever it is, it isn't listed as a significant Lunar feature for amateur astronomers to observe. That said, making this post gives me the chance to link the following image, which I captured a couple of weeks ago and of which I'm fairly pleased!

 

moon.jpg

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I just checked the Lunar 100 list and was surprised to see that whatever it is, it isn't listed as a significant Lunar feature for amateur astronomers to observe. That said, making this post gives me the chance to link the following image, which I captured a couple of weeks ago and of which I'm fairly pleased!

 

 

....and rightly so!

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