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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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Thanks. An American question, seeing as 4th July was this past weekend...

 

What distinction do Colorado and Wyoming have, that none of the other US states do? (Though North & South Dakota, Kansas & Pennsylvania are close!)

 

I'm going to guess this is the opposite of one of my favourite quiz questions (Which US State has NO straight line boundaries (answer = Hawaii))..... my guess is that they have ONLY straight line boundaries / borders.

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That's the Ding for UncleMalcy. They are the only states to be perfect rectangles. Although I should state that is in Mercator Projection - on the surface of our nearly spherical Earth none of the boundaries are straight lines (so the answer to the other question would be "all of them"!

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That's the Ding for UncleMalcy. They are the only states to be perfect rectangles. Although I should state that is in Mercator Projection - on the surface of our nearly spherical Earth none of the boundaries are straight lines (so the answer to the other question would be "all of them"!

 

Thanks for the ding.

Staying with US States, which State has the nickname "The Battleborn State" ??

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Hazard a guess at the Spey, as a lot of distilleries are in Speyside.

over to you for that whiskey flavored ding

 

Many thanks for that - can't stand the stuff myself - but lived close by for many years whilst in the RAF and took many visitors on the whisky trail around the distilleries.

 

Mr me N u

 

Next question - what is a snellen chart used for? (most people will have seen one at some stage in their life)

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I'll have a guess using the word 'seen' and go for the list of decreasing size letters you may or may not see at the optician.

 

Good guess! Over to you.

 

We only recently found out the name of the chart, apparently its named after a 19th century Dutch opthalmologist!

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George Joseph Smith

 

Wow, that was quick - the level of obscure knowledge on here never ceases to amaze me

 

Please accept the ding

the wife has a criminal psychology degree. I asked her.

 

. Which one of the following was NEVER a modern Olympic discipline?

a. tumbling

b. running deer shooting

c. horseshoes (throwing)

d. club swinging

e. tug of war

f. under water swimming

g. 200m obstacle swimming

lets see how meany guesses it takes.

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I guess f

 

I know that tug o war was a sport, but all the others.....

No ding for you I am afraid

In the interest of fairness, as the answers are there :yikes:

No second guess, till someone else has had a try, thank you. :rolleyes:

....

The men's underwater swimming was an event on the Swimming at the 1900 Summer Olympics schedule in Paris. The 1900 Games were the only occasion such an event was held. It was held on 12 August 1900. 14 swimmers from 4 nations competed. It was not featured at later Olympic games because of lack of spectator appeal.

Edited by martin&lindabryn
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I'll have a shot at horseshoe throwing.

 

That will be a ding for Hellfire

And if anyone’s interested, this is when all the other events appeared in the games

 

a. Tumbling

a. Certain black-and-white era mat events (hands up callisthenics) had all the acrobatic verve of school gymnastics certificate six, which, I recall, featured skills as demanding as the 'forward roll' and the gravity-defying 'standing up'. Tumbling, however, was no such primary-school farce. American Rowland 'Flip' Wolfe took gold in Los Angeles thanks to his revolutionary backflip with double twist, only to see the event flick-flack off the floor and into gymnastic history.

 

b. running deer shooting

b. The men's single-shot running deer competition was one of 15 shooting sports events on the Shooting at the 1908 Summer Olympics programme.[1] A deer-shaped target made 10 runs of 75 feet, with the shooter firing one shot during each run. The runs lasted about 4 seconds each and took place 110 yards distant from the shooter. There were three concentric circles on the target, with the smallest counting for 4 points, the middle for 3, and the outermost for 2. A hit outside the circles but still on the target (except on the haunch) counted for 1 point. The maximum possible score was thus 40 points.

 

c. horseshoes (throwing)

HAS NOT BEEN AN OLYMPIC EVENT.

 

d. club swinging

d. Not in fact a night out for bored couples, but an event that involved swinging a club festooned with ribbons very quickly around the body and head, in a complicated routine. At the 1932 Games, American George Roth displayed a level of dedication seldom seen in the modern Olympic era. It was the Great Depression and Roth was unemployed and hungry. Yet he won gold. Seconds after being awarded his medal in front of 60,000 spectators, he walked out of the stadium in Los Angeles and hitchhiked home.

 

e. tug of war

e. Entertainment for West Country cider heads during the summer fête? Tell that to the ancient Greeks, renowned for their physical and intellectual stamina, who staged their first tug in 500BC. In modern Olympic rules, a team of eight had to pull the opposition six feet to win, but if no such drama had occurred after five minutes, the side who had pulled their opponents the furthest triumphed. London 1908 saw the sport at its most intense, when America were beaten in just a few short seconds by Great Britain. The unhappy losers accused Team GB, all of them policemen, of wearing illegal spiked boots, so we offered them a rematch in our socks ... and still stuffed them.

 

f. under water swimming

f. The men's underwater swimming was an event on the Swimming at the 1900 Summer Olympics schedule in Paris. The 1900 Games were the only occasion such an event was held. It was held on 12 August 1900. 14 swimmers from 4 nations competed. It was not featured at later Olympic games because of lack of spectator appeal

 

g. 200m obstacle swimming

g. The men's 200 metre obstacle event was an event in the 1900 Summer Olympics held in Paris. The 1900 Games were the only occasion such an event was held. It was held on 11 August and 12 August 1900. Twelve swimmers from five nations competed.There were three obstacles throughout the 200 metre course. Swimmers had to climb over the first two (a pole and a row of boats), and swim under the third (another row of boats)

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IIRC, the 1948 games were in London and that city was the 'de-facto' host because it was one of the two cities that should have hosted the wartime games. The other was Tokyo, which IIRC forfeited the games because of war with China and the games were then awarded to Helsinki, but did not then happen because of the war. Thus immediately before the start of WWII, the two cities intended to host the Summer Olympics were London and Helsinki.

 

However, three cities were supposed to have hosted the games: London, Tokyo and Helsinki (but not necessarily in that order!)

Edited by Pajaholic
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Thanks for the ding. Still thinking about the Olympics- Winter and Summer- Who was the first sports person disqualified and banned after drug testing was introduced in 1967?

 

 

I'm sure it was one of the Scandanavians who tested positive for alcohol in 68 (Good job I'm not a competitor). I may have to resort to Wiki as my memory won't store the Scandanavian names!! I think he was stripped of his medal.

Edited by UncleMalcy
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Thanks for the ding. Still thinking about the Olympics- Winter and Summer- Who was the first sports person disqualified and banned after drug testing was introduced in 1967?

 

 

I'm sure it was one of the Scandanavians who tested positive for alcohol in 68 (Good job I'm not a competitor). I may have to resort to Wiki as my memory won't store the Scandanavian names!! I think he was stripped of his medal.

I know it was a bronze medal. Dont know his name or what sport it was.

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That's the ding- well done.

 

Thanks... I did have a little peek - does that make me a bad person??

 

An easy one then. Who is this??

 

Belarusian-born, she started training at age 8, entered a Belarusian sports school headed by coach Renald Knysh at age 9. First trainer was Elena Volchetskaya, an Olympic gold medalist but she was moved to Knysh's group a year later. Initially he found her "lazy and capricious" but he also saw potential in her great talent, unusually supple spine, and charisma. With him, she learned a difficult backward somersault on the balance beam. She debuted this at a competition in the USSR in 1969. In the same year, she completed a backflip-to-catch on the uneven bars; this was the first backward release move ever performed by a woman on bars.

Edited by UncleMalcy
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That's the ding- well done.

 

Thanks... I did have a little peek - does that make me a bad person??

 

An easy one then. Who is this??

 

My link

 

Clue : 1972

 

Had a little peek at what UncleMalcy ?

 

I just couldn't dredge up the name (I don't find Swedish names easy - it took me a month to read "The girl with the dragon tattoo") so I had a little peek at Wikipedia.

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That's the ding- well done.

 

Thanks... I did have a little peek - does that make me a bad person??

 

An easy one then. Who is this??

 

My link

 

Clue : 1972

 

Had a little peek at what UncleMalcy ?

 

I just couldn't dredge up the name (I don't find Swedish names easy - it took me a month to read "The girl with the dragon tattoo") so I had a little peek at Wikipedia.

 

So your advice would be, whenever we don't know the answer, to search for it ?

 

I don't have time to look for the relevant quote from Simply Paul - something along the lines of no googling - but doesn't it seem contrary to basic fairness ?

 

Would you do this in a pub quiz ?

 

Is there any point in attempting to compete with you ?

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That's the ding- well done.

 

Thanks... I did have a little peek - does that make me a bad person??

 

An easy one then. Who is this??

 

My link

 

Clue : 1972

 

Had a little peek at what UncleMalcy ?

 

I just couldn't dredge up the name (I don't find Swedish names easy - it took me a month to read "The girl with the dragon tattoo") so I had a little peek at Wikipedia.

 

So your advice would be, whenever we don't know the answer, to search for it ?

 

I don't have time to look for the relevant quote from Simply Paul - something along the lines of no googling - but doesn't it seem contrary to basic fairness ?

 

Would you do this in a pub quiz ?

 

Is there any point in attempting to compete with you ?

 

You are, of course, entirely correct.

The answer to my last question was "Olga Korbut"

I will pass the baton to you, Civilised, and will withdraw from the forum with my tail between my legs, suitably scalded.

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