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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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I'll set the next question, to keep this thread going. I hope MartyBartfast doesn't mind.

 

If all the Commonwealth games medals ever awarded to each individual country/territory were converted to one point for bronze, two for silver and three for gold ('medal points'), and the population divided by the medal points total, which country/territory would score the highest and in what single sport have they won all their medals?

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If this doesn't work, I'll give in. I've tried entering just a zero ("0") four times and the forum software has rejected my post. I guess it doesn't like it if you just enter nothing!

crb11 He indeed gave nothing to the world around 800BC as he wouldn't be alive for over 1500 years. B) I think you mean about AD800! (Pajaholic has it.)

 

That’s a ding for getting Nothing right Pajaholic

And I did mean 800 BC crb11

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Thanks.

 

On to an allied topic: In scientific and engineering terms, velocity is the first derivative of position (i.e. v = dx/dt); acceleration is the second derivative (or rate of change of velocity -- i.e. a = dv/dt).

 

For the ding, what is the third derivative of position (or rate of change of acceleration) called?

For a bonus point, what is the fourth derivative (rate of change of the answer above) called?

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Thanks.

 

On to an allied topic: In scientific and engineering terms, velocity is the first derivative of position (i.e. v = dx/dt); acceleration is the second derivative (or rate of change of velocity -- i.e. a = dv/dt).

 

For the ding, what is the third derivative of position (or rate of change of acceleration) called?

For a bonus point, what is the fourth derivative (rate of change of the answer above) called?

 

The 3rd is Jerk, and the 4th is called Jounce or Snap.

 

Fun fact: the 4th, 5th, and 6th are sometimes called Snap, Crackle, and Pop. :lol:

 

Haven't though of this stuff since University (physics degree). Never thought I'd remember this stuff. I guess it's because of the advert.

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Originally, many years ago, the forerunner to this thread (accidently locked by an over enthusiastic, inexperienced but well meaning moderator) set simple rules - one of which I recently posted here - all about the questions being of a standard that could be answered in your average pub quiz.

 

Some of you must drink in pubs whose clientele are exceptionally gifted Oxbridge dons or PhDs!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Originally, many years ago, the forerunner to this thread (accidently locked by an over enthusiastic, inexperienced but well meaning moderator) set simple rules - one of which I recently posted here - all about the questions being of a standard that could be answered in your average pub quiz.

 

Some of you must drink in pubs whose clientele are exceptionally gifted Oxbridge dons or PhDs!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I don't know what you mean... these questions come up quite regularly in the pub quiz at my local, the Higgs & Boson ;-)

 

Fair point, although momentum is covered in the A level Further Maths Syllabus (and I dare say Physics too) I'm sure it was touched on when I did GCSE Science in the 90s.

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If you asked for the oldest currently inhabited city, I'd have gone for Jericho. However, contemporary archeoblogical evidence supports the biblical tale of the sacking of Jericho and that it was abandoned for a time afterwards - dating that to somewhere between 2,000 and 1,000 BC. So Jericho fails the "continously inhabited" criterion. ISTR that Damascus is nearly as old, so that's what I'll plump for!

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If you asked for the oldest currently inhabited city, I'd have gone for Jericho. However, contemporary archeoblogical evidence supports the biblical tale of the sacking of Jericho and that it was abandoned for a time afterwards - dating that to somewhere between 2,000 and 1,000 BC. So Jericho fails the "continously inhabited" criterion. ISTR that Damascus is nearly as old, so that's what I'll plump for!

Damascus will get you the ding. over to you

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Thanks.

 

Staying with Old Testament times: The plagues, the pillars of fire and smoke, and the parting of the sea described in the Exodus have been ascribed to a geological event. Your task is to name that event!

 

The second and third parts sound like the forming of new land by way of volcanic activity but I'm not sure how the first part would fit in to that.

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I think it's the volcanic eruption of Thera (the same one that is attributed to wiping out the Minoan civilisation). Most of the plagues come about through dust in the atmosphere affecting local climate. Colin Humphries, who wrote the book (or at least a book) claiming all this, happens to be a friend and colleague, but I still don't find it very convincing!

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That'll get you the DING!

 

The plagues were attributed both to dust and to the result of seismic activity .. With the first born allegedly due to a combination of CO2 released by seismic activity and it being customary for the eldest male child to sleep nearest to the door.

 

Over to crb11 ...

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