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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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TBO, the only one I recognised was Django Reinhardt, who I knew did a lot of work with Grappelli.

 

On the subject of fiddlers, which fiddler would you find in Union Station?

 

That confused me for a moment then I realised you meant the band in which case it is Alison Krauss :)

 

Helen

Edited by Dobunnis
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It's been long time since we posted a question but here goes...

 

Robert G Heft at the age of 17 famously managed to get the grade on a school project upgraded from a B- to an A by winning a bet with his tutor. What was the project about and how did he win?

 

No takers? Would it help to know the project was done in 1958?

 

Helen

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This was annoying me so I checked and I was right. But by checking, I've excluded myself. D'oh! I really am flagging at this quiz lark... :anicute:

 

That at least suggests that it is known even if only in the darkest recesses of the mind :ph34r:

 

That must be the longest we have had a question last and I am not trying to stitch you up either. I had a series of hints but never thought I would get to use them.

 

So... does it help to know it was in the USA?

 

Helen

Edited by Dobunnis
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This was annoying me so I checked and I was right. But by checking, I've excluded myself. D'oh! I really am flagging at this quiz lark... :anicute:

 

That at least suggests that it is known even if only in the darkest recesses of the mind :ph34r:

 

That must be the longest we have had a question last and I am not trying to stich you up either. I had a series of hints but never thought I would get to use them.

 

So... does it help to know it was in the USA?

 

Helen

 

When this question was first published, I thought I knew the name, but had no idea from where.

But with the clues above, wasn’t he the creator of the stars and stripes flag.

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When this question was first published, I thought I knew the name, but had no idea from where.

But with the clues above, wasn’t he the creator of the stars and stripes flag.

 

DING

 

Heft designed the current U.S. flag in 1958 while living with his grandparents. He was 17 years old at the time and did the flag design as a high school class project. He un-stitched the blue field from a family 48-star flag, sewed in a new field, and used iron-on white fabric to add 100 hand-cut stars, 50 on each side of the blue canton.

 

Heft originally received a B- for the project. After discussing the grade with his high school teacher, Stanley Pratt, it was agreed that if the flag was accepted by the United States Congress, the grade would be reconsidered. Heft's flag design was chosen and adopted by presidential proclamation after Alaska and before Hawaii were admitted into the union in 1959. According to Heft, his teacher honored their agreement and changed his grade to an A for the project.

 

When Alaska and Hawaii were being considered for statehood, more than 1,500 designs were spontaneously submitted to President Dwight D. Eisenhower by Americans. At least three, and probably more, of these designs were identical to Heft's adopted design of the 50-star flag. Archived in the Eisenhower Presidential Center in Abilene, Kansas, only a small fraction of the proposed designs have ever been published.

 

On December 12, 2009, he died from a heart attack at the age of 68.

 

Over to martin&lindabryn...

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I'll accede to Paul on that one, his was most not rectangular after all!
Thanks for that Beach hut. Its over to Simply Paul. Ding Ding
Thanks for that. For the sake of completeness, the Vatican flag is also square.

 

Staying with flags, the image below was taken from a place which has an unofficial flag of red, green and blue, split vertically into thirds, with red closest to the flag pole. It will help if you know what the picture is of. B)

 

f2fb6880-22f3-4bf7-a271-f0fe931ec68a.gif

Edited by Simply Paul
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Knowing your fascination with anything to do with space/astronomy, it's got to be somewhere 'out there' where mankind has plonked a camera and where there's either no atmosphere or it's transparent enough to permit photography. So that gives Mars, the Moon, Europa, and (perhaps) Ganymede. The subject has to be either a planetary satellite or a close-passing asteroid. The object in the 'background' could possibly be Earth.

 

So my best guess is that the photo was taken from Mars and is of one of Mars's moons (further guessing: Phobos?)

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Close enough for a Ding! That's both of Mars's moons, shot in real time by Curiosity this August, as Phobos overtook Deimos in its orbit and eclipsed it. Phobos was once thought to be artificial as it's very light (low in mass) for its size. It's also very dark in colour for a natural object. It orbits just 3,700 miles above the surface of Mars, making the two bodies the closest known orbiters in the solar system. Compare the 239,000 miles from the Earth to our Moon. Phobos rotates around Mars so quickly that, although its orbit isn't retrograde, it rises in the west and sets in the east. Here's a bit about the Mars flag.

Edited by Simply Paul
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I left this a while, but I was often the only kid with his hand up at school...

 

The problem came with the plural for Canale - the Italian for groove or channel - being Canali. To English ears, that meant canal; artificial structures. So we're looking for an Italian, with a telescope. I'd guess at Galileo but I suspect it's someone considerably later for the way it caught the public imagination rather than resulted in religious genocide. I know Cassini was later, but late enough? Not sure. But he's my guess :)

Edited by Simply Paul
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Not Da Vinci. :)

 

Scarpelli is getting very close indeed but it's not right although the date is definitely in the ballpark. The study was undertaken in Mars' opposition of 1877. The astronomer was the first to identify the 'canali' later misinterpreted as 'canal' as mentioned by Simply Paul in an earlier post.

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