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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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Thanks. *Twok* Since the Space Shuttles were retired in 2011, NASA have been working on a replacement but it's a very interesting development that private enterprise is making a real inroad into space. Going back a generation, Shuttle missions were all named STS and then numbered, eg STS-31 to launch the Hubble space telescope, and STS-61, to fix it. But what does STS stand for?

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At last one I know thanks to James May. Lego as we know it was 1st produced in 1949, but the company that makes it started making wooden toys 1932 and changed its name to Lego in 1934 (cant remember what it was called before).

In which country?

 

Denmark - we've driven passed the factory when we visited Lego land in Denmark last year! :) also got a couple of caches (and a souvenir now) whilst we were there :)

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Space Transportation System. :)
Advantage, Betelgeuse. Ding! The Space Transportation System was intended to be a whole set of modular craft, including a space tug (designed to be left in orbit and crewed and refilled as necessary) for inter-orbital work, a replacement for Apollo which would be good for setting up a moon base and a reusable 'space truck' which became the Shuttle. With the success of Apollo 11 and the winning of that phase of the Space Race, Nixon and Congress decided not to fund a Mars trip in the 'post-Apollo era', and as the final three planned moon landings were pulled, it was clear budgets were only going south. NASA's grand plans for fleets of nuclear-powered ships, stations - including a Luna-orbit Skylab - and bases were shelved, along with promising technology such as NERVA high-ISP nuclear engines. A good book on 'what might have been' is Stephen Baxter's Voyage. Which he wrote about 10 miles from my home, in Great Missendon. Small world ;)
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America's space shuttles were retired from service in 2011 - or were they?

 

America still has three shuttles in service. For the DING! Can you tell me either:

 

Their flight designation OR the manufacturer and model?

 

If you can answer both then expect a black helicopter or two overhead. ;)

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That'll get you the DING!

 

Boeing X-37B is correct. The USAF have 3 of them in service - they were intended to be launched from the NASA shuttle originally, but it was decided that it wasn't an economical launch system and so they are now strapped to an Atlas V. They're unmanned and designed to stay in orbit for up to 270 days at a time.

 

The flight designation is OTV (Orbital Test Vehicle) 1, 2 and 3.

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That would be Voyager 1 and it's said to have left the influence of the Sun although that's a statement that's being argued at present. The evidence for this is a sudden decrease in solar particles and a corresponding increase in cosmic rays. If it hasn't already, then it'll exit the region of the heliopause some time soon.

 

Voyager 2 is still within the influence of the Sun but is also at the heliopause. The missions of both are expected to last until around 2025 when the radiothermal generators that power them will finally stop producing sufficient power to maintain operation of the transmitters. Fantastic stuff really. :)

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That would be Voyager 1 and it's said to have left the influence of the Sun although that's a statement that's being argued at present. The evidence for this is a sudden decrease in solar particles and a corresponding increase in cosmic rays. If it hasn't already, then it'll exit the region of the heliopause some time soon.

 

Voyager 2 is still within the influence of the Sun but is also at the heliopause. The missions of both are expected to last until around 2025 when the radiothermal generators that power them will finally stop producing sufficient power to maintain operation of the transmitters. Fantastic stuff really. :)

 

That’s a ding. Thought that may have lasted longer than that

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Too many space geeks in here for a question like that to last. :laughing:

 

Staying with Voyager 1 for a while longer, it's mission trajectory was altered to take it out of the plane of the ecliptic and it's 'grand tour' of the solar system terminated leaving Voyager 2 to complete that part of the mission.

 

Why was the trajectory altered?

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To visit Titan?

 

That will get you the DING!

 

A year before Voyager's encounter with Saturn, Pioneer 11 had detected a thick atmosphere around Titan and the mission controllers decided that it was too good an opportunity to miss - they were in the unusual position of having two craft and being able to 'sacrifice' one to perform some important science on this strange moon. They knew that the encounter would impart a gravitational slingshot effect and propel it out of the plane of the ecliptic effectively ending its planetary mission.

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