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The All New All New Groundspeak UK Pub Quiz


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In some quarters 28th June just gone was referred as 'Tau Day': To what does 'Tau' refer?

 

Somewhere along the lies of the mathamatical bods want a new number.

 

Tau is equal to 2x Pi

 

The number is 628 the date written in the non-UK format.

 

DING! Over to you

 

Pete

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My question is who are the only football club to have sacked Sir Alex Ferguson during his long managerial career?

My guess is that it'd be early in his career as a manager. He's a Glaswegian, so I'm guessing one of the Glasgow and surrounding area clubs like Partick Thistle, Queens Park, Clydebank, Dunbarton, St Mirren, etc.

 

I've got to pick one, so stab in the dark: Partick Thistle?

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For a minute I was thinking of "Brian and Michael" who did "Matchstalk men and matchstalk cats and dogs" but that was later and I can't imagine they were anybodies favourite band unless jady1987's dad was seriously weird.

 

I think the right answer is the mighty "Status Quo"

 

Edit to add: AArrrgggghhh, beaten by 2 mins. That'll teach me to just whack down the answer without all the verbiage !!!!!!

Edited by MartyBartfast
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Most of the horses we think of as "White" are actually greys (their skin is grey) - could it be the Camargue horses are truly white?

That's not it, but you're close. (They are grey, as a breed).

Though extra QI points awarded to you for knowing that white looking horses are usually said to have grey coats. (Horses that appear white have grey coats if their skin is black, or dark in places and their eyes are dark. True 'white' horses with pink skin and sometimes blue eyes are relatively unusual.)

So what else is it about the Camargues that is remarkable?

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Most of the horses we think of as "White" are actually greys (their skin is grey) - could it be the Camargue horses are truly white?

IIRC, they are officially 'grey' (i.e. dark skinned with white hair). However, the most interesting thing ISTR is that they don't all start out that way. Some are born a different colour but no matter what colour they are as foals they all turn white by the time they're adults?

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Fianccetto is closest, but still wide of the mark.

 

TBH, it's the sort of thing you either know or don't, but in the appropriate circles the Gimli Glider is as notable as the colour of Camargue horses is to equestrians. That said, there have been several documentaries and at least one related movie, and ISTR there also being a mention on the 'QI' TV quiz show!

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It was a boeing jet, forced to glide... Not a 747, I remember that much...

 

It was a 757 or a 767

We crossed!

 

I'll give you a 'ding' for that.

 

The Gimli Glider is or was Boeing 767-233 registration C-GAUN, operated by Air Canada and retired in January 2008. It has the distinction of being the first wide-bodied jet airliner to be glided to a safe emergency landing, which was achieved on the 23rd July 1983 as flight AC143 after a sequence of errors and misfortune conspired to put the aircraft into a fuel emergency mid-flight at 41,000 feet.

 

The 767 has a glass cockpit, which meant that when the engines died and the power went out they lost most of their instrumentation. The 767 was also the airline's first 'metric' type. The fuel gauge computer was defective and no spare was available, so they elected to proceed using the flight computer (which replaced the human flight engineer of older types) into which they'd manually enter the amount of fuel carried.

 

The aircraft needed 23,500 kg of fuel for the flight. Now while the aircrew consider fuel in terms of its weight the fuellers consider it in terms of volume and so each time they refuelled an aircraft they had to calculate the volume of fuel required from the mass requested by the flight crew. The fuellers erroneously took the requested mass to be in pounds and so AC143 took off with 23,500 lbs of fuel - i.e. only about half the 23,500 kg of fuel required for the flight.

 

When they ran out of fuel, they selected the ex-military airfield at Gimli to which to divert. This was partly because the co-pilot had trained there during his military career and so knew the airfield. However, unknown to the crew, the runway had been converted to a drag strip and there was a meeting that weekend. As the stricken aircraft approached the runway, the co-pilot calculated they would overshoot and that they didn't have enough height to make a 360° turn. They'd lost power and so didn't have either flaps or spoilers available to them. However, the pilot also flew gliders and ultralights, in which sideslipping is often used. So he sideslipped the aircraft to lose enough height without gaining airspeed, and went on to make a safe landing.

 

For those interested, the whole story (as told by the 'Air Crash Investigations' TV show) can be seen in five parts starting at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yP1_k3QCohU, and there's a photo of her taken the day she retired at http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=6158179.

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Fianccetto is closest, but still wide of the mark.

 

TBH, it's the sort of thing you either know or don't, but in the appropriate circles the Gimli Glider is as notable as the colour of Camargue horses is to equestrians. That said, there have been several documentaries and at least one related movie, and ISTR there also being a mention on the 'QI' TV quiz show!

If it is a glider, the only ones that come to mind are the old Second World War ones, like were used in Operation Market Garden, as A Bridge Too Far for the movies.

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It was a boeing jet, forced to glide... Not a 747, I remember that much...

 

It was a 757 or a 767

We crossed!

 

I'll give you a 'ding' for that.

 

The Gimli Glider is or was Boeing 767-233 registration C-GAUN, operated by Air Canada and retired in January 2008. It has the distinction of being the first wide-bodied jet airliner to be glided to a safe emergency landing, which was achieved on the 23rd July 1983 as flight AC143 after a sequence of errors and misfortune conspired to put the aircraft into a fuel emergency mid-flight at 41,000 feet.

 

The 767 has a glass cockpit, which meant that when the engines died and the power went out they lost most of their instrumentation. The 767 was also the airline's first 'metric' type. The fuel gauge computer was defective and no spare was available, so they elected to proceed using the flight computer (which replaced the human flight engineer of older types) into which they'd manually enter the amount of fuel carried.

 

The aircraft needed 23,500 kg of fuel for the flight. Now while the aircrew consider fuel in terms of its weight the fuellers consider it in terms of volume and so each time they refuelled an aircraft they had to calculate the volume of fuel required from the mass requested by the flight crew. The fuellers erroneously took the requested mass to be in pounds and so AC143 took off with 23,500 lbs of fuel - i.e. only about half the 23,500 kg of fuel required for the flight.

 

When they ran out of fuel, they selected the ex-military airfield at Gimli to which to divert. This was partly because the co-pilot had trained there during his military career and so knew the airfield. However, unknown to the crew, the runway had been converted to a drag strip and there was a meeting that weekend. As the stricken aircraft approached the runway, the co-pilot calculated they would overshoot and that they didn't have enough height to make a 360° turn. They'd lost power and so didn't have either flaps or spoilers available to them. However, the pilot also flew gliders and ultralights, in which sideslipping is often used. So he sideslipped the aircraft to lose enough height without gaining airspeed, and went on to make a safe landing.

 

For those interested, the whole story (as told by the 'Air Crash Investigations' TV show) can be seen in five parts starting at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yP1_k3QCohU, and there's a photo of her taken the day she retired at http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=6158179.

Didn't know all of that... Amazing story.

 

Ok...

 

I was world speedway champion, and defended my title, successfully, on home soil. I then, turned my back on the sport, and retired to make chips. Who am I?

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