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Old Fashioned


b_storch
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Okay, I am totally new to all of this, so I'm sorry if someone has already asked this. Anyway, does anyone use a map and a compass for this? I have used a map and compass since I was old enough to hold them, and never had a problem finding latitude and longitude coordinates. I expect to embark on all my upcoming cache adventures by using both GPS and compass, but I was just curious if anyone out there did things the old fashioned way.

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Okay, I am totally new to all of this, so I'm sorry if someone has already asked this. Anyway, does anyone use a map and a compass for this? I have used a map and compass since I was old enough to hold them, and never had a problem finding latitude and longitude coordinates. I expect to embark on all my upcoming cache adventures by using both GPS and compass, but I was just curious if anyone out there did things the old fashioned way.

Welcome to the forum from another GeoNoob.

 

I've wondered the same thing.

 

Before I tried Geocaching I harassed one of my friends that Geocached, that the GPS makes it too easy ( I believed that until I actually did a few caches). Finding the Waypoint for most of the caches isn't really the challenge, finding the cache is the hard part. Find them however you want. I would recommend the everybody carry a compass and have a basic knowledge of how to use it.

 

For a lot of the caches around here (NW Oregon) you don't really need a GPS or Compass. Just Google Map the Lat & Lon and you have a detailed aerial picture of exactly where to start. Combined with the cache description it really is easy to get to the right spot.

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I hear you about the cold. Went looking for my first cache yesterday but was hampered by snow drifts, and about 2 feet of packed snow around the cache area. I wanted to look for other caches in the area, but the roads further into this area were covered with snow and ice and I didn't want to get stuck out in the middle of nowhere. guess I'll wait until the temp warms up and the snow melts a little.

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I hear you about the cold. Went looking for my first cache yesterday but was hampered by snow drifts, and about 2 feet of packed snow around the cache area. I wanted to look for other caches in the area, but the roads further into this area were covered with snow and ice and I didn't want to get stuck out in the middle of nowhere. guess I'll wait until the temp warms up and the snow melts a little.

Which one were you looking for? Sounds like it was up toward the summit. Maybe one of mine??

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Which one were you looking for? Sounds like it was up toward the summit. Maybe one of mine??

 

I was going to look for this one first: Rock and a Hard Place but the roads into this area were not really bad shape, and it would have been a long hike in a nice fridged breeze to look for it.

 

So I got into the area of this one Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini But the area was covered in a snow pack, and the roads past this area, going deeper back into the boonies, were in bad shape so I called it a day.

 

Was the first day of caching, not a good start, but once the weather warms up, I'll be in the hills alot with flyrod in one hand GPS in the other.

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Which one were you looking for? Sounds like it was up toward the summit. Maybe one of mine??

 

I was going to look for this one first: Rock and a Hard Place but the roads into this area were not really bad shape, and it would have been a long hike in a nice fridged breeze to look for it.

 

So I got into the area of this one Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini But the area was covered in a snow pack, and the roads past this area, going deeper back into the boonies, were in bad shape so I called it a day.

 

Was the first day of caching, not a good start, but once the weather warms up, I'll be in the hills alot with flyrod in one hand GPS in the other.

Tough area for winter caching. I got to plan a trip over there when things thaw out some.

 

Try my Flood Prone cache right in Cheyenne.

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Okay, I am totally new to all of this, so I'm sorry if someone has already asked this. Anyway, does anyone use a map and a compass for this? I have used a map and compass since I was old enough to hold them, and never had a problem finding latitude and longitude coordinates. I expect to embark on all my upcoming cache adventures by using both GPS and compass, but I was just curious if anyone out there did things the old fashioned way.

 

I've always wanted to try it this way, but i've never learned orienteering. <_<

 

Hmmm... maybe that will be the next project :(

 

Any suggestions on the best way to learn the skills needed? With all the hiking and paddling I do, I really should knw this stuff already. Besides, if the batteries die... :(

Edited by wandererrob
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The best book I have found for learning those skills is called Wilderness Navigation: Finding Your Way Using Map, Compass, Altimeter, and GPS by Bob and Mike Burns and can be found on Amazon for about ten bucks. Even though the subject matter isn't hard, I would suggest taking a class so that you can ask questions if you get confused.

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... Just keep in mind that you are expected to use a GPS when hiding a cache.

GC doesn't expect this; as long as you use the correct datum, you can use any method to provide coordinates. Of course, using a GPS will be relatively accurate, there are other means.

A local cacher used Google Earth to obtain coords for their caches. The coords would sometimes be off by 30 feet, but the caches were always found.

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... Just keep in mind that you are expected to use a GPS when hiding a cache.

GC doesn't expect this; as long as you use the correct datum, you can use any method to provide coordinates. Of course, using a GPS will be relatively accurate, there are other means.

A local cacher used Google Earth to obtain coords for their caches. The coords would sometimes be off by 30 feet, but the caches were always found.

 

The guidelines say....

You as the owner of the cache must visit the site and obtain the coordinates with a GPS. If time allows take several reading at different times over a few days and average the results. This will help you achieve greater accuracy on your coordinates. GPS usage is an essential element of geocaching. Therefore, although it is possible to find a cache without a GPS, the option of using accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the cache hunt must be demonstrated for all physical cache submissions.

 

See the guidelines above

Edited by StarBrand
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You as the owner of the cache must visit the site and obtain the coordinates with a GPS. If time allows take several reading at different times over a few days and average the results. This will help you achieve greater accuracy on your coordinates. GPS usage is an essential element of geocaching. Therefore, although it is possible to find a cache without a GPS, the option of using accurate GPS coordinates as an integral part of the cache hunt must be demonstrated for all physical cache submissions.

 

But how would they know?

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I always have a local topo map and compass. When technology fails, always have a back up plan.

What would you say is a decent compass for a reasonable price? I agree that a backup to gps could a real lifesaver. I definitely would need to learn how to navigate with it though.

 

Thanx,

Ray

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I always have a local topo map and compass. When technology fails, always have a back up plan.

What would you say is a decent compass for a reasonable price? I agree that a backup to gps could a real lifesaver. I definitely would need to learn how to navigate with it though.

 

Thanx,

Ray

Sound advise. I always have compass and topo maps as well. For general positioning, I have a couple of topo map books that are based on USGS Maps, one covers all of Washington and the other covers all of Oregon. I buy individual USGS maps for the areas that I need accurate positioning.

 

I would recommend a US military lensatic compass. I have one that I have used for years. They are rugged, easy to use and will last forever. You can get them at your local military surplus store or on-line - The Compass Store.

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Here are some useful links for Land Navigation:

 

http://www.learn-orienteering.org/old/

http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/seg/gmag/fldsnth1.pl

http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/manual/mapcompass.shtml

http://www.edu-observatory.org/gps/gps.html

http://www.trailsillustrated.com/skills/glossary.cfm

http://topomaps.usgs.gov/

 

And the following link is my favorite for Land Navigation:

http://members.impulse.net/~mlynch/trg_nav.html

 

The Compasses that I own and use in my land navigation class are.

1.Suunto M-2D Baseplate Real good for its price.

2.Brunton - Sighting Compass For the advanced classes.

3.Brunton 54LU My next compass to be bought. Its one of the few if only baseplate compass that is also useful for sighting.

 

Probably the most useful compass is the baseplate, it can do map work etc, once you figure out all of its tricks.

 

Then after the compass learn how to use UTM's, then your GPS & Map can talk to each other and the grid lines are good and useful for compass work.

Any other questions just E Mail and I'll help where I can.

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