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instafar
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So, what type of cache would be worthy of a "parking lot" attribute?

 

The grimy asphalt slab behind the local auto parts store, the scenic vista point next to the fascinating historical marker, and the wide dirt clearing at the end of the 4x4 trail could all easily be considered "parking lots."

 

How close to the cache would I have to be able to park? 10 feet? 100 feet? Would it have to actually be IN the parking lot? What if it was just barely outside the parking lot? Would it have to be at the same elevation as the parking? What if the cache let you park right next to a cliff, but you had to climb your way down to find it?

 

Would it really be that useful to you (that is, the collective "you") if cache owners had to ask themselves all those questions in decicing whether to use that icon? I bet I'd answer them differently than you would.

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The answer to that question is simple Andy.

 

A cache in a Wal Mart Parking lot, or shopping center cache would be worthy of the "Parking lot" attribute.

 

 

" the scenic vista point next to the fascinating historical marker,"

 

This would receive a "Scenic View" attribute. Too bad there isn't a "place of historic interest" attribute.

 

"and the wide dirt clearing at the end of the 4x4 trail could all easily be considered "parking lots."

 

That would qualify for the "Off-road vehicles" attribute.

 

What if the cache let you park right next to a cliff, but you had to climb your way down to find it?

A proper terrain rating would fix that.

 

The Five Star Terrain cache I found the other day had parking on a dirt shoulder, that could easily qualify as 1.5 star terrain, but the actual hunt, is where the cache earned it's high terrain rating.

Edited by Kit Fox
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So, a cache in a Wal-Mart parking lot would get a "parking lot" attribute, but not a cache in/near a parking lot for a vista point or a county park? I'm not sure I follow your logic.

 

If the idea is to weed out uninteresting caches, I don't think a "parking lot" attribute is necessarily going to be all that useful. I've been to plenty of cache sites that made a shopping center seem appealing by comparison. I think it's pretty well established that people use the attribute functions very differently from each other, if at all.

 

I think it's already pretty easy to decide whether a cache is likely to be in a parking lot...Using your examples, if I saw a cache that had a really low difficulty/terrain rating, without the "scenic view" or "off road vehicle" attributes selected, and with the "parking nearby" attribute selected, it's a pretty good possibility it might be in a parking lot.

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So, a cache in a Wal-Mart parking lot would get a "parking lot" attribute, but not a cache in/near a parking lot for a vista point or a county park? I'm not sure I follow your logic.

 

If the idea is to weed out uninteresting caches, I don't think a "parking lot" attribute is necessarily going to be all that useful. I've been to plenty of cache sites that made a shopping center seem appealing by comparison. I think it's pretty well established that people use the attribute functions very differently from each other, if at all.

 

I think it's already pretty easy to decide whether a cache is likely to be in a parking lot...Using your examples, if I saw a cache that had a really low difficulty/terrain rating, without the "scenic view" or "off road vehicle" attributes selected, and with the "parking nearby" attribute selected, it's a pretty good possibility it might be in a parking lot.

 

I'm not arguing with your logic, I'm just asking for "extra tools" to weed out the kind of cache I dislike. The only way I do it, is by terrain rating, which is imperfect. I Could care less if cachers enjoy finding caches underneath lampposts, and shady parking lots/back allies. I just wish there was a faster way to weed these caches out.

 

Incidentally, I'm a big fan of using bookmark lists of other cachers who like the same kind of caches as I do. An example is Rob Dogg's must do list. I also bookmark great caches, and share the lists with everyone.

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So, a cache in a Wal-Mart parking lot would get a "parking lot" attribute, but not a cache in/near a parking lot for a vista point or a county park? I'm not sure I follow your logic.
I can answer your question. You keep all caches that have either the Scenic View attribute or the Historical Site attribute (which doesn't exist yet). Then you blow out all the caches with the Parking Lot attribute that are left. Edited by TrailGators
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Based on what Briansnat, ClanRiffster, CoyoteRed, Drat19, Instafar, Kit Fox, The WhiteUrkel and many many others have written, I bet all of us pretty much like/dislike the same kind of caches. I really see a clear divide between the people that enjoy finding microspew and us. I also think that the more you cache the more likely you are to get bored with microspew.
In that case, my method should work great for all of you.

 

BTW, you realize that I've cached for longer than probably everyone on your list, right?

Edited by sbell111
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It's amazing that you think you are so psychic that you know all the research I've done and how I've formed my opinion. I've talked to tons cachers outside of the forums. Give me freaking a break! :huh: Rather than argue let's conduct a poll with these three questions:

 

Which do you prefer?

a) Caches that are hidden in interesting places

b.) Caches hidden in parking lots

c) Any cache is fine with me

 

Are numbers important to you?

a) Yes

b.) No

c) Sort of

 

How long have you been caching?

a) Less than one year

b.) 1-3 years

c) More than 3 years

As far as I can tell, you've done no real research at all. Also, I'm not sure what that poll would tell you even if you were able to get a response from all geocachers. (My answers are C,B,C, by the way.)
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The first lightpole skirt cache I found I thought was very cool -- I'd never seen it and didn't know you could hide stuff under there. It was also in the parking lot of a park, not a store, and it was the first stage of a multi that was in the park, not a micro cache unto itself. Now, though, I don't even bother with them.

 

The plus side is, now that I know about the skirts and most non-cachers don't, I've used them to hide my keys when I want to lock my car and don't want to carry them (e.g. jogging)

 

What kind of a car do you drive and where do you go jogging? :huh:

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I think you've overlooked one of the points of this post. It's not just the type of cache, in this case I believe most refer to it as a lame parking lot cache, but it is also the proliferation of these lame parking lot caches. Just having a new attribute isn't necessarily going to change that. "Oh look honey, we've got a new attribute for our caches." I believe that having lists of your favorite caches in your area can be helpful to other geocachers to help avoid the lame parking lot caches and look for the more interesting ones, although that's no guarantee that you'll necessarily like the caches on someone elses favorites list, but if you do, hey, you can try them all.

 

I've read where some cachers have mentioned that the caches in their area were pretty lame but once they formed a local geocaching club and started discussing what made a good cache the cache hides in that area started to improve and become more interesting and fun.

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It's amazing that you think you are so psychic that you know all the research I've done and how I've formed my opinion. I've talked to tons cachers outside of the forums. Give me freaking a break! :huh: Rather than argue let's conduct a poll with these three questions:

 

Which do you prefer?

a) Caches that are hidden in interesting places

b.) Caches hidden in parking lots

c) Any cache is fine with me

 

Are numbers important to you?

a) Yes

b.) No

c) Sort of

 

How long have you been caching?

a) Less than one year

b.) 1-3 years

c) More than 3 years

As far as I can tell, you've done no real research at all. Also, I'm not sure what that poll would tell you even if you were able to get a response from all geocachers. (My answers are C,B,C, by the way.)

My answers are C,C,C, and Agency B)

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It's amazing that you think you are so psychic that you know all the research I've done and how I've formed my opinion. I've talked to tons cachers outside of the forums. Give me freaking a break! :huh: Rather than argue let's conduct a poll with these three questions:

 

Which do you prefer?

a) Caches that are hidden in interesting places

b.) Caches hidden in parking lots

c) Any cache is fine with me

 

Are numbers important to you?

a) Yes

b.) No

c) Sort of

 

How long have you been caching?

a) Less than one year

b.) 1-3 years

c) More than 3 years

As far as I can tell, you've done no real research at all. Also, I'm not sure what that poll would tell you even if you were able to get a response from all geocachers. (My answers are C,B,C, by the way.)

Please don't knock my experience and observations. I actually care a lot of the game so my intentions are altuistic. I know many people that like any cache and I also know many of people that don't. Actually many of these people have quit caching. The point is that they both have rights and that neither should infringe on the other. So until there is a easy way for the people that don't like parking lot caches to weed those out then those people are being infringed on because they are the ones that have to spend all the time reading and researching and filtering caches because others refuse to hide caches in interesting locations or in interesting ways. So we are simply asking for a way to quickly pan for the gold so we don't have to waste our time in front of a PC.By the way I am an ABC. I used to be a CBC but got burned out on microspew several months ago.
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As a caching newbie, I an definitely partial to the "ammo can in the wild" than the "urban micro on a lightpost." BUT if the micro is a clever hide or in a neat location, I don't mind them at all. What I do hate is the "micro in the wild." If you choose a location where cache size does not matter, why place a film canister in a knot hole of a tree when you could have hidden a container the size of a Geo Metro and still has the same amount of stealth?

 

MHO...

 

Scoobybri

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Please don't knock my experience and observations. I actually care a lot of the game so my intentions are altuistic. I know many people that like any cache and I also know many of people that don't. Actually many of these people have quit caching. The point is that they both have rights and that neither should infringe on the other. So until there is a easy way for the people that don't like parking lot caches to weed those out then those people are being infringed on because they are the ones that have to spend all the time reading and researching and filtering caches because others refuse to hide caches in interesting locations or in interesting ways. So we are simply asking for a way to quickly pan for the gold so we don't have to waste our time in front of a PC.By the way I am an ABC. I used to be a CBC but got burned out on microspew several months ago.
No one knocked your experience. However, you suggested that you had done 'research' but didn't offer any proof of it. You also were the one to bring experience into the issue when you posted this pearl:
... I really see a clear divide between the people that enjoy finding microspew and us. I also think that the more you cache the more likely you are to get bored with microspew. :huh:
You attempted to make it appear that experienced cachers are more likely to agree with you. This is clearly not true.

 

Finally, I'm not buying that any of your 'rights' are being 'infringed' because you have to put a little work in to find caches that knock your socks off. After all, you are the one who is being selective. Why shouldn't you have to work a bit harder to satisfy your discriminating tastes.

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As a caching newbie, I an definitely partial to the "ammo can in the wild" than the "urban micro on a lightpost." BUT if the micro is a clever hide or in a neat location, I don't mind them at all. What I do hate is the "micro in the wild." If you choose a location where cache size does not matter, why place a film canister in a knot hole of a tree when you could have hidden a container the size of a Geo Metro and still has the same amount of stealth?
Good golly, you have some big knot holes in your neck of the woods. :huh:
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... I really see a clear divide between the people that enjoy finding microspew and us. I also think that the more you cache the more likely you are to get bored with microspew. :huh:
You attempted to make it appear that experienced cachers are more likely to agree with you. This is clearly not true.
That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.

 

Anyhow, why are you arguing against us having a parking lot attribute to help us out? There is no sweat off your back.....

Edited by TrailGators
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I'm a newbie cacher and I see how for those of you who have 1,000 or 10,000 finds those light poles can get boring. However, people are introduced to geo-caching on a daily basis and finding that first lightpole cache makes you go "ohhhhhh....!" B)

 

Of course, if out of your first 100 finds you notice 70 are these kinds that'd be a little problem LOL (or probably a bad sign B) or a sign that you're lazy and unwilling to actually go hike?)

 

Anyway, someone brought up a very good point "If you're tired of those boring caches why not make your own?"

 

For example, I live in Southern California, which means houses up and down the road with the occasional park. Luckily for me they've kept some trails and open areas available to the public. When I wanted to launch my first TB (which is still the only one I got :huh: ) I noticed a HUGE lack of medium/large caches around here so the family and I got together and we've started our own series. We have yet to place a micro cache, the smallest we've placed I think is a plastic container about the size of those used in labs to collect urine samples (hehe, don't panic, is not one of those, just about that size)

 

So if you don't like those itty bitty tiny micros that you can barely write on, why not try to find a place near your house where you can place one to your liking? We tried to think of the kind we'd like to find and that's what we made ours be and so far the few people that've found them have liked them. For example: My sister-in-law lives in Maryland, and her family put together a cache inside a "birdhouse" that they built, so they hung it on a tree in their property, made for a fun family project and spiced up the search for the cachers in the area. So just use your imagination.

 

I dunno, that's just my opinion tho

Edited by Colombian Princess
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I'm a newbie cacher and I see how for those of you who have 1,000 or 10,000 finds those light poles can get boring. However, people are introduced to geo-caching on a daily basis and finding that first lightpole cache makes you go "ohhhhhh....!" B)

 

Of course, if out of your first 100 finds you notice 70 are these kinds that'd be a little problem LOL (or probably a bad sign B) or a sign that you're lazy and unwilling to actually go hike?)

 

Anyway, someone brought up a very good point "If you're tired of those boring caches why not make your own?"

 

For example, I live in Southern California, which means houses up and down the road with the occasional park. Luckily for me they've kept some trails and open areas available to the public. When I wanted to launch my first TB (which is still the only one I got :huh: ) I noticed a HUGE lack of medium/large caches around here so the family and I got together and we've started our own series. We have yet to place a micro cache, the smallest we've placed I think is a plastic container about the size of those used in labs to collect urine samples (hehe, don't panic, is not one of those, just about that size)

 

So if you don't like those itty bitty tiny micros that you can barely write on, why not try to find a place near your house where you can place one to your liking? We tried to think of the kind we'd like to find and that's what we made ours be and so far the few people that've found them have liked them. For example: My sister-in-law lives in Maryland, and her family put together a cache inside a "birdhouse" that they built, so they hung it on a tree in their property, made for a fun family project and spiced up the search for the cachers in the area. So just use your imagination.

 

I dunno, that's just my opinion tho

I would enjoy those kinds of micros you are talking about! B) Unfortunately, those types of micros would get ignored with our ignore all caches with less than 2/2 filter. That is exactly why we want a way to ignore lightposts at Home Depot or caches near dumpsters behind stripmalls and not ignore the creative caches you brought up! B) Edited by TrailGators
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...That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.

 

Anyhow, why are you arguing against us having a parking lot attribute to help us out? There is no sweat off your back.....

 

Personally I find homeless camps fascinating. I find industrial slag zones interesting. I like things off the beaten path that I've driven by 2000 times and never noticed. Insofar as locations go I've seen walmarts and I've seen woods. They are the same. Water is always interesting but a cache under a log in the woods is as uninteresting as one in the wallyworld parking lot. Bigger containers I like over smaller since looking at the swag is allways a bonus. I don't like historical signs, I'd rather be in the historical spot even if it's a parking lot. I like random suprise discoveries. Like a spot where when you speak you hear your voice amplified because of how the buildings are laid out. Sometimes I like to wonder why someone put a cache there of all places instead of 50 over. I like visiting the same spot twice to see what the new cache owner did differently than the person who used to have a cache there. I like vacant lots because they were important to me when I was a kid and I find it interesting to see what kids today are doing in them. I actually like vacant lots more than plain old parks. Not all parks are interesting. It takes more than a swingset and grass to make a park stand out. After a string of skunks a lame and easy cache is the right way to finish the day even if it is a micro. Walmart micro's are great to end or start on to buy cache food and get a jump on the cache day. One mans trash cache is another's treasure cache. Mostly I just don't like micro caches because they are too small for swag. Almost always you could swap a Decon container for the Micro and have swag.

 

Most people would think the parking lot attribute would mean there is parking available for your rig. I have a cache where there is no place to park. You have to figure that out, then hike in a long ways even though the cache is actually a short distance from the road. What I think Kit fox is after is the "Micro Spew" attribute.

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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is. The beauty of this game is that nobody forces you to go look for any cache that you don't want to. If you do a bit (just a tiny bit) of research beforehand, you can pretty much avoid the ones that you won't like.
Anyhow, why are you arguing against us having a parking lot attribute to help us out? There is no sweat off your back.....
Well, that's not the topic of this thread. You will note that there's a perfectly good thread in the gc.com section of the forums regarding attributes. Edited by sbell111
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Personally I find homeless camps fascinating. I find industrial slag zones interesting. I like things off the beaten path that I've driven by 2000 times and never noticed. Insofar as locations go I've seen walmarts and I've seen woods. ...
Perhaps you'll change you mind once you get a little more experienced. :D
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What I think Kit fox is after is the "Micro Spew" attribute.
That's CERTAINLY what *I'M* after! (Act surprised.)
Me too! :D But I can't say that without some people getting unglued. We have to be "politically correct." :D
It's what Brian is after, also. The problem is that you can't define lame for everybody and I guarantee that no one would use the icon, even if you did.
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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is.
No it wasn't. I want you to go lift up every lamp post cover in your town. Let me know if this ever gets boring?
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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is.
No it wasn't. I want you to go lift up every lamp post cover in your town. Let me know if this ever gets boring?

Ummm, you misread my post. Let me help you:

Sure it is human nature to...

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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is.
No it wasn't. I want you to go lift up every lamp post cover in your town. Let me know if this ever gets boring?

you misread my post. Sure it is human nature to [become bored]

So you do agree that it is haman nature to become bored. Now would you agree that the majority of people will eventually become bored with lifting almost every lamp post cover up in the town that they live in? I agree will agree before to add it to your response AGAIN, that when people hit that point they can ignore those caches by filttering out all caches less than 2/2. Edited by TrailGators
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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is.
No it wasn't. I want you to go lift up every lamp post cover in your town. Let me know if this ever gets boring?

Why would you want to lift up every lamp post cover any more than you would want to look under every pile of rocks? I look under the lamp posts that have caches hidden in them and I look in the piles of rocks that have caches hidden in them. Sometimes I get bored because it's the same thing I've seen 100 times. Sometimes I think - it's cool that this was hidden here (more often when I'm looking in the pile of rocks off the trail in the mountains, but often enough when I'm looking under the lamppost). When I get really bored with urban hides, I go hiking. It's easy enough to find hiking caches (there's even a significant hike attribute). If someone tells me about a neat urban cache, I'll put it on a list of caches I want to find. If I see one hidden by a hider with a reputation for good hides, I'll put it on a list of caches I want to find. And sometimes I'll go urban caching with a group of cachers that are just interested in the numbers - it's fun to do this once and a while although it's not something I do everyday. I think what sbell is saying it that given the kinds of caches you and Kit Fox say you like to find, it's not hard to have plenty of caches to keep busy using the techniques you are already using. Spending a lot of time on trying for a finer filter that probably won't eliminate everything you don't like doing anyway is not the best use of your time or TPTB's time. Jeremy has announced that he is working on some kind of affinity recommendation system (people who liked this cache also liked...) and of some way to recognize cache hiders that have exceptional hides. These ideas are likely to help you more than a parking lot cache attribute.

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So you do agree that it is haman nature to become bored. Now would you agree that the majority of people will eventually become bored with lifting almost every lamp post cover up in the town that they live in?
Please show me a town that has caches below 'almost every lamp post cover'. While your at it, show me the census that proves that you are in the majority of any geocaching-related issue.
I agree will agree before to add it to your response AGAIN, that when people hit that point they can ignore those caches by filttering out all caches less than 2/2.
I can't figure what this sentence is trying to say. Please help.
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That is not even close to what my point was. My point was that the more time you spend finding uninteresting caches the more likely that you would become bored with doing that. It is human nature to get bored with things after time.
Sure it is.
No it wasn't. I want you to go lift up every lamp post cover in your town. Let me know if this ever gets boring?

Why would you want to lift up every lamp post cover any more than you would want to look under every pile of rocks? I look under the lamp posts that have caches hidden in them and I look in the piles of rocks that have caches hidden in them. Sometimes I get bored because it's the same thing I've seen 100 times.
There is one big difference between most piles of sticks/rocks and most lamp posts....Look around the cache area! :D I know that some of you are arguing that Wal-Mart parking lots are just as interesting as trails in parks but I totally disagree. We have some awesome parks/trails around here. I used to go urban caching after hiking because my legs were tired. Now I go home.

 

Sometimes I think - it's cool that this was hidden here (more often when I'm looking in the pile of rocks off the trail in the mountains, but often enough when I'm looking under the lamppost). When I get really bored with urban hides, I go hiking. It's easy enough to find hiking caches (there's even a significant hike attribute). If someone tells me about a neat urban cache, I'll put it on a list of caches I want to find. If I see one hidden by a hider with a reputation for good hides, I'll put it on a list of caches I want to find. And sometimes I'll go urban caching with a group of cachers that are just interested in the numbers - it's fun to do this once and a while although it's not something I do everyday. I think what sbell is saying it that given the kinds of caches you and Kit Fox say you like to find, it's not hard to have plenty of caches to keep busy using the techniques you are already using. Spending a lot of time on trying for a finer filter that probably won't eliminate everything you don't like doing anyway is not the best use of your time or TPTB's time. Jeremy has announced that he is working on some kind of affinity recommendation system (people who liked this cache also liked...) and of some way to recognize cache hiders that have exceptional hides. These ideas are likely to help you more than a parking lot cache attribute.
I do the same thing. It's all I can do. Unfortunately, I can't cache with some of my caching buddies anymore because they still like parking lot caches and I don't. So I am now caching with new caching buddies that have become very bored with the typical urban cache. So all do now is hike or find an occassional recommended urban. I can't wait for Jeremy's idea to happen! :D
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I think if they spun off Microcaches (& smaller) as their own type it would make the most people the happiest with the least amount of pain.

 

With my family they don't ask me where the caches are so much as if they are all micro's.

 

Maybe we could stick them all on Waymarking as a catagory.

Edited by Renegade Knight
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I think if they spun off Microcaches (& smaller) as their own type it would make the most people the happiest with the least amount of pain.

 

With my family they don't ask me where the caches are so much as if they are all micro's.

 

Maybe we could stick them all on Waymarking as a catagory.

:D RK, do you have your flameproof suit on? I think I see Sbell, KBI and The Alabama Rambler coming with their flamethrowers.... :D When I joked about having micro.com or smiley.com they were all over me! :D
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I know people that geocache on one trail, the same trail, all the time. :D They have a couple of geocaches that they hide...and let their buddies find, and then pick them up and archive them. :D Their buddies do the same thing for them. :D

 

This sounds very boring to me.

They hike up the same trail all the time....boring.

 

I'd much rather find lampost hides. :D But, they are NOT my favorite type of hide. I much prefer magnetic key holders on benches, and my favorite type is magnetic key holders on bus stops. :D

 

So keep hiding them for me.

 

Always remember that the opinions posted on the forums are a microscopic minority, and NOT the opinion of the majority of geocachers. The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there.

The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D

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I think if they spun off Microcaches (& smaller) as their own type it would make the most people the happiest with the least amount of pain.

 

With my family they don't ask me where the caches are so much as if they are all micro's.

 

Maybe we could stick them all on Waymarking as a catagory.

:D RK, do you have your flameproof suit on? I think I see Sbell, KBI and The Alabama Rambler coming with their flamethrowers.... :D When I joked about having micro.com or smiley.com they were all over me! :D
I think RK was joking about sending micros to WM.com.

 

I doubt that TPTB would ever be interested in making micros their own category. Threads requesting this are created pretty frequently. They all go the same way, with posters patiently explaining that there is a difference between type and size...

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I know people that geocache on one trail, the same trail, all the time. :D They have a couple of geocaches that they hide...and let their buddies find, and then pick them up and archive them. :D Their buddies do the same thing for them. :D ...
Cachers who do that would likely be in violation of the guidelines. Temporary caches are not allowed.
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The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there. The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D
The higher the difficulty/terrain the less the cache will be found....

- the voice of a microscopic minority responding to another microscopic minority :D

Edited by TrailGators
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The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there. The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D
The higher the difficulty/terrain the less the cache will be found....
While that's true, the people who clearly prefer higher difficulty/terrain caches will do them. The people who don't prefer higher difficulty/terrain caches will not. Therefore, this comparison is useful.
- the voice of a microscopic minority responding to another microscopic minority :D
I don't get it. Was it a personal insult toward Ventura Kids, or are you a voice of the microscopic minority?
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The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there. The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D
The higher the difficulty/terrain the less the cache will be found....
While that's true, the people who clearly prefer higher difficulty/terrain caches will do them. The people who don't prefer higher difficulty/terrain caches will not. Therefore, this comparison is useful.
- the voice of a microscopic minority responding to another microscopic minority :D
I don't get it. Was it a personal insult toward Ventura Kids, or are you a voice of the microscopic minority?

I was joking.....Didn't you notice the little laughing dude? :D

However, I was not joking about the find count vs. terrain. Some of the most found caches are the lamest ones out there. A lot of people who just go from cache to cache don't know a cache is lame until it's too late. Then they simply find it and log it so they can get it off their maps. So I wouldn't use number of finds as a gauge. Also the SD favorites list I compiled is further proof of that. :D

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I know people that geocache on one trail, the same trail, all the time. :D They have a couple of geocaches that they hide...and let their buddies find, and then pick them up and archive them. :D Their buddies do the same thing for them. :D

 

This sounds very boring to me.

They hike up the same trail all the time....boring.

 

I'd much rather find lampost hides. :D But, they are NOT my favorite type of hide. I much prefer magnetic key holders on benches, and my favorite type is magnetic key holders on bus stops. :D

 

So keep hiding them for me.

 

Always remember that the opinions posted on the forums are a microscopic minority, and NOT the opinion of the majority of geocachers. The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there.

The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D

 

Steve,

 

We discussed this at the last geocaching event, when I asked you if you ever got tired of parking lot caches, and lifting lamppost covers.

 

I'm an "outdoorsy" kind of guy who derives great pleasure in hearing the sounds of water flowing, seeing tracks left by wild animals, geological wonders. That is why I hide caches in locations like these.

 

Always remember that the opinions posted on the forums are a microscopic minority, and NOT the opinion of the majority of geocachers. The 'facts' can be seen by the number of finds on each cache out there.

The biggest hitters are the parking lot hides. The smallest number of finds are out in the bushes and up on the trails. :D

 

This is simple to explain the "new numbers game" is the driving force behind "micro spew." The glory and recognition of being in the the "top ten" makes this drive an obsession. I remember when you went to every geocaching event wearing your Ventura Kids, #3 in the world name tag. This was a source of pride with you, and it was awe inspiring to cachers who wanted to be "big name, power cachers" like your self. The only way to maintain this position is by finding the maximum number of caches per caching trip. The easiest, and most effective method to do this is by simply hunting easy caches or "1/1.s"

 

As long as there is this constant drive to have the highest find count, there will be no shortage of demand for caches placed "just because." My high terrain caches get very few visits, in fact my cache Eisen-Faust has one logged find in nearly four months. I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page.

 

In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.

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9 pages, 439 posts, not even CLOSE to agreeing... on anything!

 

I am going caching when my friends get off work, we have 12 caches picked to do tonight, all urban, mostly micros. :D

 

I guarantee I will be having fun, y'all keep posting, you might change someone's mind one day! :D

The world will be covered three feet deep in micros before we all ever agree. :D
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I'd much rather find lampost hides. :D But, they are NOT my favorite type of hide. I much prefer magnetic key holders on benches, and my favorite type is magnetic key holders on bus stops. :D

 

So keep hiding them for me.

I must admit I respect VK for coming in here and admitting that this is his preference, and why. Seriously.

 

I know several other Numbers Ho's who also readily admit what they are (and as I've stated here numerous times, I *was* one until Micro Spew finally broke me); it's a shame that in order to sustain that level of cache-find volume, overall cache quality has had to deteriorate, but it is what it is and there doesn't seem to be any stopping it now.

My high terrain caches get very few visits, in fact my cache Eisen-Faust has one logged find in nearly four months. I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page.

 

In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.

I think that note on the cache page is GREAT. Do you include a similar note on your less-strenuous hides, along the lines of: In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 25 to 50 parking lot micros. It might take you an hour or more to complete this cache hunt, but if you enjoy a relatively flat terrain hike (or "a bit of bushwhacking" or whatever the case may be), it will be worthwhile to you. Might drive some more traffic to your caches, I would think. :D

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Hmm. Maybe I'm asking for it by even bothering to post in this thread but...here it goes:

 

Seems to me this is a pretty heated topic and one cachers are passionate about. It also looks like people like to make it more of an argument than a debate. I'm newer to this sport (yeah I know, some argue it's not a sport...I think that another thread) and I don't profess to have a solution. Just an observation. I recently encounted my first "I hate it." cache. I now (yes, after only one) know what to look for. To me All caches have value. Period. To debate which one we like as cachers is part of the FUN. This IS about FUN right? I know what I don't like in a cache and have been pleasantly surprised by one I expected to be a stinker but just "get it off the list" went to check it out. Personally, it seems that you take the good with the bad. I guess I can help clarify my observation by comparing it to American Football.

 

Not everyone likes the instant replay rules, but we all have to live with them. If they take it away, people will dislike that too. But fans of the sport will still want to watch. So I say, rate things how you want. If you that passionate about things you dislike, start your own group, webpage to label caches your own way, or do things your way. Just don't ask everyone to like it or everyone to join. And just for the record, I think I'll avoid most urban micros, but I'll check a few out from time to time, especially if it looks to be located in a unique spot. Which, with most Google maps should be fairly easy to weed out.

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...I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page.

 

In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.

You weren't a marketing major, were you?
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My high terrain caches get very few visits, in fact my cache Eisen-Faust has one logged find in nearly four months. I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page. In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.
I think that note on the cache page is GREAT. :D
I do too! I love it when people use humor like that! :D
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...I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page.

 

In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.

You weren't a marketing major, were you?

 

Actually it was Criminal Law. :D

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...I deduce that the main reason this cache gets few visits is because of the note that I posted on the cache page.

 

In the time it takes to find this cache, you could easily find 50 to 75 parking lot micros. If you don't like bugs, sweat, body-aches, and real danger, stick to "lamp post" caches.

You weren't a marketing major, were you?

 

Actually it was Criminal Law. :D

The irony of your response, given the similar/related/but different discussion going on in the Pocket Caches thread, is humorous to me. :D

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