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Hike of the Month 2007


TotemLake
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I've been looking over the PNT trail map for the next hike. I'm zeroing in on something in the Olympic Peninsula.

 

Kewl, count me in if you're hiking over here. I just got back from 4 days of backpacking on the Enchanted Valley trail. I saw five of these on my hike:

 

terramamabear.jpg

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

Tides for La Push, Quillayute River starting with June 23, 2007. 
Day		High	  Tide  Height   Sunrise	Moon  Time	  % Moon
	   /Low	  Time	Feet	Sunset					Visible

Sa  23	  Low   2:07 AM	 1.9   5:20 AM	 Set  1:18 AM	  53
23	 High   7:53 AM	 5.0   9:22 PM	Rise  2:52 PM
23	  Low   1:36 PM	 1.8
23	 High   8:20 PM	 7.0

Su  24	  Low   3:10 AM	 1.4   5:20 AM	 Set  1:32 AM	  63
24	 High   9:08 AM	 4.8   9:22 PM	Rise  3:59 PM
24	  Low   2:26 PM	 2.4
24	 High   9:02 PM	 7.2

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

Edited by TotemLake
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I've been looking over the PNT trail map for the next hike. I'm zeroing in on something in the Olympic Peninsula.

 

Kewl, count me in if you're hiking over here. I just got back from 4 days of backpacking on the Enchanted Valley trail. I saw five of these on my hike:

 

terramamabear.jpg

great pics! Get those on long range zoom?

 

I used my zoom but it's not that long of a range, they were looking right at me.

 

I can't go backpacking on the Ozzete Triangle I got my one backpacking trip of the year in. Now all trips will have to revolve around a three year old. Unless I can escape to go up Col. Bob in August of course.

 

I just got home from hiking up and DOWN Mount Rose and I"m in better shape than I thought.. :blink:

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The Ozette hike is a great hike to take for starting backpackers. We did it with 5 1/2 kids in 2001 and they all did great.

Half a kid? Did they hop the trail, or what? :)

 

We did the trip in August, Lil' Lost One wasn't born until December. :)

 

Hiking while 4 months pregnant? Good job! Did you have to carry a pack?

 

I went backpacking when I was 8 weeks along and it ended in near disaster, the baby was fine, she's three now but the coast guard had to come and pluck me off of the high divide!

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The Ozette hike is a great hike to take for starting backpackers. We did it with 5 1/2 kids in 2001 and they all did great.

Half a kid? Did they hop the trail, or what? :)

 

We did the trip in August, Lil' Lost One wasn't born until December. :)

 

Hiking while 4 months pregnant? Good job! Did you have to carry a pack?

 

I went backpacking when I was 8 weeks along and it ended in near disaster, the baby was fine, she's three now but the coast guard had to come and pluck me off of the high divide!

Speaking of coast guard rescues, there were five hikers rescued from a sea cave on Vancouver Island today. Were they cachers?

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

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I just rented a bear canister...

AMERICAN FORK, Utah — An 11-year-old boy was dragged screaming from his family's tent and killed by a black bear during a Father's Day outing in the Utah wilderness.

 

The boy, his mother, stepfather and a 6-year-old brother were sleeping in a large tent Sunday night in American Fork Canyon, about 30 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, when the stepfather heard the boy scream "something's dragging me."

 

The boy and his sleeping bag were gone. The cut in the nylon tent was so clean, his family, who was not identified, first believed the boy had been abducted, U.S Forest Service officers said.

 

Wearing flip-flops and without a flashlight, the stepfather searched frantically for the boy and then drove a mile down a dirt road to a developed campground.

 

"He was pounding on my trailer door. He said somebody cut his tent and took his son," said John Sheely, host of the Timpooneke campground, who alerted authorities by driving down the canyon to a pay phone.

 

The boy's body was found about 400 yards away from the campsite, said Lt. Dennis Harris of the Utah County sheriff's office.

 

Authorities said the bear, as much as 300 pounds, probably was the same one harassing another group of campers in the same spot before dawn Sunday. Kurt Francom said his son, Jake, was kicked in the head through a tent wall.

 

"It could have been my boy," said Francom, a school custodian.

 

Wildlife officers shot a black bear Monday and flew its remains out of the Wasatch Mountains for tests to confirm that it was responsible for the fatal mauling. The officers used 26 dogs to track the bear's scent, shooting and wounding him. The creature wandered around wounded until officers shot and killed him several hours later, said Lt. Scott White of the state wildlife agency.

 

Authorities said the death was Utah's first fatal attack on a human by a black bear. It follows reports of several bear sightings during spring and occurred just hours after other people in the same primitive campsite likely encountered the same animal.

 

"Truly a tragic event," said Jim Karpowitz, director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. "Events of this type are extremely rare in Utah."

 

The attack occurred in American Fork Canyon, a popular camping destination with elevations as high as 11,000 feet.

 

"When it's hot and dry like this, bears are short of food," Karpowitz said.

 

In May, officials reported black bears in Provo Canyon and Park City, including one that ripped through a screen door at a cabin where residents had burned food and opened windows.

 

Officers killed that bear because it showed no fear when biologists tried to scare it away with firecrackers, the wildlife agency said.

 

In July 2006, a black bear bit the arm of a 14-year-old Boy Scout while he slept in a tent, also in Utah County. The female bear returned to the campground and was killed.

 

Black bears, which are found in 27 states, are "generally less aggressive than other bears and don't prey on humans," said Stewart Breck, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Fort Collins, Colo.

 

The typical human-bear conflicts involve bears breaking into homes or cars.

 

"But it's not breaking into a tent and killing," Breck said.

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

 

You've been misled, the hard sided food container rule on the coast is for Racoons.

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I just rented a bear canister...

AMERICAN FORK, Utah — An 11-year-old boy was dragged screaming from his family's tent and killed by a black bear during a Father's Day outing in the Utah wilderness.

 

The boy, his mother, stepfather and a 6-year-old brother were sleeping in a large tent Sunday night in American Fork Canyon, about 30 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, when the stepfather heard the boy scream "something's dragging me."

 

The boy and his sleeping bag were gone. The cut in the nylon tent was so clean, his family, who was not identified, first believed the boy had been abducted, U.S Forest Service officers said.

 

Wearing flip-flops and without a flashlight, the stepfather searched frantically for the boy and then drove a mile down a dirt road to a developed campground.

 

"He was pounding on my trailer door. He said somebody cut his tent and took his son," said John Sheely, host of the Timpooneke campground, who alerted authorities by driving down the canyon to a pay phone.

 

The boy's body was found about 400 yards away from the campsite, said Lt. Dennis Harris of the Utah County sheriff's office.

 

Authorities said the bear, as much as 300 pounds, probably was the same one harassing another group of campers in the same spot before dawn Sunday. Kurt Francom said his son, Jake, was kicked in the head through a tent wall.

 

"It could have been my boy," said Francom, a school custodian.

 

Wildlife officers shot a black bear Monday and flew its remains out of the Wasatch Mountains for tests to confirm that it was responsible for the fatal mauling. The officers used 26 dogs to track the bear's scent, shooting and wounding him. The creature wandered around wounded until officers shot and killed him several hours later, said Lt. Scott White of the state wildlife agency.

 

Authorities said the death was Utah's first fatal attack on a human by a black bear. It follows reports of several bear sightings during spring and occurred just hours after other people in the same primitive campsite likely encountered the same animal.

 

"Truly a tragic event," said Jim Karpowitz, director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. "Events of this type are extremely rare in Utah."

 

The attack occurred in American Fork Canyon, a popular camping destination with elevations as high as 11,000 feet.

 

"When it's hot and dry like this, bears are short of food," Karpowitz said.

 

In May, officials reported black bears in Provo Canyon and Park City, including one that ripped through a screen door at a cabin where residents had burned food and opened windows.

 

Officers killed that bear because it showed no fear when biologists tried to scare it away with firecrackers, the wildlife agency said.

 

In July 2006, a black bear bit the arm of a 14-year-old Boy Scout while he slept in a tent, also in Utah County. The female bear returned to the campground and was killed.

 

Black bears, which are found in 27 states, are "generally less aggressive than other bears and don't prey on humans," said Stewart Breck, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Fort Collins, Colo.

 

The typical human-bear conflicts involve bears breaking into homes or cars.

 

"But it's not breaking into a tent and killing," Breck said.

 

During the five black bear encounters I have had (four on the last hike) the black bears left the area rather quickly when they saw me. One of them ran so fast that all I saw was his fat fuzzy black rump disapearing into the woods. I've pretty much gotten over my fear of a black bear pulling me out of my tent.. and now this happens.. :unsure:

Edited by luckykoi
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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

 

You've been misled, the hard sided food container rule on the coast is for Racoons.

He may have said racoons. I don't remember now.

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During the five black bear encounters I have had (four on the last hike) the black bears left the area rather quickly when they saw me. One of them ran so fast that all I saw was his fat fuzzy black rump disapearing into the woods. I've pretty much gotten over my fear of a black bear pulling me out of my tent.. and now this happens.. :unsure:

This is making assumptions, but I don't think the kid was the original target. Most people are ignorant of proper food handling and he may have had candy in the sleeping bag with him or may have gone to bed smelling like BBQ; which would have broken two rules. No food in the tent and no food in the sleeping bag.

 

This particular black bear has also been identified as harrassing other campers which means IT got over the fear of humans due to sloppy food handling practices in camp.

Edited by TotemLake
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During the five black bear encounters I have had (four on the last hike) the black bears left the area rather quickly when they saw me. One of them ran so fast that all I saw was his fat fuzzy black rump disapearing into the woods. I've pretty much gotten over my fear of a black bear pulling me out of my tent.. and now this happens.. :unsure:

This is making assumptions, but I don't think the kid was the original target. Most people are ignorant of proper food handling and he may have had candy in the sleeping bag with him or may have gone to bed smelling like BBQ; which would have broken two rules. No food in the tent and no food in the sleeping bag.

 

This particular black bear has also been identified as harrassing other campers which means IT got over the fear of humans due to sloppy food handling practices in camp.

From my limited reading on bear encounters, it seems one of the biggest dangers, to humans and bears, is when bears become accustomed to humans. There’s a reason for those “Don’t Feed the Bears” signs. This incident occurred at a large campground area where bears may have associated humans (and their garbage) with easily available food. In the wild, where bears don’t often come face-to-face with us, they usually run when they see us.

 

The people who ignore the signs and the advice of the rangers are the ones who put us all in danger. It might be entertaining to toss your sandwich at a bear, but when it’s really hungry, it’s going to come looking for you or me.

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Encounters of the Wild Kind

 

By Seabury Blair Jr.

For the Kitsap Sun

Monday, June 18, 2007

 

Earlier this month, several hikers on their way to Olympic Hot Springs were delayed when a cougar took a nap on a footbridge, blocking their path.

 

Hikers on both sides of the bridge over Boulder Creek in Olympic National Park waited for about 45 minutes, until the cougar woke up and sauntered into the forest. One hiker took a photo of the big cat and the picture is on display at the park's Wilderness Information Center in Port Angeles.

 

Encounters with wildlife in Olympic National Park and Forest are common enough that you'll see trailhead warnings and read cautionary advice in newsletters and pamphlets. Most hiking guidebooks offer introductory information about wildlife encounters.

 

Although getting up close and personal with an Olympic cougar or black bear may be unsettling — especially to an inexperienced hiker — they are rarely threatening. Stephen Herrero, the author of Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance, has written that black bears are seldom aggressive toward humans and that attacks are virtually nonexistent.

 

And while the cougar is the only animal in the Olympics that may regard humans as prey, attacks on humans are rare indeed. Jo Deurbrouck and Dean Miller, who wrote Cat Attacks: True Stories and Hard Lessons from Cougar Country, noted eight cougar attacks in Washington in the previous decade — including one in the Olympics.

 

Still, the rare attacks garner sensational publicity, perhaps to the detriment of wildlife. And when there are no attacks, historic encounters are recalled, as in the August 2007 issue of Backpacker Magazine, where the killings of two women by grizzlies 40 years ago is recounted.

 

Rather than frightening, tales by local hikers of black bear or cougar encounters are sometimes amusing. South Kitsap backpacker Joyce Kimmel recalls an early hike with local hikers Doug Savage and Joe Weigel to High Divide in Olympic National Park.

 

They camped near an Ohio couple whose shouts of "Shoo!" and "Go away," woke them that night. The noise was enough to frighten away whatever was outside the tent that night — or so they thought.

 

When Savage emerged from his tent the next morning, he spotted the black bear in a tree, directly above the Ohio couple's tent. The couple had left on a day hike, apparently without noticing the bear, which stayed in the tree throughout the day.

 

Kimmel was hiking away from camp, but Weigel reported that the bear heeded the call of nature while still in the tree, bombing the tent below. The three Kitsap hikers broke camp before the Ohio couple returned to what must have been a rather messy tent.

 

Now, that kind of wildlife encounter is probably as rare as a real black bear attack.

 

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2007/jun/18/...ind/?printer=1/ for the rest of the story..

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Encounters of the Wild Kind

 

By Seabury Blair Jr.

For the Kitsap Sun

Monday, June 18, 2007

 

Earlier this month, several hikers on their way to Olympic Hot Springs were delayed when a cougar took a nap on a footbridge, blocking their path.

 

Hikers on both sides of the bridge over Boulder Creek in Olympic National Park waited for about 45 minutes, until the cougar woke up and sauntered into the forest. One hiker took a photo of the big cat and the picture is on display at the park's Wilderness Information Center in Port Angeles.

 

Encounters with wildlife in Olympic National Park and Forest are common enough that you'll see trailhead warnings and read cautionary advice in newsletters and pamphlets. Most hiking guidebooks offer introductory information about wildlife encounters.

 

Although getting up close and personal with an Olympic cougar or black bear may be unsettling — especially to an inexperienced hiker — they are rarely threatening. Stephen Herrero, the author of Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance, has written that black bears are seldom aggressive toward humans and that attacks are virtually nonexistent.

 

And while the cougar is the only animal in the Olympics that may regard humans as prey, attacks on humans are rare indeed. Jo Deurbrouck and Dean Miller, who wrote Cat Attacks: True Stories and Hard Lessons from Cougar Country, noted eight cougar attacks in Washington in the previous decade — including one in the Olympics.

 

Still, the rare attacks garner sensational publicity, perhaps to the detriment of wildlife. And when there are no attacks, historic encounters are recalled, as in the August 2007 issue of Backpacker Magazine, where the killings of two women by grizzlies 40 years ago is recounted.

 

Rather than frightening, tales by local hikers of black bear or cougar encounters are sometimes amusing. South Kitsap backpacker Joyce Kimmel recalls an early hike with local hikers Doug Savage and Joe Weigel to High Divide in Olympic National Park.

 

They camped near an Ohio couple whose shouts of "Shoo!" and "Go away," woke them that night. The noise was enough to frighten away whatever was outside the tent that night — or so they thought.

 

When Savage emerged from his tent the next morning, he spotted the black bear in a tree, directly above the Ohio couple's tent. The couple had left on a day hike, apparently without noticing the bear, which stayed in the tree throughout the day.

 

Kimmel was hiking away from camp, but Weigel reported that the bear heeded the call of nature while still in the tree, bombing the tent below. The three Kitsap hikers broke camp before the Ohio couple returned to what must have been a rather messy tent.

 

Now, that kind of wildlife encounter is probably as rare as a real black bear attack.

 

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2007/jun/18/...ind/?printer=1/ for the rest of the story..

:D The bear was quoted as exclaiming "Shoo? I thought he said Poo!" :unsure:

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

Ok, the permit cost me $5, plus $2 per head over 16. I have a permit for 10 and 3 are for sure used. Because I'm on this regardless of participation, my seat will be $7, so it will only be $2 per person to join in for an overnight. Please don't sit on the fence until the last possible moment. I'm not paying for extra seats if they're not going to be used. Anybody not noted by Thursday as part of the group will not be counted afterwards as I have to call Friday with the number in the group.

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

Ok, the permit cost me $5, plus $2 per head over 16. I have a permit for 10 and 3 are for sure used. Because I'm on this regardless of participation, my seat will be $7, so it will only be $2 per person to join in for an overnight. Please don't sit on the fence until the last possible moment. I'm not paying for extra seats if they're not going to be used. Anybody not noted by Thursday as part of the group will not be counted afterwards as I have to call Friday with the number in the group.

 

I would love to come but I have a three-year-old. What is needed is someone who is training to climb a mountain to carry her for me. She only weighs 35 pounds.

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A new hike has finally been planned for 6/23 and bookmarked. This is a series of virtual caches that will take you through lowland rainforest to the beach with visits to abandoned homesteads and an indian village. Those daring enough will go after the Steam Donkey cache but timing has to be at lowtide.

 

I plan on overnighting the weekend. I'll need a headcount of those planning on overnighting by the 21st so i can have the proper permit ready.

I have secured a camping permit for 10 and can increase that to 12. If we have more than that, then there will be a requirement of splitting up and camping a mile apart. There are fire pits we can use and 2 pit toilets the rangers ask we take advantage of.

 

We are remnded this is bear country and as such, they require bear canisters for anything of a food nature or that has an odor that might attract the bears.

 

Anybody planning on overnighting please pipe up. I have Criminal and his son and a lurker making a subtotal of 4 so far.

Ok, the permit cost me $5, plus $2 per head over 16. I have a permit for 10 and 3 are for sure used. Because I'm on this regardless of participation, my seat will be $7, so it will only be $2 per person to join in for an overnight. Please don't sit on the fence until the last possible moment. I'm not paying for extra seats if they're not going to be used. Anybody not noted by Thursday as part of the group will not be counted afterwards as I have to call Friday with the number in the group.

We'll be three.

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Hey TL and Crim

 

Make sure you have your Ham radios on and tuned to the local repeater, its Field day this weekend and there will probibly be a lot of chatter.

 

I will be up on the plateau with my father helping to run the Issaquah Amature Radio Club field station. Otherwise I would go on the hike with you.

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Hey TL and Crim

 

Make sure you have your Ham radios on and tuned to the local repeater...

Do you have the numbers that go along with that?

 

I have the mobile in the car for the drive up and the HH for the hike, although I’ll probably leave that one off until we make camp.

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Hey TL and Crim

 

Make sure you have your Ham radios on and tuned to the local repeater...

Do you have the numbers that go along with that?

 

I have the mobile in the car for the drive up and the HH for the hike, although I’ll probably leave that one off until we make camp.

Not sure what you are using but this repeater in Forks was the closest I could find. Freq. 147.280 with an imput of 147.880 and a PL tone of 127.3

 

http://www.artscipub.com/repeaters/comment...rks,-Washington

 

Here is a link that I use to find repeaters.

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It is with huge disappointment the overnight is being cancelled. After all the setup, I looked at the tide tables and the timing is wrong for a 1 night stay.

 

Were any lurkers going to be dayhikers? If so, I'll continue to go for a dayhike. If not, I'll come up with something different.

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It is with huge disappointment the overnight is being cancelled. After all the setup, I looked at the tide tables and the timing is wrong for a 1 night stay.

 

I changed my mind. I'm going. Any dayhikers can look for me at Cape Alava. I probably won't be going after the Steam Donkey as planned, but I'll be enjoying the time out. I almost forgot, it isn't the cache I'm going for but the adventure. :P

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It is with huge disappointment the overnight is being cancelled. After all the setup, I looked at the tide tables and the timing is wrong for a 1 night stay.

 

I changed my mind. I'm going. Any dayhikers can look for me at Cape Alava. I probably won't be going after the Steam Donkey as planned, but I'll be enjoying the time out. I almost forgot, it isn't the cache I'm going for but the adventure. :P

 

Good for you..

 

If only they allowed jogging strollers on that board walk I would go too.

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New hike schedule for the 28th up around Hwy 20. Details to follow soon. I realize there are a lot of events going on, but that's the way of it with this kind of season. :laughing:

 

If I didn't know better, I'da thunk you were planning all of these for the weekends I'm NOT free.

 

:laughing:

 

 

michelle

:laughing:<_< Not on purpose!

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New hike schedule for the 28th up around Hwy 20. Details to follow soon. I realize there are a lot of events going on, but that's the way of it with this kind of season. :D

 

If I didn't know better, I'da thunk you were planning all of these for the weekends I'm NOT free.

 

:D

 

michelle

Ditto. Everyone he's planned this year has been on a day I'm otherwise engaged. Ah, we are all so lucky to have such busy social lives.... :P

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Ok... I'm callling this hike Out of the Box hike of the month. Instead of looking for a cache, the goal is to hide a cache. I have a spot picked for a hopefully great viewpoint.

 

Trailhead coordinates are

N48° 40.401'

W121° 36.931'

 

After hiding the cache, I'm planning on a small stop to try my hand at fishing before returning. According to this year's stats, 19,300 trout were seeded in both of Watson lakes. Fresh water permit is required.

 

Criminal is planning on an overnight.

 

For those who must have at least a cache find on a hike, there is GC67EE, Baker Lake Trail Cache.

 

NW Forest Service pass is required.

 

Trailhead: From I-5 go east on Hwy 20 to the Baker Lake turnoff and go left. Follow the Baker Lake road for 14 miles and turn right on Forest Service Rd 1106. This will take you past the Kulma Kulshan Campground. Follow the signs to the Baker dam and drive over the one lane road on top of the dam. This puts you on Forest Road 1107. The trailhead is about 10 miles up this gravel road. Forest Service Pass is required to park at the trailhead.

 

Trailhead meet time will be 9AM, Saturday, July 28.

Edited by TotemLake
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