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Caching on Kintyre


BWBlackett
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I've been planning next year's caching trips and we will be visiting family near Campeltown on Kintyre at Easter. Looking at the Geocache map there is only 1 cache hidden on the whole peninsula.

 

Are there any cachers living in this area?

 

I'm willing to place a couple of caches but we only visit 1-2 a year so maintenance may be difficult.

 

Brian

(AKA The Jones')

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Looks like the owners of the 2000 Rocks cache are not validated members. <_< Reading some of the logs, it appears that the cache is in need of some maintenance itself.

 

You could always try and talk your relatives into trying geocaching and setting some caches for you <_<:(

 

Edit:-

There are a few caches around Lochgilphead that you would pass near to.

Edited by Nediam
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As the cache you are setting needs to be "maintained" in a reasonable time, the person/s doing the maintenance need to be reasonably close, to do so.

 

I don't think it means thay HAVE to be cachers...

Relatives who are prepared to do the maintenance should be OK?

(So long as they know where the cache is!)

 

You don't need a GPSr if you have been shown that the cache is "behind this rock just here."

 

G

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Any cache placed over 50 miles form the placers home location, has to have a maintenance plan. This can be:

 

evidence of regular visits to the area for work reasons, a holiday home, visits to family [1-2 visits a year is not sufficient]

 

Someone local to cover the maintenance of the cache. Preferably another Geocacher, but a family member is acceptable, as long as they know the physical location of the container(s), and understand exactly what a maintenance visit entails [ie: check the the container is still in it's location, that it's not damp or wet. That the log book is still present and has room for logs, and that there is no contraband in the cache]

 

Information about either of the above, posted to a cache submitted for publication outside the 50 mile limit, posted as a reviewer note speeds up publication. As the reviewer looking at the cache will not have to place the cache on hold whilst the information is provided.

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Looks like the owners of the 2000 Rocks cache are not validated members. <_< Reading some of the logs, it appears that the cache is in need of some maintenance itself.

As the author of one of those logs I can agree with that statement but would like to add that the walk is well worth it.

 

The cache is still there and just needs a little drying out and a few items added to top it up and make it good again.

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I'd thought about putting some down at Campbeltown direction when i used to do work there, but alas i do no more. :) It would be good to get one @ the ROC post at Caradale...!!!

 

There are plenty of caches in Mid Argyll, especially around the Craignish Area.

 

I know a couple of farmers in Carradale so I'll ask around to see whose land its on.

 

Dave

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I'd thought about putting some down at Campbeltown direction when i used to do work there, but alas i do no more. :) It would be good to get one @ the ROC post at Caradale...!!!

 

There are plenty of caches in Mid Argyll, especially around the Craignish Area.

 

I know a couple of farmers in Carradale so I'll ask around to see whose land its on.

 

Dave

 

Its just next to the golf course apparently... here's the link.

 

http://www.subbrit.org.uk/cgi-bin/webdata_...gifunction=form

 

Hopefully see you at the Lunga Cache Bashe in February.

 

Aye,

 

Ken.

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Looks like the owners of the 2000 Rocks cache are not validated members. :rolleyes: Reading some of the logs, it appears that the cache is in need of some maintenance itself.

As of January I'm going to be based on the Isle of Arran so the above cache is one of the first I plan to visit as during the winter months its only a ferry ride away from Lochranza. I'd been looking at the Kintyre Peninsula as it seems to have lots of possibilities (as does the island of Sanda) but you will just have to wait and see, as for Arran, well as I've already found half the caches on an afternoon without transport I think that I'll have to be putting my efforts into cache setting rather than finding untill I save up the pennies to afford a long weekend on the Isle of Bute. :cool:

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As of January I'm going to be based on the Isle of Arran so the above cache is one of the first I plan to visit as during the winter months its only a ferry ride away from Lochranza. I'd been looking at the Kintyre Peninsula as it seems to have lots of possibilities (as does the island of Sanda) but you will just have to wait and see, as for Arran, well as I've already found half the caches on an afternoon without transport I think that I'll have to be putting my efforts into cache setting rather than finding untill I save up the pennies to afford a long weekend on the Isle of Bute. <_<

 

Lucky you , Arran is gorgeous and I'm sure you'll want to stay forever.....If you look at the finders of the caches on Arran,(and some of the placers) a pattern emerges .....by and large they are cachers on holiday....

I know you can access most of the caches from the bus , though this might require quite a bit of "hanging around" but the main reason Arran isn't well visited is the cost of taking your car on the ferry...last time I was there ...about 3 years ago it was £57 for car + driver....(currently just over £50 but the summer prices are steeper)

 

Similarly with Kintyre, a cache on Kintyre shows as 32 miles from me ....this is actually a drive of over 110 miles....and yes the cache density is proportional to the number of cachers.( i.e.....Team Balibeg.... who have 60 miles of peninsular to themselves :ph34r: )

 

Ps take plenty of Advantix for the dog, Arran does have a large deer population, and unless treated, dogs will be infested with Ticks......

oh ....and don't drink too much "Arran Blonde"

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... Arran is gorgeous and I'm sure you'll want to stay forever.....If you look at the finders of the caches on Arran,(and some of the placers) a pattern emerges .....by and large they are cachers on holiday....

I know you can access most of the caches from the bus , though this might require quite a bit of "hanging around" but the main reason Arran isn't well visited is the cost of taking your car on the ferry...last time I was there ...about 3 years ago it was £57 for car + driver....(currently just over £50 but the summer prices are steeper)

 

Similarly with Kintyre, a cache on Kintyre shows as 32 miles from me ....this is actually a drive of over 110 miles....and yes the cache density is proportional to the number of cachers.( i.e.....Team Balibeg.... who have 60 miles of peninsular to themselves :( )

 

Ps take plenty of Advantix for the dog, Arran does have a large deer population, and unless treated, dogs will be infested with Ticks......

oh ....and don't drink too much "Arran Blonde"

FlyFishermanbob raises an interesting point, how many caches do you need to have before people will go and visit an area. I have ruminated a little previously on the subject of cache lift off and how many caches need to be placed in a concentrated to jump start caching activity. If you consider the Isle of Bute there are around 25 caches ranging from cache & dash trads to more complex series. What do people think would be needed to attract folks to Kintyre or Arran.

 

It looks like most folks who go to Bute expect to visit around a dozen caches, and certainly I can remember being advised that Norfolk needed needed some cache clusters so that it would be possible to find 15 to 20 caches in one outing before we would get more out of county visitors.

 

So short of tempting the Perth Pathfinders, Team Clova or snaik to move west what mix of cache types and number of caches would temp folks to spend £50 on a day trip to a hebridean island/peninsula?

 

Oh and I've already made a start of the Arran Ales at the Catacol Bay Hotel :D

Edited by Jango & Boba Fett
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... Arran is gorgeous and I'm sure you'll want to stay forever.....If you look at the finders of the caches on Arran,(and some of the placers) a pattern emerges .....by and large they are cachers on holiday....

I know you can access most of the caches from the bus , though this might require quite a bit of "hanging around" but the main reason Arran isn't well visited is the cost of taking your car on the ferry...last time I was there ...about 3 years ago it was £57 for car + driver....(currently just over £50 but the summer prices are steeper)

 

Similarly with Kintyre, a cache on Kintyre shows as 32 miles from me ....this is actually a drive of over 110 miles....and yes the cache density is proportional to the number of cachers.( i.e.....Team Balibeg.... who have 60 miles of peninsular to themselves :( )

 

Ps take plenty of Advantix for the dog, Arran does have a large deer population, and unless treated, dogs will be infested with Ticks......

oh ....and don't drink too much "Arran Blonde"

FlyFishermanbob raises an interesting point, how many caches do you need to have before people will go and visit an area. I have ruminated a little previously on the subject of cache lift off and how many caches need to be placed in a concentrated to jump start caching activity. If you consider the Isle of Bute there are around 25 caches ranging from cache & dash trads to more complex series. What do people think would be needed to attract folks to Kintyre or Arran.

 

It looks like most folks who go to Bute expect to visit around a dozen caches, and certainly I can remember being advised that Norfolk needed needed some cache clusters so that it would be possible to find 15 to 20 caches in one outing before we would get more out of county visitors.

 

So short of tempting the Perth Pathfinders, Team Clova or snaik to move west what mix of cache types and number of caches would temp folks to spend £50 on a day trip to a hebridean island/peninsula?

 

Oh and I've already made a start of the Arran Ales at the Catacol Bay Hotel :D

 

I for one would visit... but, i'm a weekend Argyllite and love the place. Really what you'll find is it'll likely be very seasonal for visits. I find that my Lunga caches are that way. However, what everyone misses is that the best time for caching in Argyll, is winter, when the temperatures are cool and the skies are crystal clear, and the light truly amazing. No midges, sheepticks or waist high bracken.

 

Place the caches and people will come, maybe not in the numbers you'd get on the main mainland, tho'.. Place the caches more the better.... go for it i say, there is a real joy to placing caches.

 

Aye,

 

ken.

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