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In response to the OP, I felt sorry for the dog owner as well as Nick. He/she was probably what they thought to be a responsible dog owner or they would not have given their details so readily. Unfortunately they made the mistake of trusting their dog enough to let it off the lead in public, but they must now pay for their actions.

The Police, no doubt, will follow through and the dog will be destroyed.

 

"All" dogs have the potential to bite if they feel threatened and although Nick was posing no threat, the dog perceived a threat, so attacked.

 

Even the best trained dog will defend itself if it feels threatened, the same as any of us would. It is a basic animal instinct. If any legislation were needed then having all dogs on leads in public places may help but there will always be exceptions.

 

I really don't understand why dog owners feel it necessary to defend the reputation of their dogs. People are much more important than dogs.

 

I don't think any dog owner would defend the reputation of a dog that bit anyone, in a public place, and no one has here. I would defend responsible dogs and owners as strongly as I would condemn irresponsible dogs or owners.

 

"Some" people are much more important than "some" dogs, I would agree with. Here is a link for you to look at, would you feel it necessary to defend the "people" responsible for this? Link

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We really appreciate those owners who on seeing us approach reach down and clip the lead on the dog until we pass.

 

We did not appreciate the alsation chasing Kelly down the tow path with the owner just staring doing and saying nothing other than its OK (the dog was larger than Kelly).

 

Its the owners with no control or the sense to know some people are scared of dogs who need training.

 

Itys interesting to note that at the events we have attended the dogs appear to be well behaved if occasionally very daft. :laughing: obviously going out regularly with your dog encourages better training, control and the afformentioned sense.

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I really do think this is becoming a dog versus anti dog thread and I agree with Stuey it is becoming offensive to us responsible dog owners.

 

The thread needs to be put back on topic, or closed.

 

This was supposed to be about Nick being bitten :laughing: and his question was about detterants.

 

M :rolleyes:

 

Oops its so easy to get dragged OT.

 

We encourage the children to stand still and avoid eye contact ie act as though you are indifferent to the dog it soon gets bored and runs off.

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I must say that I am very disappointed by many of the comments in this topic. I would like to think that these cases are issolated incidents. It appears that Nick has done everything correctly, and quite rightly the dogs should be reported and dealt with appropriately.

 

Personally I feel that should a dog bite a person the owner should be put down, this is mainly because if a dog bites it tends to be poor controll or lack of training. However should the dog be threatened or provoked the provokee should be put down! :laughing:

 

I have to keep deleting my text from here on as I am finding it difficult to say something without possibly offending some of the dog detesters on here. Please remember that there are a lot of good dogs out there with very responsible dog owners, we only tend to hear the worst from the "sick bad news culture" that we now live in. :rolleyes:

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Sorry to hear of your troubles Nick. I have been approached many times by dogs whilst out caching but only once have I felt threatened with the dig barking and showing it's teeth and thankfully my kids were not with me on that occasion.

The owner of the dog was close by but did nothing what so ever to call the dog off which left me feeling like I was not welcome in the area even though it was on a public footpath.

My point being, yes maybe the dog was at fault but I feel if a dog has a tendency to be aggressive towards strangers then the dog owner is to blame for letting the dog off the lead in the first place.

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We've neer been bitten by a dog but whilst out caching the other week we were approached by someone with a dog - well I say dog but it was more the size of a small bear!! Ms Chizu is only small and the "bear" took a keen interest in her - the owner was stuggling to keep it under control but he eventually managed to get it away! Was an interesting encounter but we laugh about it now :laughing:

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correct me if i'm wrong, but dog owners used to require a licence in this country a few years ago I think - why was that stopped?

 

No idea - I assume as it was just a bit of paper it wasn't thought worth keeping. It was replaced (I believe) with a requirement that all dogs have a tag with owners name and address on it. But many owners don't realise that.

 

Didn't it get to the point where the price of the license wasn't covering the costs of running the scheme. When realistic prices for the license were discussed there were calls that it would only end up punishing little old ladies who's dog was their only companion, while the irresponsible owners who were the cause of most of the dog problems didn't bother with a license anyway - so in the end they scrapped it.

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correct me if i'm wrong, but dog owners used to require a licence in this country a few years ago I think - why was that stopped?

 

No idea - I assume as it was just a bit of paper it wasn't thought worth keeping. It was replaced (I believe) with a requirement that all dogs have a tag with owners name and address on it. But many owners don't realise that.

 

Didn't it get to the point where the price of the license wasn't covering the costs of running the scheme. When realistic prices for the license were discussed there were calls that it would only end up punishing little old ladies who's dog was their only companion, while the irresponsible owners who were the cause of most of the dog problems didn't bother with a license anyway - so in the end they scrapped it.

 

I think they got rid of it as people were buying black&white dogs such as Dalmations becuase the licence was cheaper :laughing:

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I must say that I am very disappointed by many of the comments in this topic. I would like to think that these cases are issolated incidents. It appears that Nick has done everything correctly, and quite rightly the dogs should be reported and dealt with appropriately.

 

Personally I feel that should a dog bite a person the owner should be put down, this is mainly because if a dog bites it tends to be poor controll or lack of training. However should the dog be threatened or provoked the provokee should be put down! :rolleyes:

 

I have to keep deleting my text from here on as I am finding it difficult to say something without possibly offending some of the dog detesters on here. Please remember that there are a lot of good dogs out there with very responsible dog owners, we only tend to hear the worst from the "sick bad news culture" that we now live in. :(

I assure you that dog misbehaviour is very common indeed, and hope that the "disappointment" is because you have seen how much of it goes on. On an average walking day of about 18 miles through a averagely populated area of the UK, I would expect be charged by a dog at least once. This is after passing perhaps a hundred dogs without a problem (I don't resent every dog and owner!). Probably half a dozen times on a Sunday. Likelihood of getting bitten - slight, as I'm experienced with these situations (although my son has been bitten quite badly: very frightening and no sympathy from the owner).

 

Like you, I blame the lack of discipline and training, so it is NOT a case of "dog detestation" (who said they detested dogs in this thread anyway?). However, I don't agree with the extreme measures you propose against dogs and their owners! :laughing:

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Are we going to put down all the yobs who threaten and spit when you walk past.

who is going to control the vandals who wreck cars and terrify people.

Can you answer those questions White.

More people get put into hospital by young criminals, control them and put them down like you would like to do with Dogs which you called wild animals.

 

Bill Seiko

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I really feel for Nick and any other person who has been attacked by a dog. I can also understand people being wary of dogs. But I am afraid that being a loving dog owner, reading this thread is making me angry and annoyed at the ignorance of some people.

 

 

Oh do behave! Drsolly does not own a dog, it's not his responsibilty to be an expert of dog behaviour, body language, etc etc. It is his legitimate right to defend himself if he gets attacked. Trying to make out that somebody who is going to carry a dazer device is all set to be come a dog attacker is just plain silly.

 

Sorry for singling out Haggis Hunter's posting above, as this is not a personal attack on him, but every time this subject comes up we get the knee jerk reaction that those of us who do not want to be bitten, slobbered over, jumped upon or trample in the by products of somebody else's dog makes us some sort of dog hating monsters.

 

I am sure that the majority of dog owners are perfectly responsible people and I am equally sure that the majority of dogs which are not 100% under control are perfectly fine and the very worst thing they will do is bound all over you, which is not dangerous to the majority of able bodied adults. Please forgive the us for getting annoyed with the minority. I know plenty of dog owners who hate badly controlled dogs just as much, and want to protect their own dogs and not just themselves from them.

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Are we going to put down all the yobs who threaten and spit when you walk past.

who is going to control the vandals who wreck cars and terrify people.

Can you answer those questions White.

More people get put into hospital by young criminals, control them and put them down like you would like to do with Dogs which you called wild animals.

 

Bill Seiko

 

Nowt like calling a spade a spade :(:rolleyes::laughing:

 

But I agree totally :D

 

M B)

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but every time this subject comes up we get the knee jerk reaction that those of us who do not want to be bitten, slobbered over, jumped upon or trample in the by products of somebody else's dog makes us some sort of dog hating monsters.

 

 

I agree with you totally Ali, :laughing: but also sticking up for the dog lovers, you have been into our house after we have been caching together and Jess did none of those things to you did she, :rolleyes: and she's definitely not a wild animal :( we are all being tarred with the same brush and thats not fair, good and bad in everything so I say.

 

Mandy :D

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Just found out, by coincidence, that's is "Dogs for the Diasabled" awareness day on the 29th. :laughing: Maybe there's an opportunity for things to be learnt about well controlled and trained 'working' dogs!

 

James, I read this with surprise.

 

I have just telephoned Dogs for the Disabled and asked if I have missed something, as this sounds important. They don't know anything about it either, perhaps you could give us more detailsof what you have heard pelase?

 

Sorry for dipping slightly-further-up-the-thread-off-topic again, but I wanted to answer this...

 

We had an email around work this morning advertising "Dogs for the Disabled Awareness Day", with attendance from DFTD themselves.. Reading it again, I suppose it may purely be for our place of work, although it's not clear either way! So sorry for the confusion if it is. I just presumed it was national.. because we recognise other awareness days all the time!

 

Sorry if it's just us, but I'll be sure to check out whatever's going on.

 

PS - Thanks so much for such an interesting account of Caesar's life so far and his life with you.. It was really interesting to hear how you help each other so much! I think the description of how he is trained to react to different situations was really interesting/useful too, and relevant to this topic.

 

He sounds like an amazing chap and you must be VERY proud of him. I was sorry to hear about the nasty incident which must have been very distressing but Caesar sounds like he did a brilliant job of protecting you.

 

Best wishes to you and him!

 

Sorry...back on topic now.

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I agree with you totally Ali, :D but also sticking up for the dog lovers, you have been into our house after we have been caching together and Jess did none of those things to you did she, :rolleyes: and she's definitely not a wild animal :( we are all being tarred with the same brush and thats not fair, good and bad in everything so I say.

 

I have met lots of caching canines and they have all been pretty well behaved. Apparently you are just not anyone unless Chester has peed on your tent, so I will live with that, if that's the worst thing that's going to happen to me! :laughing:

 

I would say again, responsible dog owners ALSO do not wish to be bitten, jumped on chased, slobbed over or discover discarded bags of other people's dog poo, just as non-dog owners do not want to... and of course they have the added worry of badly controlled dogs attacking their own pets too.

 

By the way, I understand that under law a dog is not classified as a wild animal but as a domestic one, and therefore the owners ARE responsible for their behaviour and are not allowed to let them roam free.

Edited by Alibags
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I do not own a dog, I'd like a dog, but I am responsible - I work full time and live on my own.

I know it'd be cruel to have one.

 

However... just because I love dogs does not mean that I'm not a magnet for them to jump up, and / or bark at me!!

 

I was bitten as a child, and that still lives with me, I am very wary of dogs I don't know, and I would steer well away from a barking or growling dog.

 

Some dog owners I have met whilst out caching have been so polite - reining their dog in to let me pass, whilst others have allowed huge lolloping gogs to jump all over me.

 

I was pleased that Bill make the link between yobs and dogs...

WhatI say is that badly behaved dogs are akin to badly behaved children... It's largely the parents fault!

 

If your dog is well trained and YOU are the master instead of the dog ruling you, then YOU have the control.

 

I wonder if Nick was to have met the kids of the Dog owner - I would lay money that they were little B*ggers!!

 

If you want proof of that - look at Wendy's Dog Cesar. He is a fabulous dog because he's been trained to be so....

Edited by HazelS
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OK, THIS IS NOT AN ANTI DOG POST, but is there anything I can do to make myself less likey to dog attacks and what SHOULD OR CAN I do to defend myself?

 

As a cat owner, is this the reason and should I simple give all dogs a very wide berth?

 

I have now thought about a can of pepper spray but not sure if they are legal in the UK?

 

Regards

 

Nick, sitting on half a chair typing with one hand :laughing:

 

Back to the issue of "what SHOULD OR CAN I do to defend myself".

 

Some more research with Google found this:

 

http://www.maplin.co.uk/Search.aspx?criter...p;source=15#faq

 

It's a lot cheaper than the Dog Dazer (£12 compared with about £38), and works on the same idea of being a high pitched whistle. It says it emits 90db of sound (which is loud, but not painfully so). I have no idea how effective it is, but Maplins is a reputable company.

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It's high time that people were prohibited from keeping wild animals, and especially from taking them out in public.

 

My sympathy is with Nick, and with the relatives of all those - mostly children - who've been seriously injured by these "pets".

 

Most dog owners just don't care. The dog runs around all over the place; the owner yells at it ineffectually; the dog does its business and the owner walks off and leaves it.

 

Just what is the point anyway? I can understand the need for a working dog, but the others?

UNBELIEVABLE!!!! :lol::D:laughing::rolleyes:

 

 

I used to own a dog. I can understand elementary dog; I know what a wagging tail means, and I know what a deep growl and bared teeth means. But I don't claim expertise, only elementary knowledge. When a dog sprints towards me, barking loudly, then rushes about barking at me, I can't understand him. When the dog I referred to behaved like that, I was unable to interpret that as "I don't like people wearing hats" until the owner came up a few minutes later and told me about it.

 

Another time, some weeks back, there was a similar incident. With this one, the owner came up a few minutes later and explained "It's because you're carrying a stick" (referring to the walking poles we use).

 

Neither of these was what I'd call an attack, of course. But if I went up to a complete stranger and started shouting in his face, that would be unacceptable behaviour.

 

I do like dogs. And 99% or more of the dogs we meet while out walking are nice and well behaved; maybe a quick sniff at my ankles, which I don't mind at all, or a quick bark of "hello", and then bounding off to do other dogly things. I am not anti-dog, I am not anti-dog-owners. But I don't like badly-behaved dogs, and Nick's experience explains why.

Thank you, that clears up for me your opinion on this subject.

 

I really feel for Nick and any other person who has been attacked by a dog. I can also understand people being wary of dogs. But I am afraid that being a loving dog owner, reading this thread is making me angry and annoyed at the ignorance of some people.

 

 

Oh do behave! Drsolly does not own a dog, it's not his responsibilty to be an expert of dog behaviour, body language, etc etc. It is his legitimate right to defend himself if he gets attacked. Trying to make out that somebody who is going to carry a dazer device is all set to be come a dog attacker is just plain silly.

 

Sorry for singling out Haggis Hunter's posting above, as this is not a personal attack on him, but every time this subject comes up we get the knee jerk reaction that those of us who do not want to be bitten, slobbered over, jumped upon or trample in the by products of somebody else's dog makes us some sort of dog hating monsters.

I don't mind you quoting me at all, but can I point out that the quote you have used was generalised and not aimed solely at drsolly's comments.

 

At the point of making that comment, I must admit that the thread wasn't that anti, can you imagine how I am feeling now?? :(B)

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It's high time that people were prohibited from keeping wild animals, and especially from taking them out in public.

 

My sympathy is with Nick, and with the relatives of all those - mostly children - who've been seriously injured by these "pets".

 

Most dog owners just don't care. The dog runs around all over the place; the owner yells at it ineffectually; the dog does its business and the owner walks off and leaves it.

 

Just what is the point anyway? I can understand the need for a working dog, but the others?

 

I guess you won't be wanting to join my Who Stole the Sausages or my Geodogs posting tbs then :laughing::o:rolleyes::D:(

 

Sorry trying to lighten things up a bit B)

 

Mandy :lol:

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It's high time that people were prohibited from keeping wild animals, and especially from taking them out in public.

 

My sympathy is with Nick, and with the relatives of all those - mostly children - who've been seriously injured by these "pets".

 

Most dog owners just don't care. The dog runs around all over the place; the owner yells at it ineffectually; the dog does its business and the owner walks off and leaves it.

 

Just what is the point anyway? I can understand the need for a working dog, but the others?

 

I guess you won't be wanting to join my Who Stole the Sausages or my Geodogs posting tbs then B):(:P:D:D

 

Sorry trying to lighten things up a bit :D

 

Mandy :D

 

:laughing::rolleyes::(B):lol::oB)

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To defend Alan White for a moment, there are very good moral arguments against keeping another intelligent animal (or any animal!) as a pet. The exploitation of one species by another, blah blah blah. But I'd say this thread isn't the place for that argument. It's not really geocaching-related either, so I'd steer clear of that sort of discussion on this forum full stop.

 

As someone who's never been bitten, yet has dealt with some aggressive dogs while caching, perhaps I can give a bit of advice. If a dog ever comes towards me I act as if s/he's my best friend, without actually giving him or her a hand to bite. I make playful fussing sorts of noises, as if his or her exposed teeth are all part of the game. I'm not sure if this calms the dog, or just confuses it enough so it fails to carry out its threats, but it works for me. My mum, on the other hand, always goes walking with a good solid stick...

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Sorry trying to lighten things up a bit :laughing:

And thanks for doing so :rolleyes:

 

The problem is that dogs are like Marmite. You either love them or hate them. And those who love them can't understand why those who hate them do so, and vice versa.

 

Me, I just want to be able to be in public places without fear of being attacked, intimidated, threatened, or just made to feel uncomfortable, by dogs whose owners couldn't care less. The owners on here may not be among them, but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

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Sorry trying to lighten things up a bit :(

And thanks for doing so :laughing:

 

The problem is that dogs are like Marmite. You either love them or hate them. And those who love them can't understand why those who hate them do so, and vice versa.

 

Me, I just want to be able to be in public places without fear of being attacked, intimidated, threatened, or just made to feel uncomfortable, by dogs whose owners couldn't care less. The owners on here may not be among them, but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

 

I appreciate that, that goes for myself my husband and my kids and Jess we all want to walk without fear.

 

What did annoy me was your quote of "MOST owners just don't care" ........ :lol::D

 

Thats just not true irresponsible owners don't care :rolleyes:

 

Mandy B)

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Being an owner of 2 big dogs (staffie and a bullmastiff cross) more people than not are slightly apprehensive when approaching mine on or off the lead. the bull mastiff was a rescue case who whose badly treated prior to us getting him. this now has an adverse effect on him, which is he has a real fear of men. so any woman or child can play with him stroke him or the likes but men thats a different story. he would run through walls to get away. but he has discovered when he barks that also has a good effect, i.e the person goes away usually with speed. so in a nut shell. his bark is worse than his bite. my only fear is that he has not been cornered yet perhaps then the reverse of this saying might be true.

I am very careful where and when i let him run off the lead because of this.

 

As for your own case, i think it is a combination of things the cat smell the smell of fear(whatever that smells like...soiled boxers perhaps?) but its not your fault and would fully agree with you taking any preventitive measures you feel correct.

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Sorry trying to lighten things up a bit :laughing:

And thanks for doing so :rolleyes:

 

The problem is that dogs are like Marmite. You either love them or hate them. And those who love them can't understand why those who hate them do so, and vice versa.

 

Me, I just want to be able to be in public places without fear of being attacked, intimidated, threatened, or just made to feel uncomfortable, by dogs whose owners couldn't care less. The owners on here may not be among them, but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

 

Just replace the word 'dog' with 'children' or 'teenagers', and a lot of people would agree with that too :(

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Just a word of warning on ultrasonics...if you can't hear them - then how do you know they are working?

How do you know the battery isn't going flat?

 

More importantly how do you know its not going of in your pocket/rucksck all the time? At least with this you get to hear if its working or not :laughing:

 

According to the advertisement, there's a light comes on when it's making the sound.

 

I don't know how I'll know if it's active while it's in my pocket, but I'm hoping that the vendors will have thought of that. When the unit arrives, I'll have a look, and report on what I find.

 

I'm not arguing against the "Dog stop", I've not tried any of these yet.

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but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

Extremely rough guess I think. Even people who are against dogs that have posted on this thread think it's the other way around. It's more like 1 or 2 in a 100 that DON'T care about the effect their dog has on other people.

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Me, I just want to be able to be in public places without fear of being attacked, intimidated, threatened, or just made to feel uncomfortable, by dogs whose owners couldn't care less. The owners on here may not be among them, but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

 

Well done you on staying silent on your obvious daily torture for so long!

 

Now, I happen to know that the "statistic" you quote is absolutely bogus. As HH has pointed out, it is more than likely the other way around.

 

Before you jump in and say, well she would say that wouldn't she, I have met many, many, many dogs and their owners. Just like in any other walk of life, there are good, bad and frankly ugly. I tend to be walking in places at times when nobody other than a dog owner would even consider being there, and there are very few dogs that I come across that are truly out of control in the manner that you describe.

 

No, I haven't been bitten myself, yes, my dog has been attacked by unruly, out of control and maladjusted dogs. I have been set upon by an out of control and maladjusted man though! Go figure!!!!!!!!!!

 

In addition to our own, I have had the opportunity to walk my dog in 6 other countries in the past year, and in my experience, by and large, dogs here are better behaved than elsewhere when free running. However, I would draw attention to my comment, in my experience.

 

It's sad that your interactions with dogs have been so negative and got your hackles up ... however, equally sad is your inability to differentiate between the good and bad in an entire species.

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but I encounter very few owners (rough guess: 1 in a 100) who care about the effect their dog has on other people.

Extremely rough guess I think. Even people who are against dogs that have posted on this thread think it's the other way around. It's more like 1 or 2 in a 100 that DON'T care about the effect their dog has on other people.

I can only comment on my own experiences. I stand by my guess. YMMV.

 

As an example, an owner who cares about how other people feel about their dog would always have the dog on a lead, both to ensure that they know where it is and to prevent it running up to strangers. But most dogs I see when out caching are not on leads.

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As an example, an owner who cares about how other people feel about their dog would always have the dog on a lead, both to ensure that they know where it is and to prevent it running up to strangers. But most dogs I see when out caching are not on leads.

 

I see by your avatar you have a son, maybe its an older photograph, but the same principal, when your out an about do you let him run free and play on the swings and roundabouts ect :lol: or do you make him hold your hand at all times? :D

When he goes to the loo do you hold his hand at all times? :laughing:

 

Let's be real here your son runs free and plays, I let Jess run free and play too, we all need a bit of "free time" when we are in a safe area to do so, and clean up after her and dispose of it properly.

 

Donmoore said earlier one of his dogs had a problem so he kept it on a leader, thats a responsible owner :rolleyes: we have never had any problems with Jess so she has her free time too :( if there was something she had a problem with she would be called back and put on her lead.

 

Mandy B)

Edited by Us 4 and Jess
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As an example, an owner who cares about how other people feel about their dog would always have the dog on a lead,

 

always!? Why on earth would I put the dog on a lead when there is no one else about?

 

or even when there IS someone about, when I knew for a certainty that i could call it to heel immediately. And I do mean with a certainty. The reason I know that is that my dog was well trained and obedient.

 

I can absolutely honestly say I feel considerably more threatened by certain rogue elements in modern society, and I wouldn't dream of having teenagers kept on a lead (nice idea though :laughing: ) I can appreciate that not all teenagers are the same, and the 17 year old who lives a few doors along is a nice kid (if kid is the right word...)

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I can only comment on my own experiences. I stand by my guess. YMMV.

 

As an example, an owner who cares about how other people feel about their dog would always have the dog on a lead, both to ensure that they know where it is and to prevent it running up to strangers. But most dogs I see when out caching are not on leads.

I don't know what YMMV means, can someone let me know please?

 

Now onto the other point. I am a First Aider and enjoy the role immensely, I also can't walk past a person who is in need of help or any other living being without stopping and trying to help.

 

I like to think that makes me a caring person, but I also let my dogs of the lead when people are around, as I know that my dogs won't hurt anyone. I never stop kids from wanting to pet them as I am totally certain that they are safe. In your analogy that makes me an uncaring person. For those that have met me in person will know that is simply not true.

 

I therefore resent your implication that I and others on here are uncaring. Before you say that you think people on here are responsible your 1 - 100 comment says to the contrary.

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As an example, an owner who cares about how other people feel about their dog would always have the dog on a lead,

 

always!? Why on earth would I put the dog on a lead when there is no one else about?

And herein lies the problem. How do you know there's no-one about? Footpaths tend not to be straight. There are few things more scary (to someone who hates dogs) than turning a bend to find a dog standing in the path with no sign of the owner. The only way to be sure that doesn't happen is to keep the dog on a lead at all times.

Edited by Alan White
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....I wonder how you define an aggressive bark?

 

I think I would be absolutely furious if you carried a pepper spray with you and used it on my dog because you thought it was barking aggressively at you.

 

Pepper spray should not be used by the inexperienced in any circumstances, and I would counsel against it being used willy nilly because of peceived danger, particularly against an animal. :laughing:

 

My dog occasionally barks and charges around while off the lead, are you going to pepper spray him if our paths cross? I would hope not. :huh: ...

 

If I'm in fear for my safety and especially the safety of my kids, I'll pepperspray your dog and not think twice about it. It's really quite simple. While you as a dog owner (and I also have a dog) may know your dogs bark and growls and when it's starting to mean business, I as a stranger to your dog don't. If your dog is on your leash and under control then I would have nothing to fear.

 

Pepper spray is a very good thing to use by the inexpereinced. First not much else is allowed, and most other things are much more permanent forms of doggy determent from which your pet may never recover or be the same even if your dog was mearly barking and running about off the lead like a well behaved pet.

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Come on tell me that this isn't just lovable? :huh::cry:

 

1. Why do people assume that if you criticise some dog owners, that you don't like dogs? This thread is about how to avoid being attacked by dogs. It turns out that lots of us have experience of being attacked (not necessarily leading to injury). As far as I can see, no-one (well, perhaps one) is saying that they don't like dogs, although some are understandably wary. We are exploring why the attacks occur, and it seems that it is usually due to inconsiderate dog owners (no accusations of anyone here) who don't see a problem in letting their dog run at strangers, as they know that it's unlikely to lead to physical harm (merely a perfectly acceptable level of discomfort and inconvenience for the stranger).

 

2. If it's correct than "only" 1 in 100 owners would allow their dog to worry a passing geocacher/walker/jogger (I'm not disputing that), it confirms my observations. But that's a lot! On a popular day, in a dog-walking area, chances are you'll have to be confronted with one of these. Many geocaches are sited in such areas, and it's no use the owner shouting "don't worry, he won't hurt you" - by then you've already been forced to find that out the scary way- or find that the owner was wrong, in some cases! :laughing:

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...is there anything I can do to make myself less likey to dog attacks and what SHOULD OR CAN I do to defend myself? ...

 

Bone up on dogs a bit. They do have signs they give when they are a potential threat. There are things you can do to show the dog that you are the top dog and you are not going to be taking any crap from that dog. If you behave right the dog will normally get the message and leave you to your business. But you do have to behave right.

 

When I was a kid I was bit by a dog. Strangly I now have no fear of dogs and can stare them all down. They may be able to kick my butt easily if they tried but I think they know that I have no fear of them and they back down. There are evne rules on how they back down that have to be observed or they could attack anyway. (There are some neurotic dogs that don't play by the rules...I give them a wide berth).

 

Recently I ignored the rules on a little yapper dog that was giving 'the signs'. I figured he was so small that I could just ignore them. Wrong. I turned my back, walked away about my busines and that dog did exaclty what I knew he would but chose to ignore. He ran up and bit my angle. No skin broken (it was a dinky yapper dog...) but a good lesson.

 

If the pepper spray makes it so you have less fear around dogs it will make an attack less likely and that's worth the price already and you don't even have to use it.

Edited by Renegade Knight
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If the pepper spray makes it so you have less fear around dogs it will make an attack less likely and that's worth the price already and you don't even have to use it.

 

Quote:

 

In the United Kingdom, where it is classed as an offensive weapon, the sale and possession of pepper spray is illegal under section five of the Firearms Act. First time offenders are likely to receive a police caution. Although legal for police officers, recent debates have arisen whether such a weapon should be legal for civilians as means of defensive purposes only.

 

End Quote.

 

Source

 

I would counsel against encouraging people to break the law!

Edited by Dorsetgal & GeoDog
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....I wonder how you define an aggressive bark?

 

I think I would be absolutely furious if you carried a pepper spray with you and used it on my dog because you thought it was barking aggressively at you.

 

Pepper spray should not be used by the inexperienced in any circumstances, and I would counsel against it being used willy nilly because of peceived danger, particularly against an animal. :laughing:

 

My dog occasionally barks and charges around while off the lead, are you going to pepper spray him if our paths cross? I would hope not. :huh: ...

 

If I'm in fear for my safety and especially the safety of my kids, I'll pepperspray your dog and not think twice about it. It's really quite simple. While you as a dog owner (and I also have a dog) may know your dogs bark and growls and when it's starting to mean business, I as a stranger to your dog don't. If your dog is on your leash and under control then I would have nothing to fear.

 

 

Errrr, excuse me, I never once said, nor suggested that my dog would growl!

 

The illustration was used to explain to drsolly that a barking dog does not equal an aggressive dog.

 

Dogs can and do bark joyously at times, as a dog owner yourself, I would have thought you would have understood that!

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I've got absolutely nothing against dogs at all and have always been comfortable around them. I've never had ANY problems with dogs before, but this month I've been randomly attacked while caching twice! I'm totally bewildered as to why this is happening all of a sudden. No cats at home or anything like that.

 

First was a staffordshire bull terrier that attacked very fast and totally silently from behind, while my mum and I were walking back from finding 'Oliver's Clay House Cache' near Elland. It went absolutely beserk but luckily attached itself to my leg by chomping across the sole of my walking boots. I was so shocked I didn't even have time to see it or react.

 

The second was this Sunday when another dog attacked me while I was walking along a track in National Trust woodland. Again very fast, totally silently and without warning. This time it came from a long way out in front of me at about 20 mph and it didn't stop to take the time to find out who was boss.

 

I wasn't bothered before....I am now boderline apprehensive whenever I see a dog. I hope my luck changes very soon and everything reverts to status quo! :laughing:

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I've got absolutely nothing against dogs at all and have always been comfortable around them. I've never had ANY problems with dogs before, but this month I've been randomly attacked while caching twice! I'm totally bewildered as to why this is happening all of a sudden. No cats at home or anything like that.

 

First was a staffordshire bull terrier that attacked very fast and totally silently from behind, while my mum and I were walking back from finding 'Oliver's Clay House Cache' near Elland. It went absolutely beserk but luckily attached itself to my leg by chomping across the sole of my walking boots. I was so shocked I didn't even have time to see it or react.

 

The second was this Sunday when another dog attacked me while I was walking along a track in National Trust woodland. Again very fast, totally silently and without warning. This time it came from a long way out in front of me at about 20 mph and it didn't stop to take the time to find out who was boss.

 

I wasn't bothered before....I am now boderline apprehensive whenever I see a dog. I hope my luck changes very soon and everything reverts to status quo! :laughing:

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