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More Geo-Terminology


Team Merlin
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screw you guys :(

 

I'm switching to Marvins

 

i like marvins. muggles was never a term i cared for so i think it'll be marvins..........yes, marvins...

and that makes 2.

 

Alert prime suspect's lexicon - I ain't going back...

 

Marvins marvins everywhere but not a cache in sight.

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What about Mundanes?
Already taken. This term, as you may know is reserved for those who attend renaissance faires in street clothes and don't dress in the garb of the historical period represented ....
I'd like to take this time to go on record with the fact that I have never attended a renaissance fair.

 

Since when has dressing in purple polyester crushed velvet represented the 'garb of the historical period represented'? And dont even get me started on 'elves!!'. Use of the term muggles is positively benign in comparison.

 

A local variant seen round these parts is 'Doggles' for dog walking 'muggles' :(

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screw you guys :(

 

I'm switching to Marvins

 

i like marvins. muggles was never a term i cared for so i think it'll be marvins..........yes, marvins...

and that makes 2.

 

Alert prime suspect's lexicon - I ain't going back...

 

Marvins marvins everywhere but not a cache in sight.

Yes, did someone call me? 68778_400.jpg

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screw you guys :sad:

 

I'm switching to Marvins

 

i like marvins. muggles was never a term i cared for so i think it'll be marvins..........yes, marvins...

and that makes 2.

 

Alert prime suspect's lexicon - I ain't going back...

 

Marvins marvins everywhere but not a cache in sight.

 

I like the idea of switching to another term. :( I refuse to use the word "muggle" in conversation, since I've always thought it was silly. I usually refer to others as pedestrians, hikers, shoppers, etc depending on the setting, though I'll usually just call them "non-cachers".

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I like muggle, and it's not just for non-geocachers anymore!

 

It's being used by many groups to indicate 'someone who is not one of us'.

 

From http://catb.org/jargon/html/index.html

 

muggle

[from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter books, 1998] A non-wizard. Not as disparaging as luser; implies vague pity rather than contempt. In the universe of Rowling's enormously (and deservedly) popular children's series, muggles and wizards inhabit the same modern world, but each group is ignorant of the commonplaces of the others' existence — most muggles are unaware that wizards exist, and wizards (used to magical ways of doing everything) are perplexed and fascinated by muggle artifacts.

 

In retrospect it seems completely inevitable that hackers would adopt this metaphor, and in hacker usage it readily forms compounds such as muggle-friendly. Compare luser, mundane, chainik, newbie.

 

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chainik: /chi:�nik/

[Russian, literally “teapot”] Almost synonymous with muggle. Implies both ignorance and a certain amount of willingness to learn, but does not necessarily imply as little experience or short exposure time as newbie and is not as derogatory as luser. Both a novice user and someone using a system for a long time without any understanding of the internals can be referred to as chainiks. Very widespread term in Russian hackish, often used in an English context by Russian-speaking hackers esp. in Israel (e.g. “Our new colleague is a complete chainik”). FidoNet discussion groups often had a “chainik” subsection for newbies and, well, old chainiks (eg. su.asm.chainik, ru.linux.chainik, ru.html.chainik). Public projects often have a chainik mailing list to keep the chainiks off the developers' and experienced users' discussions. Today, the word is slowly slipping into mainstream Russian due to the Russian translation of the popular yellow-black covered “foobar for dummies” series, which (correctly) uses “chainik” for “dummy”, but its frequent (though not excessive) use is still characteristic hacker-speak.

 

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There's even a Kill The Muggles game!

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I too, feel uncomfortable with the term "Muggle". I also see a need for a word or phrase to identify those "not of the body". I prefer the term "Landru". Just kidding. I have used "Civilian" in a couple of logs to describe non caching types hanging out in the area I was seaching. A term that readily distiguishes "us" from "them". Only 2 more letters on the ol' keyboard. Maybe not the most interesting choice, but gets the job done.

 

My Two Cents :laughing:

Edited by ct_alt_del
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I remember a thread some time ago on this topic where someone suggested using "norm" as a replacement for "muggle." This seemed brilliant to me... you could yell "norm" to someone you're caching with to warn them of approaching muggles, and the approaching muggles would simply think you're yelling your friend's name. Brilliant! (So why didn't it catch on?)

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I remember a thread some time ago on this topic where someone suggested using "norm" as a replacement for "muggle." This seemed brilliant to me... you could yell "norm" to someone you're caching with to warn them of approaching muggles, and the approaching muggles would simply think you're yelling your friend's name. Brilliant! (So why didn't it catch on?)

Because Marvin works so much better. :laughing:

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As MAY have been discussed already, in Harry Potter, muggles are NON-magic users. It's not derogatory, its just a term. I use the term, even when explaining the game to muggles. I make the the HP reference and they understand. Yes, its a geek term, but lets be honest, its a geek game we play :blink: . I love caching, both hiding and seeking, and the more imaginative the better. This is one game that forces us to get out and walk (good for us) and use our brains (when its a GOOD cache). I can think of nothing better to do with the bits of time in between doing muggle stuff. SO MUGGLE IT IS AND MUGGLE IT SHALL BE, Don't like it, well your just a Muggophile (That's right I coined that term right here). It's ok to be a muggle, its bad to be a muggophile and muggophobe. :unsure:

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I remember a thread some time ago on this topic where someone suggested using "norm" as a replacement for "muggle." This seemed brilliant to me... you could yell "norm" to someone you're caching with to warn them of approaching muggles, and the approaching muggles would simply think you're yelling your friend's name. Brilliant! (So why didn't it catch on?)

Because Marvin works so much better. :unsure:

But what do you do when the muggle's name is Norm or Marvin???? :blink:;)

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One thing some locals use instead of muggle is "squirrel". If you're in a rather populated area and see someone, calling out "muggles" to your caching pal sounds odd, especiall if said muggle is within hearing distance. Calling out "Squirrels coming" or "I see a squirrel" makes you sound like some nature-deprived city slicker fascinated by commonplace rodents, but it gets the point across without sounding like you're from another planet.

 

It's more useful when spoken, not so much in online logs though. I still call 'em muggles in my logs.

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I dont like 'muggle' either and never use it, except to express my distaste at the term. I certainly wouldn't use it when explaining caching because then you're highlighting the idea that "you're not one of us" to the person you hope to interest in caching.

 

I think its rather corny and shows a lack of originality on the part of our community to borrow such an obvious comparision from such a popular source....... but thats just me. If we don't agree on Marvin then maybe we could go with Millicent as in Millicent Bystander.

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As part of The Ramblers quote says

" Most muggles are unaware that wizards exist, and wizards (used to magical ways of doing everything) are perplexed and fascinated by muggle artifacts'

 

If we are the wizards{ which I think we are] Muggles is the correct word.

 

Here's how I see it.

 

Most muggles are unaware that CACHERS exist, and CACHERS (used to magical ways of doing everything) are perplexed and fascinated by muggle artifacts.

So there!

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As part of The Ramblers quote says

" Most muggles are unaware that wizards exist, and wizards (used to magical ways of doing everything) are perplexed and fascinated by muggle artifacts'

 

If we are the wizards{ which I think we are] Muggles is the correct word.

 

Here's how I see it.

 

Most muggles are unaware that CACHERS exist, and CACHERS (used to magical ways of doing everything) are perplexed and fascinated by muggle artifacts.

So there!

 

That's a hard one to argue with! (Although I do like the idea of 'squirrels' or other nature reference when you're in the field and need to alert your cachemates.)

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