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Hunting Season


tangerineman
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Does anyone know how to find out where and when hunting season is taking place in Southern Ontario? The horrible tragedy of a 67-year-old hiker being shot and killed accidentally by a hunter this week, in one of the forests just outside of Toronto has brought this question close to home.

 

This woman was probably on a trail, not bushwacking through the forest with as much stealth as possible.

 

Having just started geocaching in April, this is my first hunting season as a cacher. It would be helpful to have an idea of which forests hunters are allowed in - which areas to avoid.

 

Does everyone just urban cache in the meantime?

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Does anyone know how to find out where and when hunting season is taking place in Southern Ontario? The horrible tragedy of a 67-year-old hiker being shot and killed accidentally by a hunter this week, in one of the forests just outside of Toronto has brought this question close to home.

 

This woman was probably on a trail, not bushwacking through the forest with as much stealth as possible.

 

Having just started geocaching in April, this is my first hunting season as a cacher. It would be helpful to have an idea of which forests hunters are allowed in - which areas to avoid.

 

Does everyone just urban cache in the meantime?

 

Here in PA where there are hunters in the woods just about all winter long for various types of hunting seasons, I make it a habit to wear the state required "blaze orange" (vest and hat) any time I go into ANY wooded area. You never know when someone's going to wonder onto property where they shouldn't be hunting (legally or otherwise) or when you may just do the same. Be safe ... be seen.

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Hunting season information should be available where ever hunting licenses are sold. Hopefully someone from Ontario will know of a link for online information and post it here.

 

I'm both a cacher and a hunter and sometimes mix both activities. I agree totally with Lasagna's advice. Wear orange, make some noise and consider not caching around dawn and dusk when visibility is limited.

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Does anyone know how to find out where and when hunting season is taking place in Southern Ontario? The horrible tragedy of a 67-year-old hiker being shot and killed accidentally by a hunter this week, in one of the forests just outside of Toronto has brought this question close to home.

 

This woman was probably on a trail, not bushwacking through the forest with as much stealth as possible.

 

Having just started geocaching in April, this is my first hunting season as a cacher. It would be helpful to have an idea of which forests hunters are allowed in - which areas to avoid.

 

Does everyone just urban cache in the meantime?

 

The woman was wearing red! I completely agree with her son Toby, this was not a "tragic hunting accident" this was manslaughter. I hope he gets the book thrown at him. :laughing:

 

Here's the story from canoe.ca:

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/CityandRegion/...289193-sun.html

Avid hiker shot dead by mistaken deer hunter

Family says there's no excuse as 67-year-old woman killed in forest.

By CP

 

BEETON -- Marianne Schmid loved to walk the leafy paths of the lush public forest near her home west of Tottenham.

 

But the 67-year-old hiker never made the daily trek during hunting season, her family says, because she was wary of hunters shooting at deer or wild turkeys that amble through the pines a 45-minute drive north of Toronto.

 

Schmid didn't know hunting season had begun Monday, and, despite wearing a red sweater and jeans, was shot dead by a hunter who thought she was wild game wandering the woods that afternoon.

 

Provincial police say Schmid was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

Autopsy results released Tuesday show she died of a single gunshot wound to the abdomen.

 

A 60-year-old Keswick man has been charged.

 

"It's stupidity," said her husband Walter. "We'll never -- never -- recover what was destroyed by that one shot."

 

Schmid said his wife had phoned the OPP just last week, "because she had a scare with someone shooting" in the forest.

 

"I keep hearing this was a tragic hunting accident," said Schmid's son, Toby. "This wasn't an accident.

 

"A tree falling on her would be an accident. I thought the cardinal rule for responsible hunters was that you positively identify your target before you pull the trigger."

 

Walter agreed.

 

"We don't understand how anybody could confuse her with a deer," he said. "We're not against hunting, but this is not a hunting accident."

 

The last fatal hunting incident in Ontario was in December 2004.

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The woman was wearing red! I completely agree with her son Toby, this was not a "tragic hunting accident" this was manslaughter. I hope he gets the book thrown at him. :laughing:

I agree that the hunter is totaly at fault here but be aware that red is not blaze. Don't be fooled into a false sense of security by wearing non blaze colors as they do not stand out in the bush.

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Blaze is bright, bright, bright orange. AKA "hunter orange". I like to wear hunting requirements in the bush this time of year: torso completely covered in orange, and also an orange hat. Vests and hats are available at Wal-Mart and are inexpensive.

The shotgun season for deer is generally the first week in November and the first week in December in southern Ontario, though I believe there are additional weeks in some areas. Bow hunting for deer usually runs the entire fall/early winter season.

Information on your area in Ontario can be found on the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources website.

 

This is a horrific incident. As the article states, the cardinal rule of hunting is to absolutely positively know what it is you're shooting at.

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If you can't tell the difference between an animal and a person in the woods then you should probably not have a gun in your hands.

 

Here Friggin' here.

 

 

This lady was killed in the "Patterson" tract of the Simcoe County Forest outside of Tottenham. This is not dense bush. This is a logged, sparse red-pine stand. I have been in this bush often enough to know that a 67 year old lady wearing a red sweater could NOT be confused as a deer. This is simply ludicrous.

 

Nobody but the hunter involved will ever know exactly what happened here, but anyone that traverses this forest tract will see how ludicrous these claims are.

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Loads of deer hunting up here. You'd be mighty foolish to venture out geocaching, or even walking the family dog along a highway, without wearing BLAZE ORANGE during the hunting season. But, I've even seen 'hunters' wearing their blaze orange garments 'under' a vest or rainproof jacket - not a great plan!

If you beleive you may be anywhere near a hunting area; ASK about the various season dates, and even then use extreme caution in what you chose to wear, or how you squat down to rummage through the twigs and leaves in search of a cache!

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If you need more information, you can also pick up (free) a "hunting regulation" book where ever you buy a licence. I get mine at the Post Office, and it will explain more about the extra hunting seasons in specific areas and it might explain a little more about the requirements of how much Blaze Orange is required by law.

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You can go to the MNR webpage at the following

(http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/index.html) and near the bottom is a link to 2006 hunting regulations which is the following (http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/pubs/pubmenu.html#hunting)

Look up the map for the area you are interested in then look up the area number under all of the individual types of game that they hunt for. Hope this helps.

As far as wearing orange is concerned I recently read that a few years ago two hunters were shot while setting up decoys and both were wearing Orange hats and jackets.

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Having worked for the MNR and spent too much time with some conservation officers, I think it is only safe to say cacher beware. There are enough yahoos out there disobeying signs and regulations etc to make even the most conscientious hunter look bad and make the rest of us worry for our safety.

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I not only cache in these forests with my 3-year old daughter, but also choose to simply take walks in these forests as well...NOT ANYMORE! I am sickened by this. Not to mention any names...but my other half was talking to some hunters last year and asked them if they got anything.

The response was "no, we didn't get anything...we just got some sound shots off."

My other halfg did not know what sound shots were and naively asked for an explanation, which was...."we heard something and shot at it."

 

Now this was further north of here (around Huntsville) where I KNOW there are other caches to be found, avid hikers and outdoor enthusiasts. I am not against hunting at all. I really enjoy eating wild game but really...there was no need for that lady to die in our forests. If a hunter can't make certain that he or she is indeed taking aim at wild game, then don't pull the trigger. I don't think we need gun control...we need moron control....

We also need a ministry of the environment that promotes healthly lifestyles for Ontarians by caring for hikers (even when they carry GPS units) who chose to get exercise in beautiful countryside and forests. There really needs to be signs posted at the entrance way to these forests. I totally forgot that hunting season had begun until I heard the sad story of that lady.

 

Sorry for the strong words...I have been out in this forest series lately with my daughter and can only imagine the worst happening now....too bad this healthly past time is being ruined for us...hope I didn't offend anyone with this.

 

N of the CTI

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I've been shying away from making a post here as I am the total outdoors type. I hunt, fish, geocache, hike, camp.... basically anything outdoors. lol

I really feel for all the individuals that have been involved in a hunting accident. I have seen on the news, every year, and almost every province, accidents that have happened. There is always someone at fault, and it is always the one behind the sights with the hand on the trigger. Every hunter safety/firearm safety class teaches "BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET AND BEYOND", but some of the people with "buck feaver" tend to forget this. I remember a few years ago while out hunting, myself and 2 others were on point waiting while the other 9 were pushing a bush for us. After about 5min. a huge 170+ came out of a third bush about 50 yards away from me.... a perfect shot... but i did not know where the other guy on point exactly was at that time... so I did not take the shot. That simple. IMHO... The ones that can not follow the rules, should have there hunting revoked for some time and forced to retake the hunter / firearm safety classes.

When ever I head out caching on lands where I know hunting exists (basically anything rural), i wear a bright colour jacket and make noise like whistling a favorite tune. I know that the gov's will not mark each and every piece of land that hunters can use as it would be too costly to mark every entrance or access point.

I do not know what the answer is to stop this completly as there is already the education side for the hunter and common sence for the other users. Maybe a bit more advertising for the other users through tv, news paper, park hand-outs, etc. might help out. This is one thread that will ( and has ) poped up from time to time, and I think I will have to put a message up on our prov. geocaching site every year reminding the members that hunting can exist in a caching area.

My best idea would be to get members to mention this in there cache pages as bold text or an icon.

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It would certainly be helpful if there was a public announcement of the beginning of hunting season. Living in a city, and not being a hunter, the thought never crossed my mind. In fact, the day this woman was killed was a spectacular fall day. I would have been out there too, had circumstances allowed. It's rather surprising, really, that there isn't any mention in mainstream media.

 

Thanks to rovers3 for directions to the MNR site. It's all there, but there are so many forests and cross-references it wouldn't be surprising at all to get the dates wrong, or be confused by the myriad of forests, which all seem to have different dates - just as easy as it would be for a hunter to confuse some of the details. I think we're definitely talking 'walker beware' here. I think I'll carry my bear bells, and make a quick trip to The Tire for the latest in blaze orange fashion.

 

Your words aren't too strong at all CowTippinIdiots, I couldn't agree more (I just had to reply to you directly because your cache name makes me grin, and typing it out was even more fun - CowTippinIdiots - there I did it again).

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... and make noise like whistling a favorite tune.

 

now there is an idea for cachers:

- pack into your gear one of those "crank-up"-radios and set them to full blast while in the forrest

- alternatively any other handy stereo-system with enough batteries to tootle away for the entire trip

(I suggest tapes/cds with "noise" uncommon to the woods... a tape of singing birds is probably not going to do the trick...

also make sure not to damage your own ears!)

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Keep in mind that while whistling, a bear bell or carrying a normal level conversation (with other cachers if possible...alone youd look weird :unsure: )could help make nearby hunters aware of your presence, playing a very loud boombox could be considered as deliberately trying to stop people from hunting by scaring game away. That, I believe, is illegal, at least in Quebec and Ontario.

Edited by The red-haired witch
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could help make nearby hunters aware of your presence, playing a very loud boombox could be considered as deliberately trying to stop people from hunting by scaring game away. That, I believe, is illegal, at least in Quebec and Ontario.

 

I would rather be charged of that then pumped full of lead for sounding like a deer in the bush.. BESIDES! It wasn't intentional, I was just trying to make sure you don't mistake me for a street-smart deer, yo.

Edited by Juicepig
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I'm not a hunter myself, but I have read the regulations. A hunter is supposed to identify what he's shooting long before he pulls the trigger, NO EXCEPTIONS. This obviously did not happen.

 

To answer the original question, however, in Ontario, more or less, bow hunting for deer is permitted from September 1 until december 31, rifle hunting in the first week of November.

 

Shotgun hunting for birds and small game is widely permitted. I don't remember the dates.

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Apparently, some cachers wouldn't care at all that, by playing loud music in the woods, they could be ruining the day of all hunters within an area. "Hey, there are some bad hunters, so we should stop all hunters from practicing their activity in our woods!" :huh:

 

To me, that's a lot like those people who, because they heard about some bad geocachers damaging the environment by searching for a cache, want to ban all geocaching in their woods. :huh:

 

Good old case of trying to treat others like you would like to be treated...

 

Take reasonable steps: bright orange clothes, small bell, avoiding the 30 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset (busiest time for hunting, and visibility ot so great)...

 

Yes, some peple are not responsible enough and shouldnt be allowed to hunt. That's no reason to penalize all the ones who are responsible. Anyway, we are much more likely to get killed by an idiot with a car on the road to the cache than by an idiot with a gun on the path to the cache.

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Take reasonable steps: bright orange clothes, small bell, avoiding the 30 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset (busiest time for hunting, and visibility ot so great)...

All good points... which is why I decided not to wear my moose costume while caching on Halloween and opted for this:

moose%20character%20costume.jpgPrisonR16342.jpg

The ball and chain does make good substitute for the bell. :huh:

 

TOMTEC

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Take reasonable steps: bright orange clothes, small bell, avoiding the 30 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset (busiest time for hunting, and visibility ot so great)...

All good points... which is why I decided not to wear my moose costume while caching on Halloween and opted for this:

moose%20character%20costume.jpgPrisonR16342.jpg

The ball and chain does make good substitute for the bell. :huh:

 

TOMTEC

 

Heyyy, I think I saw you out there

 

porky.jpg

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You should wear BLAZE ORANGE while you are caching in the woods from Oct 1 - Dec 31....I am a hunter and hunt very close to where that trajedy took place and quite frankly I am appaled....2 people in my hunting party knew that lady and as far as we are concerned no legitimate hunter will shoot at anything until he/she knows for certain what they are shooting at...I do not consider what hapened and 'accident' I consider it 'sheer negligence'! In the spring you have Turkey hunting which usually starts April 25 and goes to May 31st! Play safe and wear BLAZE ORANGE! Brampton Mike :huh:

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Take reasonable steps: bright orange clothes, small bell, avoiding the 30 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset (busiest time for hunting, and visibility ot so great)...

 

 

Dang hunters get all my prime photography time! Hour before/after sunrise/sunset is THE best time to be taking photos.... one of the primary reasons I got into geocaching in the first place.

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Take reasonable steps: bright orange clothes, small bell, avoiding the 30 minutes before and after sunrise and sunset (busiest time for hunting, and visibility ot so great)...

 

 

Dang hunters get all my prime photography time! Hour before/after sunrise/sunset is THE best time to be taking photos.... one of the primary reasons I got into geocaching in the first place.

 

Don't hold the camera up to your eye. You could be blinded by the flash!

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Well, I'm a runner and have had to give up running trails until next year. The reason I decided to try geocaching was because I have a Garmin Forerunner and I thought I could use it. It worked OK on an easy cache near home yesterday (my first) but I cannot run and wear the high visibility clothing. I'll just have to confine my running to the burbs until spring.

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I cannot run and wear the high visibility clothing.

 

I realise I don't know much about running, but how exactly do brightly colored clothes stop you from running? :laughing:

 

Even if you can't find proper running clothes in bright orange (though I've seen lycra in that color..), the vest I own for hunting is mesh, weights about 100 grams and cost 10$. I don't think it would be a problem to run with one of those on.

 

Also, there is no big game hunting after December 31st anywhere in Ontario, AFAIK, so you certainly don't have to wait until spring to go back in the woods!

Edited by The red-haired witch
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I cannot run and wear the high visibility clothing.

 

I realise I don't know much about running, but how exactly do brightly colored clothes stop you from running? :D

 

Even if you can't find proper running clothes in bright orange (though I've seen lycra in that color..), the vest I own for hunting is mesh, weights about 100 grams and cost 10$. I don't think it would be a problem to run with one of those on.

 

Also, there is no big game hunting after December 31st anywhere in Ontario, AFAIK, so you certainly don't have to wait until spring to go back in the woods!

 

A runner generates a lot of heat and sweat. Moisture control is paramount, particularly in cold weather. The clothing layers are usually carefully selected for moisture wicking, insulation, breathability and non chaffing surfaces and seams. Most running gear is not dull but neither is it blaze orange. It may have light reflecting stripes but that is to make one visible on the road at night. I am not familiar with the jacket you describe but it is unlikely to be suitable. Weight is important but it is not the only consideration.

 

Clothing aside, I don't feel comfortable in the woods when there is clear and obvious evidence men with guns are nearby and shooting (gun shots can be heard). :P

 

After Dec 31, most trails will be snow covered and it is unlikely any runner would try running in snow and/or slippery conditions.

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I couldn't find an exact picture, but here are some images. Lots of those vests are available in open mesh, very breathable. Those are not jackets, they only cover part of your chest and back... just enough to be highly visible. They go on top (obviously) of your normal clothes, so you can wear all your usual gear. The difference in comfort should be minimal. Maybe enough that you wouldn't wear it in a competition, but certainly not enough to be a problem in training.

 

If you don't want to go in the woods because the idea of hunters being around makes you uncomfortable, I understand. The sound of gunshots makes me nervous too. But saying that you can't go in the woods because wearing a safety vesty is too much of an inconvenient... well, that does seem a bit silly.

 

As for trail running in the snow and ice, lots of people do it in the area here. Those crazy people even run with snowshoes on when the snow is too deep :huh:

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