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Whats the record?


Bundyrumandcoke
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I am planning a caching blitz on our state capital city in the next 2 weeks. Planning is well underway, with the intention of beating Queenslands one day cache record of 52. Our national record, previously 73, has in the last couple of days been blown away as it now stands at 101 finds for one 24 hour period. So, this begs the question. What is the world record for most caches found in one 24 hour period (midnight to midnight)? Cheers Bundy

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What is the world record for most caches found in one 24 hour period (midnight to midnight)?

Depends on what you mean by "found", and it depends on what you mean by "record", and it depends on who you ask, and it depends on ....

 

Ah, forget it. The record is 240.

 

Oh, wait ... you want the record for a "midnight to midnight" run? In that case, I don't know.

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It's either 312, 266, 240 or 1. It depends on how you set the criteria.

 

This subject can be quite the hornets nest.

 

Yep, until Guinness gets involved it can be anything you want it to be. :lol:

 

THere was a phony record claimed at Geowoodstock IV, I say phony because it involved a bunch of cheating by a group (or was at two groups :blink: ) that really did not care about the guideline/rules.

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I am planning a caching blitz on our state capital city in the next 2 weeks. Planning is well underway, with the intention of beating Queenslands one day cache record of 52. Our national record, previously 73, has in the last couple of days been blown away as it now stands at 101 finds for one 24 hour period. So, this begs the question. What is the world record for most caches found in one 24 hour period (midnight to midnight)? Cheers Bundy

 

As you can tell from the previous posts, this is a hot-topic issue here in the forums.

 

A few months back, in the week prior to GeoWoodstock IV, a group of international cachers, teamed up and made a 24 hour run of more than 300 caches, and claimed the new world record.

 

In the ensuing weeks, it came to light that the group did not stay together, but split up to find caches simultaneously, and also in some instances, just signed the outside of the container. (Presumably to save time from actually opening the container and signing the log book.)

 

In the end, they did find over 300 caches. Also, since there isn't a set of rules on geocaching.com governing what rules there are for setting a record, it is difficult or impossible to actually have a record at all.

 

Your question, though well intentioned, is probably going to give you more opinions that you really expected. :blink:

 

In the end, have fun, and go out and set your own personal record!

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It's either 312, 266, 240 or 1. It depends on how you set the criteria.

 

This subject can be quite the hornets nest.

 

Yep, until Guinness gets involved it can be anything you want it to be. :lol:

 

THere was a phony record claimed at Geowoodstock IV, I say phony because it involved a bunch of cheating by a group (or was at two groups :o ) that really did not care about the guideline/rules.

 

I disagree. Their record is and always will be their record. There's nothing phony about it.

 

There are NO record attempt guidlines. In other words, it's your lie and you can make it as big as you want.

 

I gave away 13,000 caches at GW4. Now THAT has to be some kinda geocaching record. :):blink:

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As noted it is a contentious topic!

 

A team at GeoWoodstock III in Jacksonville Florida last year found 240 in 24 hours, which was considered by most to be the record.

 

I led a team the week before GeoWoodstock IV in Dallas this year, which included the previous record-holder, and we found 312 with 42 DNF (using a 2-minute time limit), so a total of 356 cache hunts in 24 hours.

 

We did split up at times, and approximately 30 of those finds were by members who we dropped off, once on a long bridge and once on a walking trail, while we in the van went after others.

 

Further, we chose to sign the outside of some containers with a Sharpie pen so that we didn't have to take the time to dig out the logsheet.

 

Both of these practices were soundly rejected by the geocaching community and we decided to apologize to the cache owners and not claim it as a record. In fact I don't think any of us even logged the caches - I don't log caches anyway and the team decided not to because of the stink raised in these forums.

 

Record or not, the fact is that 4 Germans and 4 Americans spent 24 solid hours in a van hunting geocaches and actually found, if you take the 312 find total and subtract the 30 we were not together for, 282 caches.

 

Again, let's not start any wars here over the number because we are not claiming any record... as far as we are concerned 241 beats the previous 240 record and will make you the new world-record holder!

 

As to it being a world-record at all, there is no set of rules or verification process, so it's only a record if the community accepts it as such.

 

A group contacted me last month about duplicating our effort but doing it 'legally' (all cachers together, sign all logs) and I sent them our route and cache data. I have not heard if they actually tried it.

 

Good luck with your attempt!

Ed

Edited by TheAlabamaRambler
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My record for most found is 13...

 

my record for most found with my 4 year old son is 6...

 

my record for most found on a work-day is 2 (record for most found on a work day when I was playing hookey is 5)...

 

my record for most found on a day when I tipped a canoe over in a snowstorm and later got lost and hiked 15-20 miles up and down mountains in the high peaks wilderness is 2...

 

My record for most caches found on a perfect day to drink umbrella drinks and swim occasionally in a perfect-blue sea by a snow white beach in Anguilla is 1...

 

I enjoyed all of them...

 

Jamie - NFA

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Ok, Fair enough, I see from the responses over the last hour since I posted the original question that its open to interpretation.

Try this one then, I will quantify my question. The record for 2 people in 1 vehicle with 1 gps. No groups, no multiple GPS's no...., OH forget it. I regret asking.

I'm sorry that you regret asking! This has been an informative and civil thread. Kudos to everyone. :lol:

 

Just go out there and have fun and do your best. :blink:

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No regrets please. It's a question that looms in everyone's mind when they start caching. It's also good for those who have been here awhile to look back at thier knowledge and experiences in a new light.

 

Most will agree that the most important criteria in geocaching is the "fun factor" if you had more fun than everyone else, then it was great day. Even if it was only one cache.

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I was one of two cachers who found 240 caches in 24 hours from 10:00 am July 4, 2004 to 10:00 am July 5, 2004. That explains the 240 number that popped up in an earlier post.

 

From the time when someone first posted about this cache run, the conditions were disclosed. A local driver and navigator planned the route and drove to the caches. Other than that, all customary caching procedures applied. Finds were unassisted, the team stayed together, and each log was signed in ink, on the log, no stickers. Well, except for the virtuals. I signed the statues and historic markers with a sharpie. :blink:

 

I think that so long as you disclose the conditions, it's fine to talk about a record. The most solo finds record is of interest to me... I have seen valid claims in excess of 100 caches in one day. That is quite an achievement. My best is around 50 caches in 24 hours, unassisted. But I've never tried to push for a maximum number under solo conditions.

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I've always been fond of the Team Rebellion record run done in Jacksonville Fl sometime between GW2 and GW3. Mostly because they had no local driver or guide. Three guys from Ocala did a lot of advanced planning, drove up, I believe spent the night, cached for 24 hours then drove home. They acknowledge that the safety/intelligence of the return drive AFTER 24 hours of caching was somewhat questionable. But nobody died. I'm sorry, I don't remember their found or DNF numbers - something over 240 on the finds, and a lot of DNFs.

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Ok, Fair enough, I see from the responses over the last hour since I posted the original question that its open to interpretation.

Try this one then, I will quantify my question. The record for 2 people in 1 vehicle with 1 gps. No groups, no multiple GPS's no...., OH forget it. I regret asking.

I actually took the time to look at your profile. It seems you are relatively new to Geocaching, and have interesting hides already. :lol:

 

In that context, you should ignore us cynics talking about cheating. 100+ finds solo or 200+ finds as a team in 24 hours is considered an achievement, but it's highly dependent on cache density of where you plan to go. And you already seem to know that planning in advance is very important.

 

If you make the attempt, let us know how you did. However, it's probably more important and relevant to share this with the locals. :blink:

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The "keep your own record" method is the right track, but coming here to announce what your record is and the criteria you used for setting that record is noteworthy too.

 

The degree to which others might credit your record is indicative of how the community (or at the very least the forum-commenting community) feels. It's clear that a larger faction of the community did not approve of the criteria used by TAR than the criteria used by the Leprechauns or the Gorilla-cacher team that first announced one of these 100+ 24h efforts.

 

For example, if someone said "I've set the record at 432 caches" but their criteria was not to finish within 24 hours, then most people here will acknowledge the 432 in a short period of time, but not give it good consideration for a "daily" record in their minds. It's a simple example where one of the terms/conditions is mostly defined simply by the words chosen to describe the record, but it can be applied to more broad/grey areas of community acceptance of a record attempt.

 

Until a group of cachers takes it upon themselves to setup a common set of rules that most of the community seems to like and encourages people to be king of the hill, it'll just be community acceptance that determines how "great" your attempt is compared to other attempts in the eyes of others.

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It does all depend on how you do it for sure. I found 100 caches in 11 hours. I was with a local who knew the area and knew most of those caches. I still found them, even recovering one that rolled down a hill and got it back in place. I claim no record, but I do claim to have had one heck of a fun day doing it.

 

Many thanks from me to JoGPS for taking the time to run me around that day. You are a gem my friend.

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The answer is 42.

 

<snip>

 

(wonders if Im the only one that caught this)

No, the rest of us have learned to ignore him. :(:(

Don't ignore him. wimseyguy helped me set a record in North Carolina just as JoGPS and Scoot the Frog helped in Nashville.

 

I am proud to announce my personal best day for DNF's. Thanks to my local guide on a Labor Day Weekend personal record run, I claim DNF's on 11 caches where I hunted with a team and did not sign the log.

 

That wimseyguy is a freakin' MACHINE, I tell you.

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my record for most found on a day when I tipped a canoe over in a snowstorm and later got lost and hiked 15-20 miles up and down mountains in the high peaks wilderness is 2...

Jamie - NFA

My record for the most found on a day when I tipped the canoe over was 20. But it wasn't quite a snow storm, although it was snowing/sleeting and the creek was frozen a few yards away and I fell in the water waist-deep twenty yards from a huge river. And then I had to ride across the creek in the canoe anyway and walk up a 17% grade for 3/4 miles. But I wasn't lost, in fact, I found some new friends that day. Is that some kind of record?

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my record for most found on a day when I tipped a canoe over in a snowstorm and later got lost and hiked 15-20 miles up and down mountains in the high peaks wilderness is 2...

Jamie - NFA

My record for the most found on a day when I tipped the canoe over was 20. But it wasn't quite a snow storm, although it was snowing/sleeting and the creek was frozen a few yards away and I fell in the water waist-deep twenty yards from a huge river. And then I had to ride across the creek in the canoe anyway and walk up a 17% grade for 3/4 miles. But I wasn't lost, in fact, I found some new friends that day. Is that some kind of record?

 

DANG! Mine is 16 at THIS awesome canoe event. I didn't go for the last 2 listed on that page. I was DONE cachin after better than 20 miles of paddling.

 

Lots of cool pictures.

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Back in the olden days when I started geocaching (we cached from our covered wagons). Cache density was not like it is now. I was in the top ten some time with 26 finds. This was less then a 24 hour period, it was more like 16 hours. we covered more than 250 miles driving to find the caches and since there were no micros back then we found all the caches we were looking for even though the last couple we by flashlight. The important thing was that we had a ball.

 

B)

 

ps. Gas was a bit cheaper then.

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I know this wasn't what the OP asked and i know there isn't an official set of guidelines pertaining to record runs but,, wouldn't you pretty much use the same guidelines for a record run as you would for normal everyday caching? I mean, common sense stuff like:

 

1. Locate the cache.

2. Sign the log.

3. Rehide like found.

4. Team members stay together on each find.

5. Do all this in the prescribed amount of time.

 

I know there are probably a couple of things that need to be addressed that i havn't thought of, but these basics would certainly be a good start. It just doesn't seem like a new set of rules or guidelines would have to be made up for this and i certainly wouldn't think anyone would question the legitimacy of the run if a team did follow the above! B)

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I know this wasn't what the OP asked and i know there isn't an official set of guidelines pertaining to record runs but,, wouldn't you pretty much use the same guidelines for a record run as you would for normal everyday caching? I mean, common sense stuff like:

 

1. Locate the cache.

2. Sign the log.

3. Rehide like found.

4. Team members stay together on each find.

5. Do all this in the prescribed amount of time.

 

I know there are probably a couple of things that need to be addressed that i havn't thought of, but these basics would certainly be a good start. It just doesn't seem like a new set of rules or guidelines would have to be made up for this and i certainly wouldn't think anyone would question the legitimacy of the run if a team did follow the above! B)

"You mean:

1. "we caint count it if we're 'REAL CLOSE' "?

2. "we caint sign the container or the tree next to it"?

3. "we caint leave it set where its at so we dont gotta rehide it"?

4. "we caint say 'ugo here and igo there' "?

5. "maybe can we jist do it on daylight savings time switchover day"?

 

"You mean we caint even trample the Gladiola ("nasturtium") beds"?

"No sir". "You mean..." "Yep, this is Welcome Wagon country!" (reference to old commercial- some oldtimers will likely get it)

 

WHAT FUN IS THAT??!! :D

 

I wonder what is the record for BOGUS finds in 24 hrs?

 

*double-bubble-trouble-brew* (stirring pot) B)B)

Edited by Confucius' Cat
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Ok, Most in a day for me was 20 somthing. But when you figure in the potty stops and IM TIRED MOM, can we eat now? that aint so bad with 5 kids! Plus I do not live in a cache rich area. Well, maybe I do as opposed to someone else, but nothing like a large city would be.

The last cache I went for was my most expensive and best spent day EVER caching. I havent taken my jeep for a ride for 3 years. Poor thing.

I got it back into working order, drove it around for two weeks to make sure it was reliable, then I went on a 4 1/2 terrain challenge. I picked up 4 other caches that day since I was driving by them, but I like to say I spent several hours in low lock 4x4 just for this one I have been waiting over a year to get. The 4 1/2 terrain was spot on, and if my kids were watching the gps closer, they would have noticed that I went two more quite treacherous miles past the cache.

Hands down, funnest cache I have ever done. I have the bruises to prove it.

Anyway, for me, its not HOW many, its the challenge! If only for 1. I know we all play differently.

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The results are in. On Thursday, my 2 daughters and myself found 62 caches (61 regular and 1 virtual) in 20 hrs. This was one GPS (and a satnav) one vehicle, in 20 hrs. This breaks the "record" in Queensland, which previously stood at 52. Travel involved was probably around the 100km. There were about 8 DNFs, as well as quite a few that were not attempted due to terrain and muggles. The previous day saw 10 found on a 600km trip. Today was 13, Hopefully tomorrow brings another 15 for a 4 day total of 100. The logs are not complete as yet, as net access is limited for me while on holidays.

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