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Cache owners should post parking coordinates!


The VanDucks
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We went to an unfamiliar part of our very congested suburban county to look for some geocaches, but the traffic was terrible and we spent more time in the car than actually geocaching. If only the cache owner had posted a place to park, it would have made the day much less frustrating. (You know how your GPS will helpfully tell you you're right at the cache, as you're driving along an interstate with no exit in sight!)

 

I guess the person who hides the cache assumes that everyone will be familiar with his area, but we really need to give parking coordinates for caches in busy urban or suburban areas. It's also very helpful to give the name of the local park if the cache is in a public park, so the seekers can look for a street sign and know where to turn. We use a car GPS while driving, and a handheld GPS and a PDA while out of the car, but none of those electronic tools can tell us where to park to avoid a ticket or a tow if the trail to the cache begins in a neighborhood with restricted or nonexistent public parking. We're hoping to place a few caches of our own soon, and I'm going to have a parking coordinate listed for every one of them!

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For some of my caches, I provide parking coordinates because it reduces the hassle and helps people enjoy the experience of hiking to the geocache, which is why I hid it.

 

For other caches I own, figuring out how to access the cache and park is part of the challenge. I intentionally do not provide parking information, and the cache page hints that some extra map study would be a good idea.

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Not having good parking coords is one of my pet peeves. It's one thing if, like Lep says, it's part of the challenge and I know that from the cache writeup. It's another thing entirely if I'm fighting my way around a strange city, trying to find one tiny way into a place that doesn't violate laws or cross private property. I enjoy hunting for caches, not wasting time looking for legal parking or access to an area.

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I agree that some times it's a great idea to provide parking, and some times perhaps not.

 

For my cache... a puzzle cache, I made the listed coordinates the best place to park.

 

For my next cache (gonna be a multi along a bike/walking trail) I'll probably not list parking coordintes for a couple of reasons. For one I want them to work a bit for it. For two, the lot isn't public. While I seriously doubt there would EVER be trouble, if you list it as a good place to park I think that you kinda make the finder assume that you've checked and it's okay for the general public to park there.

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Guess this is why I carry maps; electronic or paper. If I can't find out how to get there on my own, I pull out the map. And if I see a No Parking sign, I keep driving. I travel on business occasionally and wouldn't think of driving around without a map.

 

To me, the challenge of finding a parking spot is 100 times more fun than trying to grab the micro in the lamppost without being seen. :laughing:

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We went to an unfamiliar part of our very congested suburban county to look for some geocaches, but the traffic was terrible and we spent more time in the car than actually geocaching. If only the cache owner had posted a place to park, it would have made the day much less frustrating. (You know how your GPS will helpfully tell you you're right at the cache, as you're driving along an interstate with no exit in sight!)

 

I guess the person who hides the cache assumes that everyone will be familiar with his area, but we really need to give parking coordinates for caches in busy urban or suburban areas. It's also very helpful to give the name of the local park if the cache is in a public park, so the seekers can look for a street sign and know where to turn. We use a car GPS while driving, and a handheld GPS and a PDA while out of the car, but none of those electronic tools can tell us where to park to avoid a ticket or a tow if the trail to the cache begins in a neighborhood with restricted or nonexistent public parking. We're hoping to place a few caches of our own soon, and I'm going to have a parking coordinate listed for every one of them!

 

Speaking as a cache owner....

 

Your lack of preparation is not my fault or concern.

 

It's YOUR choice to provide parking coords. I'm sure some folks will use those instead of actually reading your cache page.

 

As I stated on a thread, oh, just a few days ago. I'd prefer that folks get vital information about my caches by actually reeeeeeading my cache pages. If there were some problem involved with parking, I would provide coords.

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I agree with some of these posts - finding parking is part of the challenge. Occasionally I'll use the parking coordinates when they are posted but usually I'll just point and go.

 

Same with the park names. I don't really want to look for the park by its name I want to see what happens when I get there. And with auto-routing that can be a bit of an adventure too because the map programs don't usually know where the entrance is.

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I always provide a waypoint for parking and describe the type of parking. Albeit a layby or a paid for area. This information is especially useful for cachers with children in tow or grandparents along for some fresh air. Being able to park easily is a prime concern for me for cache locating - I want to make the caching fun not an urban stress farm.

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Speaking as a cache owner....

 

Your lack of preparation is not my fault or concern.

 

It's YOUR choice to provide parking coords. I'm sure some folks will use those instead of actually reading your cache page.

 

As I stated on a thread, oh, just a few days ago. I'd prefer that folks get vital information about my caches by actually reeeeeeading my cache pages. If there were some problem involved with parking, I would provide coords.

 

I'm starting to think that a large portion cachers are from the "entitlement generation." They expect every cache to have ample parking (with coordinates), someone to show them where the cache is, if they can't find it quick enough. Oh and don't forget, each cache should be a quick park and grab.

 

What ever happened to the thrill of the hunt, and researching each cache before you go? I personally enjoy the challenge of figuring out which is the best route to the cache.

Edited by Kit Fox
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I think finding parking is all a part of the hunt. I really don't need someone to hold my hand and guide me to the parking area. That is what maps and sat photos are for.

 

A quick look at Mapblast or Google maps will give me several possibilities. I can narrow those down by looking at Topozone maps and sat photos on Google Earth. For instance if I see street dead ending near the cache, but there are homes on it, I'll assume that access from that street is unlikely and look for another way.

 

For my own caches I will provide suggested parking coordinates only if I want to direct people off of private property, or try to coax them to approach the cache from a specific direction.

Edited by briansnat
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Speaking as a cache owner....

 

Your lack of preparation is not my fault or concern.

 

It's YOUR choice to provide parking coords. I'm sure some folks will use those instead of actually reading your cache page.

 

As I stated on a thread, oh, just a few days ago. I'd prefer that folks get vital information about my caches by actually reeeeeeading my cache pages. If there were some problem involved with parking, I would provide coords.

 

I'm starting to think that a large portion cachers are from the "entitlement generation." They expect every cache to have ample parking (with coordinates), someone to show them where the cache is, if they can't find it quick enough. Oh and don't forget, each cache should be a quick park and grab.

 

What ever happened to the thrill of the hunt, and researching each cache before you go? I personally enjoy the challenge of figuring out which is the best route to the cache.

 

Yep, i think ya'll both nailed it! This seems to be a growing attitude with many in all aspects of life these days. If it's not given to them or they have to work for it then it's not fair and they want to complain.

 

Parking coordinates aren't a requirement for the cache. They can be helpful but it's up to the cache owner on whether he wants to post them or not. Finding the right place to go in is sometimes part of the challenge! :laughing:

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Speaking as a cache owner....

 

Your lack of preparation is not my fault or concern.

 

It's YOUR choice to provide parking coords. I'm sure some folks will use those instead of actually reading your cache page.

 

As I stated on a thread, oh, just a few days ago. I'd prefer that folks get vital information about my caches by actually reeeeeeading my cache pages. If there were some problem involved with parking, I would provide coords.

 

I'm starting to think that a large portion cachers are from the "entitlement generation." They expect every cache to have ample parking (with coordinates), someone to show them where the cache is, if they can't find it quick enough. Oh and don't forget, each cache should be a quick park and grab.

 

What ever happened to the thrill of the hunt, and researching each cache before you go? I personally enjoy the challenge of figuring out which is the best route to the cache.

 

I like that term, but it makes me think of the younger generation for some reason. :laughing: (Dang young 'uns today. Don't get me started.)

 

It reminds me of one of my most favorite geocaching arguments.

 

It all boils down to NOT taking responsibility for ones own actions and placing convenient blame on the object of their frustration. (I drove around for an hour. It must be the hider's fault. My laser perfect GPSr let me 100+ feet from the cache on a hunt with poor atmospheric conditions, sun spots, and heavy tree cover. It must be the hider's fault that I couldn't find a cache that ANY number of teams had no trouble finding before me.)

 

They DO provide entertainment though. :laughing:

 

High•brow: Of, relating to, or being highly cultured or intellectual: as in- They only attend highbrow events such as the ballet or the opera.

n.

One who possesses or affects a high degree of culture or learning.

 

The geocaching "Highbrow" movement is really perplexing to me. Sometimes it really seems to me that some people actually think EVERY single cache MUST take them to some fantastic place with an exotic view and convenient parking and be filled with precious jewels. If not, well, the cache is just so much more geotrash. (Yea, yea, overstated but still...) Next comes the complaint thread that all caches that don't meet THEIR aesthetic be banned, or some new designation be given them so they can exclude them on their searches.

 

I think of these people as (I'm going to coin terms here, so remember where you heard them): The GPC Club, (for the Geo-Politically correct) and The ARG Club. (The Anal Retentive Geocachers Club.) Some belong to both clubs, but it's the latter that provide the most entertainment.

 

OK, we hear mottos like, "The language of location," and I think some of us take it a bit too literally.

 

Sheesh, this isn't rocket surgery. It's boxes of junk in the woods, or where ever someone sees fit to place one and can get it approved. Since when did EVERY single cache have to have some awesome intrinsic value to be worthwhile?

 

This is still high tech hide and seek. Isn't it? Not high tech, only traditional caches, in beautiful settings, with convenient parking, and sparkling restrooms, hide and seek.... Right? So what difference does it make who, what, when, where and especially why? If an approver found it worthy to be posted then I count myself lucky to have another choice of a cache to hunt, OR NOT to hunt if it doesn't seem like my kind of fun.

 

This is my favorite geocaching quote:

 

"Failure is a hard pill to swallow until you realize the only failure you can really have in this sport is the failure to enjoy yourself."

TotemLake 4/26/04

 

I think I'll go hide some urban micros now....... :D:laughing::rolleyes::):huh::D

 

(BTW- I know it's spelled hoi palloi. That was a playful spelling in the title.)

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I've been on a couple of hunts where parking coordinates were listed for safety, security, and/or convenience issues. I say if it feels good, do it. If parking is extremely limited, hard to find, or parking in a certain place is advisable for safety/security, then go ahead and post the coordinates.

 

One request though... ...some of us use applications to download our waypoints that do NOT process child waypoints well. If you add child waypoints to parking, it's always helpful to us to have them also listed in the description.

 

With that said and with the request aside, cache hiders can do what they feel is appropriate for their cache. I do my research. If there isn't enough information or it looks too difficult for my time, ability, tolerance, etc. I simply won't do it. No skin of my teeth or the cache owner's.

 

A big thanks to all cache hiders and especially those that do go that extra mile to make caching enjoyable for the masses!

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We went to an unfamiliar part of our very congested suburban county to look for some geocaches, but the traffic was terrible and we spent more time in the car than actually geocaching. If only the cache owner had posted a place to park, it would have made the day much less frustrating. (You know how your GPS will helpfully tell you you're right at the cache, as you're driving along an interstate with no exit in sight!)

 

I guess the person who hides the cache assumes that everyone will be familiar with his area, but we really need to give parking coordinates for caches in busy urban or suburban areas. It's also very helpful to give the name of the local park if the cache is in a public park, so the seekers can look for a street sign and know where to turn. We use a car GPS while driving, and a handheld GPS and a PDA while out of the car, but none of those electronic tools can tell us where to park to avoid a ticket or a tow if the trail to the cache begins in a neighborhood with restricted or nonexistent public parking. We're hoping to place a few caches of our own soon, and I'm going to have a parking coordinate listed for every one of them!

Too bad so sad. I disagree with your sentiment to spoon feed every piece of information to find the cache.

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We went to an unfamiliar part of our very congested suburban county to look for some geocaches, but the traffic was terrible and we spent more time in the car than actually geocaching. If only the cache owner had posted a place to park, it would have made the day much less frustrating. (You know how your GPS will helpfully tell you you're right at the cache, as you're driving along an interstate with no exit in sight!)

 

I guess the person who hides the cache assumes that everyone will be familiar with his area, but we really need to give parking coordinates for caches in busy urban or suburban areas. It's also very helpful to give the name of the local park if the cache is in a public park, so the seekers can look for a street sign and know where to turn. We use a car GPS while driving, and a handheld GPS and a PDA while out of the car, but none of those electronic tools can tell us where to park to avoid a ticket or a tow if the trail to the cache begins in a neighborhood with restricted or nonexistent public parking. We're hoping to place a few caches of our own soon, and I'm going to have a parking coordinate listed for every one of them!

I agree. I do this religiously on all our caches, particularly the Psycho caches or wilderness caches where parking safe, sane and legal parking could become a big question.

 

A case in point on failure to tell seekers about parking options: I was recently in Houston, TX, primarily to seek Quantum Leap. However, I found time to seek several other caches in the area as well. I also went after two wilderness caches -- both owned by the same cacher -- located about a 20 mile drive SW of where I was staying. I spent two hours driving again and again around the same 2.5 mile by 2.5 mile by 2 mile by 2 mile rectangle of roads/highways which formed the perimeter of the wilderness area in which the caches were located, futilely looking for safe and sane and legal parking. I could find none (execept for a few obviously illegal muddy pull-off areas), and eventually gave up on my effort to find the cache! The whole effort took over 3 hours out of my day, plus 80 miles of driving!

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The whole effort took over 3 hours out of my day, plus 80 miles of driving!

Not all parks are going to have locations for your car. I can point out some parks in my general area where you're going to have to park a few blocks away and walk to it. Personally, I would have stopped looking for a location to park at the first go around and drove away.

 

Log Note:

DNF due to my inability to find convenient parking.

 

Ergo - I'm not going to blame the the hider for not posting a place to park. I'm going to blame myself for not researching the area well enough before jumping into the unknown because apparently I'm missing something that's obvious. That ladies and gentlemen, is part of the hunt and part of accepting responsibility for your own (yes, your own) actions.

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I provided parking coordinates on my cache primarily because I don't want cachers parking in my driveway, my elderly mother lives with me and she doesn't need to have to wonder who every car that pulls in the driveway is. Plus my dog won't go nuts barking at them. Park where I want and generally even I won't know you're here, complete privacy for all. :anibad:

If a cache doesn't provide them then I'll find a spot or not, it's all part of the game.

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With that said and with the request aside, cache hiders can do what they feel is appropriate for their cache. I do my research. If there isn't enough information or it looks too difficult for my time, ability, tolerance, etc. I simply won't do it. No skin of my teeth or the cache owner's.

 

 

Nicely said. Pretty much sums up geocaching for me - choice of challenge. Nothing compels me to do a cache and I can freely choose not to attempt caches that do not provide coords for parking or any any other vital info. As a cache owner, I can choose to make my cache as accessible as possible, or make it near impossible, either for the challenge or to prove to the rest of the world that I'm smarter than you :anibad:

 

This is similar to another thread suggesting that users should have a minimum number of finds before being able to hide a cache. I can usually tell from other logs whether the cache will be interesting or not. I can check the profile of the owner to judge their experience. I can choose whether to accept the challenge or not.

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I also could care less about parking coordinates. Seems they are a relatively recent addition to cache page input anyway. In the past a few have placed parking coords directly on the page. Nice of them but I think the hunt starts at my door not at whatever parking coordinate is posted. I learned about autorouting that way. "Why am I all of a sudden driving in circles .5mi from the cache?" OH yea ya dummy find a place to park and walk-- DUH!!!!!! After that I did my homework before I left home. And yes, about 30-50% of the time, by doing some homework, I can park with better access to the cache than the posted parking coords. All part of the discovery process. :anibad:

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I ignore parking coordinates and use my GPS to find the nearest place where I can legally (sometimes) park. Hate to say it, but there are many caches in south Florida with parking coordinates and a nice .5 to 1 mile walk along a hiking trail -- where I have found a way to get to the cache from about 100 ft from my car, going over various obstacles including, but not limited to, barbed wire fences, downed trees, extremely dense patches of palmetto, etc.

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I guess I see the parking directions kind of like the clues. some people would like them, others don't. If they are provided, people can choose whether to use them or not.

 

I was on a cache a while ago that made me question my fondness for this hobby... I was at this cache site, just a beautiful remote spot in the woods. Absolutely georgeous... then I get near the cache, and the whole area was trampled. There were a bunch of plants and some mushrooms ... just trashed dead with pieces lying all about. And coming from the other side of the cache were 5 or 6 bushwhacked trails right through the plants. People just trampling their own way through the wildlife even though there already was a pre-existing path that went almost all the way to the cache. (and then in the logs they complain about the nettles)

 

The same thing goes with parking, not only could it cut down on the amount of damage to cache sites if everyone went the same way instead of trailblazing a new path for each person, but the amount of backlash from non-geocachers who aren't thrilled that people are parking in front of their driveway or shortcutting through their yards could be reduced as well.

 

who knows. I think geocaching is great. and I can appreciate that people don't want hints. I just hate to see the downside of sending so many people into places that are special specifically because they haven't been ruined by heavy traffic, and seeing those people do maximum amounts of damage instead of taking the same or limited routes because they all started in different places for no good reason.

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We've given definitive parking locations with street names and GPS co'ords for those parking locations on the caches we maintain, posted photos of the parking spot and yet we STILL read logs that say things like "ignored POSTED signs and had to bushwack over barbed wire fence and fend off junkyard dogs but still found the cache...". I mean, SHEESH, some folks read nothing but the co'ords you post for the cache. They don't read the cache description or any of the logs the other cachers post. Go figure :ph34r: . :o

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Surely the easiest compromise is for a cache owner to provide parking coords (maybe two - the Nearest and the Pleasant Hike option) and then you have a choice of whether to use them or not.

 

It doesn't hurt to provide the information and let the cachers decide how difficult they want the overall challenge to be?

 

:o

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Sounds like it's one of those subjective matter of opinion. With a cache you've got GPS coordinates that almost take you straight to it.. the challenge (to my mind) is finding the cache itself at 'ground zero', far more than the lesser challenge of getting there. Bear in mind I'm on an island of 40 square miles that's small enough to know so well it's no problem knowing how to get about. I suppose my outlook may change if I ever have the chance to hunt caches in an unfamiliar area... but even so I just consider parking assistance to be a courtesy to help cachers get into the right area to START the search. I've never considered the driving part of the hunt before... but maybe it is :)

 

It all hinges upon that.. is the drive there part of the hunt, or does it start when you're on foot? Subjective, isn't it?

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I don't provide them and I do not expect you to either. I've got a satellite reciever in my hand with maps. It will get me close enough most of the time where I can make my own decision on where to park. I suppose in some remote back country areas where the trailheads are hard to spot or poorly marked I would appreciate them, but for your average suburban hunt, I'm not likely to even read your cache page if it is a traditional hide until I'm logging my find/DNF.

 

It's supposed to be about finding your way, isn't it? :)

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I agree. I do this religiously on all our caches, particularly the Psycho caches or wilderness caches where parking safe, sane and legal parking could become a big question.

 

Aww, face it Vinny, your caches involve wimpy stuff like climbing abandoned bridge pillars, delving into radioactive waste sites, spelunking in sewers, and hanging from old railway trestles above a lethal drop. None of these things poses the manly challenge of denying seekers info on local parking. I mean, nothing gets the testosterone surging like driving around looking at no trespassing signs and resisting the urge to just jump the wall and be done with it.

 

And I've evidentally missed out on some advance in mapping technology that reveals the property ownership status of terrain features. Time to upgrade!

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Although I can understand the frustration caching in unfamiliar territory, parking coordinates are something cache owners SHOULD keep in mind. However, I don't believe parking coordinates are something cache seekers are entitled to. As some have mentioned research could be done on many caches to save on time/effort/headaches/burning gas. Some cache owners have spent a lot of time and effort in hiding their caches. Posting parking coordinates takes some of the fun/mystery out of finding a cache. I feel this is true especially for puzzle caches.

 

Cache seekers should be entitled an accurate set of coordinates to the cache, while cache owners should be reasonable in maintaining their caches.

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Although I can understand the frustration caching in unfamiliar territory, parking coordinates are something cache owners SHOULD keep in mind. However, I don't believe parking coordinates are something cache seekers are entitled to. As some have mentioned research could be done on many caches to save on time/effort/headaches/burning gas. Some cache owners have spent a lot of time and effort in hiding their caches. Posting parking coordinates takes some of the fun/mystery out of finding a cache. I feel this is true especially for puzzle caches.

 

Cache seekers should be entitled an accurate set of coordinates to the cache, while cache owners should be reasonable in maintaining their caches.

 

Absolutely, there are exceptions. And nobody's entitled to anything other than a set of coords. But the concept of withholding access info to 'increase the challenge' strikes me as pathetic. That's your challenge? Cul-de-sacs, one-way streets, aggressive meter maids, no-trespassing signs? Come on, those things aren't challenges, they're annoyances. Give me a cache that makes me sweat, makes me bleed, but spare me the tough talk about parking as a 'challenge.'

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Although I can understand the frustration caching in unfamiliar territory, parking coordinates are something cache owners SHOULD keep in mind. However, I don't believe parking coordinates are something cache seekers are entitled to. As some have mentioned research could be done on many caches to save on time/effort/headaches/burning gas. Some cache owners have spent a lot of time and effort in hiding their caches. Posting parking coordinates takes some of the fun/mystery out of finding a cache. I feel this is true especially for puzzle caches.

 

Cache seekers should be entitled an accurate set of coordinates to the cache, while cache owners should be reasonable in maintaining their caches.

 

Absolutely, there are exceptions. And nobody's entitled to anything other than a set of coords. But the concept of withholding access info to 'increase the challenge' strikes me as pathetic. That's your challenge? Cul-de-sacs, one-way streets, aggressive meter maids, no-trespassing signs? Come on, those things aren't challenges, they're annoyances. Give me a cache that makes me sweat, makes me bleed, but spare me the tough talk about parking as a 'challenge.'

 

Tough talk? :)

 

Seriously though, i've been to many a cache where it was more fun (sometimes more frustrating) just figuring out how to get to the cache area. I have to say that those tend to be some of the more memorable caches too! :D

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Tough talk? :)

 

Seriously though, i've been to many a cache where it was more fun (sometimes more frustrating) just figuring out how to get to the cache area. I have to say that those tend to be some of the more memorable caches too! :D

 

Wow. OK. You've got me there. I do mostly remote caches--mountaintops in particular--and when I do try an urban cache, the parking/access issues are a supreme irritant and huge time waster--particularly if they're a surprise. I find it hard to imagine that anybody enjoys being thwarted by fences, signs, and one-ways, but muggles I've told about Geocaching don't get it, either.

 

The thought I still have, which is not invalidated by the differences between hiders and seekers, is that it wouldn't hurt anybody to consider the other guy. If a DNF or note will give useful info to the hider, then provide it. If there's no good reason not to give parking coords or a heads-up about access restrictions, do it. The 'tough talk' I referred to was the response I got in the related thread, 'It's their responsibility--let them figure it out.'

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Absolutely, there are exceptions. And nobody's entitled to anything other than a set of coords. But the concept of withholding access info to 'increase the challenge' strikes me as pathetic. That's your challenge? Cul-de-sacs, one-way streets, aggressive meter maids, no-trespassing signs? Come on, those things aren't challenges, they're annoyances. Give me a cache that makes me sweat, makes me bleed, but spare me the tough talk about parking as a 'challenge.'

 

 

ALMOST EVERY "annoyance" you've listed can be eliminated IF cache seekers did a little homework BEFORE going to a cache. Turn by turn routing GPSes, Thomas Guides, AAA Maps, keeping a stack of coins for meters, parking a little farther away, etc... pretty much eliminates most of these "annoyances".

 

I find it incredible that you would gladly do a cache that requires a decent hike, but get worked up over having to do a minor bit of prep work to grab an urban cache.

 

/sarcasm on

 

I just did this cache up in Yosemite... it was a 12 mile hike round trip!!! It would have been helpful if the cache owner could have posted coordinates for:

 

Parking

Trail Head

Sources of Water (natural and man made)

Places where hikers could take a break and rest in the shade

Places where I'm allowed to go to the bathroom...

 

/sarcasm off

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Wow. OK. You've got me there. I do mostly remote caches--mountaintops in particular--and when I do try an urban cache, the parking/access issues are a supreme irritant and huge time waster--particularly if they're a surprise. I find it hard to imagine that anybody enjoys being thwarted by fences, signs, and one-ways, but muggles I've told about Geocaching don't get it, either.

 

The thought I still have, which is not invalidated by the differences between hiders and seekers, is that it wouldn't hurt anybody to consider the other guy. If a DNF or note will give useful info to the hider, then provide it. If there's no good reason not to give parking coords or a heads-up about access restrictions, do it. The 'tough talk' I referred to was the response I got in the related thread, 'It's their responsibility--let them figure it out.'

 

Some will see this as part of the challenge, others will see it as an annoyance. Some think that the cache hunt begins when they punch "goto" into their GPSR and take off for the cache. Others think that the cache hunt doesn't begin until after the engine is shut off and they are within 100 feet of the cache. I'm guessing that these two ways of thinking probably have a bearing on whether a person believes there should be parking coords or not.

 

I agree that there are times when giving parking coordinates may be warranted to help make the cache more enjoyable and to alleviate problems and headaches. For the majority of caches though, they aren't. Getting there is part of the hunt as far as i'm concerned.

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seems that the times I've been most annoyed with lack of parking, the cache has been a complete dud anyway.

 

probably a good idea to skip the cache if there is no parking, because the person who placed it most likely either doesn't know, or doesn't care about what they are doing.

Your litmus test as to whether a cache is good is if there is easy parking nearby? Ummm, OK. Welcome to the wonderful world of light pole and dumpster caches.

 

 

(I bet many of you are surprised to see this comment coming from me.) :)

Edited by sbell111
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For some of my caches, I provide parking coordinates because it reduces the hassle and helps people enjoy the experience of hiking to the geocache, which is why I hid it.

 

For other caches I own, figuring out how to access the cache and park is part of the challenge. I intentionally do not provide parking information, and the cache page hints that some extra map study would be a good idea.

 

<echo>what he said</echo>

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There are some good responses here, and I can agree in part with both sides. There seems to be a very fine line between what is considered a good and bad here, and I know it all boils down to personal preference.

 

I have not had the opportunity to do any urban caches yet, which is why I am commenting here. Several of the caches I have done are located on or near private property. This past weekend I did a multicache where the given coordinates were the hint, which was visible from the road with binoculars or by a short walk down a hill (about 30 feet). The actual cache was about 3/4 of a mile away. I drove around the "block" (1/2 mile x 1 mile rectangle) trying to get closer. I saw a potential road, but it was marked with No Tresspassing signs. So I drove around to the other side. I could swear that it was the same road that I was walking down, just without the signs and not as maintained. This is one instance in which I feel parking coordinates should be provided. It's a state owned hunting and fishing area, and if you park in the wrong area, the state DNR will ask you to move. And if you're not near your vehicle, it gets towed.

 

Recovering my car from the impound lot is not my idea of fun...

 

Then you get to the issue of "4X4s can make it to within a hundred feet of the cache. Cars can park at the substation and walk 1/4 mile." That's another issue all together....

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seems that the times I've been most annoyed with lack of parking, the cache has been a complete dud anyway.

 

probably a good idea to skip the cache if there is no parking, because the person who placed it most likely either doesn't know, or doesn't care about what they are doing.

Your litmus test as to whether a cache is good is if there is easy parking nearby? Ummm, OK. Welcome to the wonderful world of light pole and dumpster caches.

 

(I bet many of you are surprised to see this comment coming from me.) :huh:

Without going into details I agree with Bad CRC. While I am not the most experienced cacher in the world by a long shot, in my limited experience caches with no posted parking coords in areas where there is no obvious legal parking have been duds. By duds I mean a crappy, non weatherproof container, hidden in a non clever way and containing nothing unsuitable for CITO in an area that isn't in any way worth visiting for it's own sake.

 

I have done a couple caches where the cache page indicated that finding where to park would be a little challenging. Those were fine and the most recent one was simply a newly developed area where neither my GPSr software nor google maps showed any of the roads yet.

 

Your mileage may vary.

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