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Do you remember your significant finds?


hikemeister
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I remember in vivid detail my 100th find -- a full size cache hidden in a huge log covered with ferns in a forest west of Sebring, Florida. It was late AM, my son was along, and I was teaching a group of Boy Scouts how to do orienteering and geocaching. In contrast, without looking at the records, I have no idea what cache was #200, #300, #400, #500 or #600...perhaps when I get to #1000 I will take a photo or something.

 

Anyway, is this common? Do most of you (or few of you) keep track of your signficant finds?

 

Is it common for #100 to be very special? More so that #500?

 

Am I just a whacko or did I get bored after 100?

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With my milestones, I try to choose something on the hiking side. 500 was the exception...Rocket Power...during the Yak cache machine in 03. Already found by someone else. All the others, including my latest, are very memorable.

 

My first ever FTF up back of North Bend. What a story that one was...last run with my old truck which literally failed on me as I got home. "Aren't you feeling lucky you punk" was name of the cache or something like that. Thing had been planted almost a whole year before.

 

Find Number 1 was videotaped over two trips. LOL. First time out, I didn't enter the coords right and guessed at teh cache area. Second time out, it was smoother sailing.

 

Number 100th was one of Moun10Bike's legendary Leonardo series. Cache 4 of the series. Too bad they aren't around anymore. Classics!!!!

 

So yeah, I remember a lot of my finds...most milestones, some FTFs, and other caches that proved to be very significant. E.g. My first St. Helens climb. Did that one solo and had the whole place to myself for over an hour. Io Zob or whatever was a virtual cache that required a 14-plus mile, 4400 ft elevation gain. Incredible hike and FTF.

 

Well, it depends on what you chose for your milestones I think. Mine typically were hikes or special caches in general. If you had your milestones on lame city caches, perhaps it's easier to forget them.

Edited by evergreenhiker!
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I think you are right -- when I found #500 it was on a cache run with some friends and we did about 30 that day, mostly easy urban micros.

 

Like others, I remember very well the special caches -- challenging long hikes with great hides -- Red Scorpion, just north of Jupiter, Florida may be the best of all, or Devil of a Hike in the Niagara River gorge...or was it that cache in Tuscany Italy (Tuscan View)...anyway I guess numbers no longer are so important, and the best memories are of caches not how many found.

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I remember all of my finds. I can picture the location, container, everything. I guess that's easy when you don't have a whole lot of finds

 

I'm not that good - I can remember about 90% of the ones I've found - you know it's bad when you drive by an "area" and the kids remind me that a cache is over there

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I definately remember all of my significant finds. They keep getting bigger and better. I'm trying to get my wife used to the idea of flying all the way to Washington State to just to log Mission 9: Tunnel of Light, for find #1000.

 

I skip most 1/1 caches, so it is going to take me quite awhile to reach this goal.

 

1st find, Out on a Limb, by Team Perks (GCHHBX)

100th find, Governor Mine, by GarminArmin (GCF263)

200th find, Follow The Drinking Gourd, by Team Perks (GCJ3K0)

300th find, Another Vista Point, by GarminArmin (GCBD3E)

400th find, Geo Tax, by Team Perks (GCJRKG)

500th find, Antelope Valley Poppies & Pizza Event, by GarminArmin (GCN4KB)

600th find, Burnt Offering, by Big Steve Maintained by Big Bad Trucker (GC55F)

700th find, Scouting's Highest Honour - Mt. Baden-Powell, by showbizkid (GCH7GY)

800th find, The Dragonfly Scroll by Snapplez (GC7F3A)

900th find, Return to Scab Island by Snapplez (GC2CE4)

Edited by Kit Fox
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I don't remember our hundredth find, I think because it was in the middle of an urban power caching spree. In Orange County, California, we have the Bikencache series, which is quite a long stretch of tightly packed caches, so somewhere in the middle of all of that was number one-hundred. Number two hundred was very memorable, because we had to reach it by a very long, rough dirt road with a car not built for that kind of terrain. It was technically an FTF also, with beta testers. It was the only day we've ever been FTF. That and some others had been sitting along that road without any first finds for about a month before we got there. Two others lay beyond our 200th find, but we could not get to them do to the worsening condition of the road and an oncoming thunderstorm. I believe they still have yet to get official FTFs (not counting the beta testers).

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I definately remember all of my significant finds. They keep getting bigger and better. I'm trying to get my wife used to the idea of flying all the way to Washington State to just to log Mission 9: Tunnel of Light, for find #1000.

 

I skip most 1/1 caches, so it is going to take me quite awhile to reach this goal.

 

1st find, Out on a Limb, by Team Perks (GCHHBX)

100th find, Governor Mine, by GarminArmin (GCF263)

200th find, Follow The Drinking Gourd, by Team Perks (GCJ3K0)

300th find, Another Vista Point, by GarminArmin (GCBD3E)

400th find, Geo Tax, by Team Perks (GCJRKG)

500th find, Antelope Valley Poppies & Pizza Event, by GarminArmin (GCN4KB)

600th find, Burnt Offering, by Big Steve Maintained by Big Bad Trucker (GC55F)

700th find, Scouting's Highest Honour - Mt. Baden-Powell, by showbizkid (GCH7GY)

800th find, The Dragonfly Scroll by Snapplez (GC7F3A)

900th find, Return to Scab Island by Snapplez (GC2CE4)

 

I remember most of my finds. Probably takes a strange mind to to that. If we're in the neighborhood, can probably lead you to most of them without GPS. I do not remember most of the benchmark numbers. I'm sure that I have a list somewhere. (900 coming up in a week or so...)

First find is indelibly etched in my mind. I had a GPS, and read about geocaching, and I went searching for:

Terrace Pond (GC3076) by briansnat. Great cache! The bellweather for all other caches. So, you all have Brian to blame for my presence here!

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Number 1 - OH, YEAH!!! When I found that first ammo can just sitting there in the hollow tree and nobody the wiser I was hooked big time. I'll never forget that one. Number 100 -- YES! It was a very important thing to me and I chose a cache I thought worthy of the event. I remember the day, the weather, the hike, finding the cache, reading ALL of the logs, the view, the sunlight, the unexpected Indian Head Penny I traded for, what I left in exchange, ALL of it. It was awesome. (Well, the poison oak I stupidly got by being an idiot wasn't all that great but.......)

 

My 500th find was also planned. I did a local night cache and I had saved it for my milestone. I had only done one other night-only cache and I had loved it so I saved this one for a special occasion. I went with my wife and, while the cache was easy and a fairly short walk through the woods at night, it was still special to me.

 

200, 300, 400, 600, just kind of happened as I went along. I can tell you though that #1 and #100 will always stay with me. I was a n00b and it totally rocked to find my firrst cache and then later to hit 100. :laughing::rolleyes::ph34r:

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I remember the first one...it was like s.. the first time, almost surreal...made me happy

 

100...3 part multi...a beautiful creek hidden in the woods...gorgeous

 

500...found this one with the Mrs. on a hike after work in the rain..it belonged to my best geo-buddy...those three meant the most to me.

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I remember most, probably not all. I do try to do something special for milestones. For example, my last milestone was spur of the moment, but I timed it out so it would be my first cache in Canada. I like making milestone caches special.

 

Bookmark lists are great for featuring the best ones you have found. You see mine linked in my signature line.

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I remember caches by the things that happened along the way, or the things I traded, or the neat container, or the great company...Sometimes I remember the name, but I have this bizarre form of dyslexia that often makes me forget names or confuse them.

 

But surely no one was suggesting that anyone should remember what cache number 427 was like? If so, count me out---I was the kid that hated it when the history teacher wanted me to memorize a list of dates...I was much more interested in what event led up to the Revolutionary War or what caused the Civil War, than which exact date they began. I was happy enough to be able to put things into a general order and leave the dates in the books to be looked up if needed.

 

I am able to remember things like the day we did a dozen plus caches around one pretty local park I had never visited before. AT one point, we walked along the stream to get to the first part of a multi, and I saw a shack on the far side just before we went up the hill. At the top, there were the remnants of this wonderful old bridge of stone, and we found the cache in a most unusual container. The clues led us across where the bridge used to pass, but the water was up and the shallow place in the stream wasn't shallow that day, so I'll have to go back another day. In the same park, there was a cache with a big container with dozens of smaller ones inside--only one of which held the log. There was a huge old ammo can hidden in an unusual pile of sticks---in small copse where every tree sported an unusual pile of sticks.

 

Another cache had the most unusual container I have yet seen, and surprise--make that two identical of the most unusual containers I have ever seen because one had been misplaced and the owner replaced it (so we picked up the first one to take to him at an event that weekend). The first cache we did that day was hidden in a wall of tiny caves and I never did find it. The last cache we did that day was near a model airplane flying field. There was one in an old building foundation that was a bit tricky, but another in a tree that was easy to get to and easy to find.

 

One cache was near a dog run, and was full of great things for the kiddies, another by it was just outside an old mental hospital cemetery with the most lovely tombstones (unfortunately the gates were locked, so I couldn't look at them as closely as I would have liked. One was in the steps of the old hospital, now just a ruin of old foundtaions, and I'm not sure we approached it like we were supposed to, as it seemed to me we walked the long, long, long way around to get there. It had exactly the same trade items in it as three other caches in that part of the park. They were all ammo cans, and the several traders before us had left a miniture flag, a small flag button, an alien, a blue marble, and a pencil with a team caching name. And that was swag from five different cachers who went there on five different days---so I was surprised to find identical swag in thr three caches.

 

I can't tell you the number of any of the caches, or even approximately where they fell in our cache record--four hundreds? three hundreds? I dunno or care. But it was a warm day, a pretty day, and a day that my back was cooperating nicely, thank you! I had a great time, and I really ought to go back and find that second stage of that darn multi now that the water will be down.

 

Hey, thanks for giving me a reason to recall that day!

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It's a combination of circumstances that make a cache memorable. A late Spring evening on the Sussex Levels, with a die for glory-scene sunset, perfumed air from wild flowers, a charming stone bridge over a crystal trout stream - retrieving a cache modelled on a fairytale Troll.

 

Now if it had been pi55ing down with rain with a cold Northerly blasting out earwax, the charming character cache would have seemed a cheap movie prop hidden down a slimy slope under a span that dripped cold water down my neck.

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IAnyway, is this common? Do most of you (or few of you) keep track of your signficant finds?

 

Is it common for #100 to be very special? More so that #500?

 

I enjoy the century marks. I timed our 600th to be at The Original Stash Tribute Plaque, the site of the first geocache placement (known as stashes in those days). Mostly though, they are just the ones that happened to be in my path at a specific moment in time. Century caches, no matter which individual cache they turn out to be, are significant to me and I list them on our profile page. It's just for fun.

 

Up until cache number 600 I could remember every one of them. I could recite hiding details, location, type of container. But after that they started getting fuzzy. Many I still recall very clearly but there are litterally hundreds now that I have absolutely no memory of. But each one was fun at the time even if a large lot of them were only a teany tiny bit fun.

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I hope that I never find so many that I cannot remember them for something. #100, #88 and #390 were just as special to me because somebody took the time to place something there and share a bit of thier world with me. Yes some are more special than others but milestone caches are never picked to be extra special.

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I remember in vivid detail my 100th find -- a full size cache hidden in a huge log covered with ferns in a forest west of Sebring, Florida. It was late AM, my son was along, and I was teaching a group of Boy Scouts how to do orienteering and geocaching. In contrast, without looking at the records, I have no idea what cache was #200, #300, #400, #500 or #600...perhaps when I get to #1000 I will take a photo or something.

 

Anyway, is this common? Do most of you (or few of you) keep track of your signficant finds?

 

Is it common for #100 to be very special? More so that #500?

 

Am I just a whacko or did I get bored after 100?

 

I remember #100, #1000, and I'm close to 2000 which I will also remember.

More than these, though, I remember great locations and container/presentations.

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I remember most of my finds, sometimes it takes something to trigger that memory tho. The milestones I remember better, but that's because I pick specific caches for them usually. In the minority are ones where I could tell you this cache was that number.

I've been putting the cache find number in my logs pretty much from day 1. It is neat to look back at some to see where I was in finds at that time.

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I can tell you my milestones because I use GSAK and it is fairly easy to figure out and I have them listed in my profile, however I could not tell you any of them except my first, Working Public..

 

Besides being memorable for the obvious reason, it was somewhat comedic in how we found it. I had a GPSs that we used mostly on our motorcycles for traveling and had not had much more of a use for them. I had found GCing while looking up some other things for my GPS and had printed out a page or two to look at when I got a chance.

 

They sat in my back seat for a month or two when BD happened to look at one while we were out and asked about it. We realized that it was close and decided to go look for it. As we pulled up I grabbed a FRS radio out of the compartment and told BD that I had heard that occasionally GCers used them while out. She rolled her eyes and looked at me. I felt foolish and put it back. We both agreed the likely hood of someone being here at this exact time was slim to none.

 

As we walked back to the first stage (yea, it was a multi) we saw a man and his son walking the opposite direction. Dang, this must be more popular than we thought!. We found it and even though it had many elements that beginners sometimes find discouraging (Puzzle, multi, bushwacking) we were hooked.

 

Hows that for a memory.

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I plan on making #1000 a very special one -- not some lame micro, but a real cache somewhere with a memorable hike. The only problem is that at the rate I am going, it will be a long time! We need to move again, because within a year of the last move, went from about 400 to 650 real fast, then about tapped out with all the local caches. If you have a job it is not so easy to travel and find large numbers of caches.

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I vividly remember all my significant finds - the climbs to the tops of mountains, treks through tunnels, pipes and caves, beautiful views, a Project Ape cache, the southwestern most cache in the continental USA, the oldest cache in my state, you name it, I remember them all. But none of those memories have anything whatsoever to do with numbers.

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I remember in vivid detail my 100th find -- a full size cache hidden in a huge log covered with ferns in a forest west of Sebring, Florida. It was late AM, my son was along, and I was teaching a group of Boy Scouts how to do orienteering and geocaching. In contrast, without looking at the records, I have no idea what cache was #200, #300, #400, #500 or #600...perhaps when I get to #1000 I will take a photo or something.

 

Anyway, is this common? Do most of you (or few of you) keep track of your signficant finds?

 

Is it common for #100 to be very special? More so that #500?

 

Am I just a whacko or did I get bored after 100?

 

I remember #100, #1000, and I'm close to 2000 which I will also remember.

More than these, though, I remember great locations and container/presentations.

One I'll never forget was your " View Carre' "

I didn't get to meet you, but your apprentice did a great job. Thanks again, Bam.

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Recently I found #300. It was very fortunate that I was out caching with my older brother and his friend who introduced me to caching. We took a picture, posted it with the log, and went out for a big meal and a cold beer! Some times when I don't have the time to get out to do some caching, I like to look over my finds in my profile and smile about the great times, places, and people that I have met while doing this activity. I don't get real hung up about numbers, but try to enjoy each caching experience, one at a time.

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I remember in vivid detail my 100th find -- a full size cache hidden in a huge log covered with ferns in a forest west of Sebring, Florida. It was late AM, my son was along, and I was teaching a group of Boy Scouts how to do orienteering and geocaching. In contrast, without looking at the records, I have no idea what cache was #200, #300, #400, #500 or #600...perhaps when I get to #1000 I will take a photo or something.

 

Anyway, is this common? Do most of you (or few of you) keep track of your signficant finds?

 

Is it common for #100 to be very special? More so that #500?

 

Am I just a whacko or did I get bored after 100?

 

I remember #100, #1000, and I'm close to 2000 which I will also remember.

More than these, though, I remember great locations and container/presentations.

One I'll never forget was your " View Carre' "

I didn't get to meet you, but your apprentice did a great job. Thanks again, Bam.

 

Glad you enjoyed it........come back anytime ( We're down briefly for some elevator work, Katrina blew the one you took off the roof)

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