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Simple, Cheap, And Easily Mass-produced Cache Design.


Me_Rock
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ok, i was just thinking about how i could make a cache...and then my brain jumped to pvc pipe. you know, the white plastic pipe that comes from hardware stores. ok, so you could get an 8 foot long section of 4" or so diameter pipe (or whatever you want) get a couple end cap fittings, and a couple screw cap fittings. get some pvc glue and primer, glue the permanent cap on one end, glue the screw cap and lid at the other, and you have a very nice-sized, waterproof, rugged, and simple cache. these things are so waterproof, you could put them underwater if you want. if you wanted to get really fancy, you could get a can(s) of paint made for plastic, and you could paint it orange (high visibility) or camo (duh) or any color you want. anyway, just an idea.

 

happy caching,

Phil "fredbobjoe"

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ok, i was just thinking about how i could make a cache...and then my brain jumped to pvc pipe. you know, the white plastic pipe that comes from hardware stores. ok, so you could get an 8 foot long section of 4" or so diameter pipe (or whatever you want) get a couple end cap fittings, and a couple screw cap fittings. get some pvc glue and primer, glue the permanent cap on one end, glue the screw cap and lid at the other, and you have a very nice-sized, waterproof, rugged, and simple cache. these things are so waterproof, you could put them underwater if you want. if you wanted to get really fancy, you could get a can(s) of paint made for plastic, and you could paint it orange (high visibility) or camo (duh) or any color you want. anyway, just an idea.

 

happy caching,

Phil "fredbobjoe"

 

Uh-oh, fine for the forests, not a good idea for urban areas/parks. Somebody will probably Markwell a thread on this subject from about a week ago explaining that PVC pipe caches and pipe bombs often have the same appearance.

 

Also, it does take the extra work to make them wateproof as you mentioned--caps alone don't always do the job.

 

(Edit: Oh well, foiled again by my slow fingers, and LaPaglia's expertise.)

Edited by Teach2Learn
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Sounds good but we have found one early in december, no snow but there were two problems that I could see with it. Luckly both are easily remedied. There is 4 or 5 complete threads to bet the screw in cap to seat fully. When there is water in the threads and it freezes, it is difficult to remove the cap which can lead to the second problem, cap not fully screwed back in which leads to a total seal failure. The cure, remove 2 or 3 threads from each part and the cap seats in two revolutions and ice has less suface to work on. Also the cache can be hidden vertically, cap down and as long as water doesn't pool around it, your safe. Now this is only a concern if your cache is in an area that freezes, floods or both.

Edited by stickman756
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I've found a few of these PVC things in the wild.

Water proof?

I've come across a number of caches in "water proof" containers. Water proof ammo boxes, chemical decon kits, rubber made containers, pvc pipe, etc all have had water in them if located on the ground where snow and water can accumulate. While I admit I've never had the privilege of searching for a truly under water cache, the ones above the water line undergo extremes in temperature changes. In the course of a year there can be more than a 100 degree temperature change. the air will be forced out and forced back in unless there is a really tight seal. Also, it doesn't take much tightening on the joints of the PVC to make it almost impossible to open in the field. I don't usually bring along a pipe wrench.

I believe the Titanic was supposed to be water proof.....

 

Lets just go with water resistant.

It's still a good idea though as the PVC things do make durable containers and they can be cheaper than ammo boxes.

Just protect the log book.

Edited by SGT red jeep
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When I just started geocaching I considered putting together one of these PVC pipe caches. After a visit to Home Depot to price the parts I quickly gave up the idea. It runs about $15 to make one. So unless you have the parts already, it really isn't a cost effective container.

 

I've since found a good number of caches hidden in these containers. I can't recall one that was dry. If you hand tighten the cap, it isn't tight enough to seal out water and if you tighten it enough to seal out water, the next person won't be able to open it without tools.

 

Also, as others mentioned these are easily mistaken for pipe bombs, so you have to be very careful where you place them.

 

Overall there are much better and cheaper containers out there.

Edited by briansnat
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As the starter of a recent thread on PVC pipe caches, I too quickly scrapped the idea due to cost and bulk...as well as the moisture issue and that the cap could be impossible to remove in winter months.

 

Here is the discussion: http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=136564

 

I ended up with a tall Nalgene widemouth bottle. This was the size/form factor I was looking for and is nicely water-tight.

 

7dbf13ae-aab7-4a53-8bde-a22b41563acd.jpg

Edited by markp99
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its been done MANY times. they tend to be mistaken for pipe bombs no matter what color they are.

This cache is one of those.

 

Okay, less bomb like......

 

I mass produced nearly 300 Folgers Fresh Seal coffe containers into caches (containing 12,500+ micro caches) for my One Degree of Separation project.

 

They're supremely waterproof (over 2 years of field testing) and all it takes is pennies worth of plastic primer to get a result like this:

 

e821fbea-7b4f-4367-9a75-53bec4ed6ded.jpg

 

It made for a rather impressive display to have them all assembled.

 

e4a24160-566e-4384-a4c2-59d64eb59b35.jpg

Edited by Snoogans
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Gotta echo the previous judgments on PVC's especially Briansat's, I too have never ran across a dry one. Actually for a cheap container if you are intending to place it where there would be limited access by critters I have found the 3 quart food storage cannisters (the screw top ones) made by Aero Plastics to be very effective. I have several placed and have not had a single problem as yet. The best part is I can pick them up at our local Dollar Tree for a buck each.

 

Another alternative that is similair to PVC is a mortar tube that can be aquired from a military surplus store. Other than that there are always the old reliable ammo cans and Lock & Locks. I think I saw another conatiner recently that was a knock off of a Lock & Lock, but don't know what they run or how good they are.

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its been done MANY times. they tend to be mistaken for pipe bombs no matter what color they are.

This cache is one of those.

 

Okay, less bomb like......

 

I mass produced nearly 300 Folgers Fresh Seal coffe containers into caches (containing 12,500+ micro caches) for my One Degree of Separation project.

 

They're supremely waterproof (over 2 years of field testing) and all it takes is pennies worth of plastic primer to get a result like this:

 

e821fbea-7b4f-4367-9a75-53bec4ed6ded.jpg

 

It made for a rather impressive display to have them all assembled.

 

e4a24160-566e-4384-a4c2-59d64eb59b35.jpg

 

Unfortunately, the local rodents (desert packrats are VERY curious about new objects in their territories) will smell the coffee residue and perforate the container. They especially like the rim of the lid for some reason.

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Unfortunately, the local rodents (desert packrats are VERY curious about new objects in their territories) will smell the coffee residue and perforate the container. They especially like the rim of the lid for some reason.

Agreed -- just a couple of weeks ago we found a plastic coffee-container cache that had been "animuggled" -- it was scattered on the ground, with lots of small-critter teethmarks on pieces of it, especially the lid.

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they're supremely waterproof (over 2 years of field testing) and all it takes is pennies worth of plastic primer to get a result like this: SNIP

 

It hasn't been my experience. Maybe they work in Texas, but they fail really quickly in the rainy, snowy northeast. They are consistenty wet when I find them.

 

I ended up with a tall Nalgene widemouth bottle. This was the size/form factor I was looking for and is nicely water-tight.

 

Good, watertight congtainers. The problem I have with them is the "wide mouth" isn't very wide. Whenver I find one of these the logbook is invariably chewed to pieces by people trying to extract and replace it. Also kind of tough getting the contents in and out. With the right size logbook (I used a cut down spiral bound in mine) they can be great containers. A little on the expensive side though ($6 new) , unless you have a few laying around.

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I mass produced nearly 300 Folgers Fresh Seal coffe containers into caches (containing 12,500+ micro caches) for my One Degree of Separation project.

Just curious, how did you get 300 Folger's containers? Did someone drink 300 containers worth of coffee?

You haven't met snoogans yet, have you? ;):)

 

Back OT-I've found a few containers like the OP describes. Either the contents were damp and smelly, or the cap was on so tight that I couldn't get it open and just wrote my name on the container. ;)

They are a bad idea.

Edited by wimseyguy
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Good, watertight congtainers. The problem I have with them is the "wide mouth" isn't very wide. Whenver I find one of these the logbook is invariably chewed to pieces by people trying to extract and replace it. Also kind of tough getting the contents in and out. With the right size logbook (I used a cut down spiral bound in mine) they can be great containers. A little on the expensive side though ($6 new) , unless you have a few laying around.

I ran a length of colorful <.250 diameter rope down along the spine and tied a mini carabiner to the ~8in long free end. Hopefully the 'biner is stuffed in last, making it quite simple to yank the log book out. Otherwise simply tipping the container usually causes the biner to spill out first.

 

Cost $0. I found the container lying abandoned on the side of the road while returning from a recent cache adventure. So, I was just cleaning up a bit, really. ;) The bottle was scuffed (probably fell off a bike or motorcycle) but not cracked, but the camo job covered up the boo-boos nicely.

Edited by markp99
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Good, watertight congtainers. The problem I have with them is the "wide mouth" isn't very wide. Whenver I find one of these the logbook is invariably chewed to pieces by people trying to extract and replace it. Also kind of tough getting the contents in and out. With the right size logbook (I used a cut down spiral bound in mine) they can be great containers. A little on the expensive side though ($6 new) , unless you have a few laying around.

I ran a length of colorful <.250 diameter rope down along the spine and tied a mini carabiner to the ~8in long free end. Hopefully the 'biner is stuffed in last, making it quite simple to yank the log book out. Otherwise simply tipping the container usually causes the biner to spill out first.

 

Cost $0. I found the container lying abandoned on the side of the road while returning from a recent cache adventure. So, I was just cleaning up a bit, really. ;) The bottle was scuffed (probably fell off a bike or motorcycle) but not cracked, but the camo job covered up the boo-boos nicely.

I cut down a spiral-bound notebook so that it was tall and narrow, and then attached the back cover of it to a wooden paint-stirrer that is almost the same height as the nalgene jar. Just grab the top of that and the logbook comes out with it, without getting mangled. ;)

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Before we start - please take all safety precautions while making the Cache. Strong Chemicals are used and this should be done outside or in a well ventilated area away from children.

 

First - The Finished Product. Which should cost you about 12 Bucks in Parts once you have the paint/glue etc

that you will need to make more.

 

finishedproduct.jpg

 

Now - How do you make it? Very simple.

 

Take a trip to Home Depot - What will you need.

 

#1 - You will need PVC Cleaner, Primer and Glue.

glue.jpg

 

#2 - You will need both Green and Black Plastic Spraypaint (it has a build in primer)

spray.jpg

 

#3 - You will need to have someone help you cut a 12 Inch Piece of 4" PVC Pipe

#4 - You will need a 4" PVC EndCap

#5 - You will need a 4" PVC ScrewCap

#6 - You will need a 4" Screwcap Adapter or Flange

pieces.jpg

 

Okay - So now you have all the parts you need to make your super heavy duty, watertight, paintable, nearly indistructable cache.

 

How do you put it together so that it's totally water tight? Good Question - Let me show you.

 

First use the PVC Cleaner Solvent and "clean" all the contact surfaces of the PVC pipe.

This will be inside the flange - Inside the Endcap - and about an inch or two from the ends of

the 12" PVC pipe you had cut.

 

cleaning.jpg

 

Next you Choose the Adapter - "Prime" The outside of the 12" Pipe - and then quickly

"Glue" The inside of the adapter. Then as quickly as you can - slide the pipe into the adpater

and press them together as hard as humanly possible. You have about 2 seconds. If you need

some additional strength - place the flange on the ground and press down on the pipe into the adapter.

 

Be a bit more liberal with the glue than seen in the photo - two or three circles with the applicator should do.

 

pipeprime.jpg

flangeglue.jpg

 

5 Seconds have passed - the pipe is now welded to the flange - forever.

 

Next do the endcap with the same procedure. Pressing down very hard when you join them.

Again you can place the pipe on the ground and press the endcap in using your body weight.

 

Your Cache Pipe should now look something like this. The glue is already dry.

 

almostthere.jpg

 

Now - To Paint it - so it looks like a cache! Camo Colors. (shake spraycan well)

 

Use the Black spray paint first - and cover the entire cache (don't forget the lid)

 

cacheblack.jpg

 

While the Black Paint is still wet - take the green spray can and with short quick strokes

apply the green camo to the black container. You can use as much or as little as you want.

 

greenspray.jpg

 

Don't forget the Lid.

 

If you do too much green - you can always go right back over it with black again - until you find

a balance that makes you happy.

 

Let the paint dry for a little while. Use a paint pen or one of those metallic Sharpies and you can write

on the Cache itself. Wala - you have a finished product.

 

I hope you can make use of this in your geocaching adventures, maybe we will see some more regular

sized caches out there without wet logs ;) That and your wives won't get upset with you stealing all the tupperware containers.

 

If you have any suggestions - please feel free to post them.

 

Thanks,

BigMahma

Sarasota, FL

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Looks great!

 

Send us postcards from prison when mistakenly get caught laying that *pipebomb* under a bridge. ;)

 

How are you dealing with leaky threads from those PVC fittings? I abandoned a similar idea due to cost and advice gotten here about un-waterproofness of the cache. Also, I had concerns that the cover would never come off in the winter months up here in the northeast. http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=136564

Edited by markp99
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Looks great!

 

Send us postcards from prison when mistakenly get caught laying that *pipebomb* under a bridge. ;)

 

How are you dealing with leaky threads from those PVC fittings? I abandoned a similar idea due to cost and advice gotten here about un-waterproofness of the cache. Also, I had concerns that the cover would never come off in the winter months up here in the northeast.

 

hahahaha - will do ;) I write geocaching.com on the lid and on the side of the cache. Plus this isn't the type

of cache you would hide under a bridge LOL.

 

That's pretty funny tho.

 

As for the leaky threads - It doesn't leak. It would pretty much have to be submerged and under pressure

before it would leak - I've tested it in my bathtub - and if it's exposed to a flood out in the world - the last thing I'll worry about is leaking - I'll likely never find my poor cache again!

 

So to answer your question - as far as I can tell - it's fairly waterproof - but I guess only the test of time

will let me know if this is true or not.

 

As for freezing in the NorthEast. Honestly I haven't thought of that problem... Since I live in tropical weather year round. With a little reasearch i've found something called 'poly pipe' which they recommend you use if you bury the pipe in the ground that can freeze.

 

The grip on the lid is big enough so an adult can get firm torque on it. Maybe suggest the cacher bring a wrench with them. LOL

 

Good questions - and something to take into consideration in freezing climates.

Edited by BigMahma
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That's pretty funny tho.

It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

 

It looks like you went to a lot of trouble with your description, and you did a great job with it. But seriously, it looks like a pipe bomb, and depending on where it's hidden it could get a lot of unwanted attention if a muggle sees it and calls the cops before they get close enough to read what you've written on the side.

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

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Aquatic Ecosystems sells clear acrylic pipe if you want to construct a similar device with a see-through chamber so the B-squad is not called out to detonate your cache. If you want it camo, then just mask off a viewing port before painting.

 

Nice write-up! Thanks <_< ImpalaBob

 

THANK YOU!!! I've been looking for this for about 6 months off and on for annother project I'm working on. I'd just about given up hope! I knew that they made clear pipe similar to PVC but just couldn't find it.

 

-PMaholm

 

(And now back to our regularly scheduled post)

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That's pretty funny tho.

It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

 

It looks like you went to a lot of trouble with your description, and you did a great job with it. But seriously, it looks like a pipe bomb, and depending on where it's hidden it could get a lot of unwanted attention if a muggle sees it and calls the cops before they get close enough to read what you've written on the side.

 

Maybe I should write on it "NOT A PIPE BOMB"

 

But really - whoever finds these things out in the woods or a park somewhere - they

are finding a extreamly camoflauged item - deep in the woods - looking for it

with the help of a device that measures distance to the foot. We STILL have trouble finding them.

 

People who find these caches are looking for them. I find it unlikely that

a geo-muggle will thrash through the woods - find your cache and assume it's

a bomb - anymore than they would think an ammo box or a old coffee can was.

(assuming they COULD find it - most likely they will walk right past it)

 

But - maybe I'm wrong... Maybe someone out there actually does hide bombs in the woods..

where there is nothing to blow up.

 

Thank you for your feedback <_< It's actually a good debate - since I've never considered the fact

that it might be mistaken for a bomb in the woods hidden under a bush.

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

Maybe, but why make it worse for our reputation by making a cache that actually looks like a bomb?

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

Maybe, but why make it worse for our reputation by making a cache that actually looks like a bomb?

 

Oh, please tell us what a bomb looks like.

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

 

Exactly.

 

I used an old coffee thermus as a cache recently - could that be a bomb?

A mentos container - could that be a bomb?

A gladware container painted camo - could that be a bomb?

 

In the history of geocaching - I truly wonder how many times a bomb squad has actually

been called to blow something up 600 feet in the woods.

 

With a little searching - I did find this. It's basically a little common sense - LABEL the Cache.

 

http://arkgeocaching.org/modules.php?name=...56c6bdb65e97f3a

 

Thanks for this information! With the national heightened state of preparedness over the past three (3) years, relating to IED’s (improvised explosive devices), police departments everywhere treat such “finds” with extreme caution. As is required for such possible serious/sensitive events, I was immediately contacted about this “emergency”: additionally our Fire Department’s Bomb Squad was tasked to respond. We all were greatly relieved when it was determined to be a harmless ammo box containing fill matter (rocks & earth) that was related to your group’s GPS hunt.

 

 

Our comfort zone may be less taxed, as well as our budgets, by diminishing our “off-duty” callout of emergency services personnel, if each “cache” had a label affixed externally that clearly explains this GPS game, to include 24/7 contact names and numbers. I genuinely support your group’s goals of litter clean up and outdoor activities; however, to preclude subsequent diversion of Officers to set up a perimeter and/or the unnecessary calling in a municipality’s bomb squad, etc., a phone call to you or whoever would probably clear up the issue.

 

Please think on this and let me know if this is plausible.

 

Thanks!

 

Randall

 

Chief Randall Aragon

Conway Police Department

1105 Prairie Street

Conway, AR 72032

(501) 450-6126 (ofc)

(501) 733-2111 (cell)

cpd.aragon@conwaycorp.net

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

Maybe, but why make it worse for our reputation by making a cache that actually looks like a bomb?

 

Oh, please tell us what a bomb looks like.

 

LOL

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Seems like we are having a rehash of the PVC container topic, so let me again share my experiences with them:

 

1. I have NEVER found a dry one. Many were placed early on around here in the early days of caching and every single one without exception fell victim to moldy, gross contents from water intrusion.

 

2. There are nearly impossible to open in the winter here unless you are lucky enough to be carrying plumbing tools.

 

3. Our parks department has stated they do not wish to have their workers unduly alarmed by the placement of such a container. Yes, they do appear bomb -like no matter what previous posters have stated.

 

4. They are expensive to make and most really can't hold swag as efficiently as ammo cans.

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It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

Of course, if you do that search, you'll discover that gladware has about the same odds of getting destroyed by the men in blue as does PVC pipe.

Maybe, but why make it worse for our reputation by making a cache that actually looks like a bomb?

 

Oh, please tell us what a bomb looks like.

 

Here ya go, this is an actual bomb, any questions about PVC's now ???:

 

2838011_200X150.jpg

 

http://www.kirotv.com/news/2837626/detail.html

Edited by Bill & Tammy
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... after tying unsuccessfully to twist the cap off for over 10 minutes I just wrote my name on the container. :blink:I usually carry a sharpie in my caching pack and even a multitool, but not a pipe wrench.

 

 

gadzooks, here we go again.... <_<

There, I edited it to show what I really did in greater detail. Happy now? :blink::ph34r:

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The best containers i have found so far are the screw on top igloo water containers. You can get them at Wallyworld or the Bullseye store for less than $3.00 and the are about one quart size. There is no lip inside for the log to get stuck on and they are water tight. (They keep water in so they keep it out as well) I currently have three of them out as caches and plan to use more. One has been out since January and the monthly checks of it still show the log and interior nice and dry. the only issue I have seen so far is someone putting the lid on too tight to keep it dry. A little elbow grese and you're in.

 

I had a previous post where I explained my testing process for containers. The short version is as follows:

 

Bought a bunch of different containers, different prices and sizes

 

filled them with 1 pound of lead weights and dropped them from a height of approx. 6 feet onto concrete

 

Stepped on the container with my full weight in hiking boot (210lbs) YES! that is my weight, stop laughing

 

placed tissue paper in containers in area in back yard sprayed area with water hose

 

covered them with leaves

 

opened containers every day for 5 minutes then closed, continued to wet area with hose

 

Results:

 

Ammo can dented a little and chipped concrete, seal still good interior stayed dry

 

thermos bottle no cracks or dents, interior dry

 

"tupperware" container broke when stepped on second container damp on inside

 

Gladware container broke when stepped on container wet inside

 

Lock-n-lock small crack from drop, slight condensation inside of second container

 

I know these are not scientific, but I found that the thermos bottle was the Best buy, and the ammo can the most durable.

 

The Gladware (you know the ones) were the worst.

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Here ya go, this is an actual bomb, any questions about PVC's now ???:

 

<snip>

I guess thermos bottles are out too, huh?

ied%20con%20un%20termos.jpg

Face it, you can make a bomb out of anything. Life would be so much easier if they all were three red sticks with an alarm clock attached.

Edited by sbell111
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Seems like we are having a rehash of the PVC container topic, so let me again share my experiences with them:

 

1. I have NEVER found a dry one. Many were placed early on around here in the early days of caching and every single one without exception fell victim to moldy, gross contents from water intrusion.

 

2. There are nearly impossible to open in the winter here unless you are lucky enough to be carrying plumbing tools.

 

3. Our parks department has stated they do not wish to have their workers unduly alarmed by the placement of such a container. Yes, they do appear bomb -like no matter what previous posters have stated.

 

4. They are expensive to make and most really can't hold swag as efficiently as ammo cans.

 

My experience has been identical. They are invariably wet inside. The lid has to be firmly tightned to keep water out, but if it is firmly tightened the next finder can't open it without tools. So most people just close the lid a twist or two and water gets in easily.

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Ammo can dented a little and chipped concrete

 

chipped concrete.. haaa.....do you have neighbors??? "that guy next door is dropping things out the window again Marge"

Scientific maybe not but you should get an A for effort!

 

Out of curiosity, how much do you all pay for ammo cans? We got ours for 3.95 each and my dad claims he can get them for 2.50.

 

We have gotten so much rain here lately it seems like everything is wet...

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I mass produced nearly 300 Folgers Fresh Seal coffe containers into caches (containing 12,500+ micro caches) for my One Degree of Separation project.

Just curious, how did you get 300 Folger's containers? Did someone drink 300 containers worth of coffee?

 

I got this crazy idea from a thread about breeder caches and the Kevin Bacon game has always been a favorite of mine.

 

It took 3 years to gather all of the regular sized containers and something like 500 man-hours including the 2 events to assemble and paint everything.

 

It took one more event to give them all out during the GW4 weekend. Now there are 213 caches listed in 27 states and 4 foreign countries including 3 Canadian provinces.

 

The project grows by 2-5 new listings a day! I'm expecting over 1,400 to be listed by this time NEXT year....

Edited by Snoogans
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When I just started geocaching I considered putting together one of these PVC pipe caches. After a visit to Home Depot to price the parts I quickly gave up the idea. It runs about $15 to make one. So unless you have the parts already, it really isn't a cost effective container.

 

I've since found a good number of caches hidden in these containers. I can't recall one that was dry. If you hand tighten the cap, it isn't tight enough to seal out water and if you tighten it enough to seal out water, the next person won't be able to open it without tools.

...

Thats pretty much what I was going to say, though locally its more like 8-10 bucks depending on if you use a clean out trap, or a rubber 'test' plug for the opening end. But it doesn't really matter because you can get an ammo box for that ( often 1/2), And with ammo boxes you don't need to deal with that terriable pvc glue smell.

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I have found found caches like that here in Florida. One had the top on so tight I did use a pipe wrench to open it, Dry inside. The other the top was hand tight and wet inside. I also found a large Folgers can that was wet and moldy inside. Hard to beat ammo cans and Decons.

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That's pretty funny tho.

It's not as funny as you think. Do a search for "pipe bomb" or "bomb" in these forums and read up on how many caches you can find that have been mistaken for a bomb.

 

It looks like you went to a lot of trouble with your description, and you did a great job with it. But seriously, it looks like a pipe bomb, and depending on where it's hidden it could get a lot of unwanted attention if a muggle sees it and calls the cops before they get close enough to read what you've written on the side.

 

Maybe I should write on it "NOT A PIPE BOMB"

 

But really - whoever finds these things out in the woods or a park somewhere - they

are finding a extreamly camoflauged item - deep in the woods - looking for it

with the help of a device that measures distance to the foot. We STILL have trouble finding them.

 

People who find these caches are looking for them. I find it unlikely that

a geo-muggle will thrash through the woods - find your cache and assume it's

a bomb - anymore than they would think an ammo box or a old coffee can was.

(assuming they COULD find it - most likely they will walk right past it)

 

But - maybe I'm wrong... Maybe someone out there actually does hide bombs in the woods..

where there is nothing to blow up.

 

Thank you for your feedback :( It's actually a good debate - since I've never considered the fact

that it might be mistaken for a bomb in the woods hidden under a bush.

 

This past year a "sprinkler head" type cache was hidden under a lamp skirt at the far edges of a Home Depot store. A muggle saw somebody do a find and reported it to the police. The next thing you know the bomb squad was there ready to blow it up. But a local cop (and geocacher) got wind of what was happening and managed to save the cache before the BIG BANG.

 

My only question about this whole story is WHY would anybody hide a very small bomb at a lamp post at the far edge of a parking lot? But I guess the police gotta do what they've gotta do. After all, there are some pretty crazy people out there who don't think like normal people (not that I'm normal :D ).

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Hey BigMahma, welcome to the forums! A beautifully illustrated demo on cache construction. Met with the standard forum courtesty! <_< Seriously, please hide those things WAAAY the heck out into some big hunk of wild Florida real estate - some South Fl Water Management Lands or a big state forest.

 

I've never seen a dry PVC container, and I live in Florida. Unfortunately, the threads get sandy and then they're hard to turn. So they don't get turned very tight and leak. Once in DRR fashion, I signed the OUTSIDE of one of these, because I wasn't carrying a pipe wrench and couldn't open it. The next cachers that actually could open it (I watchlisted it) reported it to be very wet, so even tightening it down hard hadn't worked once the threads have been "sanded".

 

I can buy a 50mm ammo can for $5 (though I understand that most folks are paying more) - holds more, stays dry, takes paint well though it doesn't really require paint at all (PVC tends to flake), and 98% of cachers can open and close it. (2% of cachers can't close an ammo can, a decon or a lock and lock. Why is that? )

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