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Couparangus

Canadian Geopub Quiz

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RES2100's Silver peak comes to mind... made of quartz. I think you can canoe to it, but I was considering the hike last summer. Time ran out though

 

Bingo... almost.

 

You have named the highest peak. You have named the rock, or close enough (quartzite). Now just name the actual range...

 

I didn't know the name of the range until I looked it up. Now that I've done that, I do remember hearing of it before.

 

Let's see if somebody else know the name

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LaCloche Mountain Range. (Didn't look it up either)

 

La Cloche is correct. The highest peak is Silver Peak and it has a cache on it. The range started to form 2.5 billion years ago, and is predominantly made of quartzite, which is sparkling white. The Group of Seven liked to hang out in this area a lot. In my humble opinion, this area is one of the crown jewels of Canada.

 

IMG_3263.jpg

IMG_3268.jpg

 

Sorry for making the question too hard.

 

Now, if anybody knows if there is a trail out of Killarney lake up Silver Lake, please PM me. I'm leaving on Sunday. Cheers!

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LaCloche Mountain Range. (Didn't look it up either)

 

La Cloche is correct. The highest peak is Silver Peak and it has a cache on it. The range started to form 2.5 billion years ago, and is predominantly made of quartzite, which is sparkling white. The Group of Seven liked to hang out in this area a lot. In my humble opinion, this area is one of the crown jewels of Canada.

 

Sorry for making the question too hard.

 

Now, if anybody knows if there is a trail out of Killarney lake up Silver Lake, please PM me. I'm leaving on Sunday. Cheers!

 

Looks like a nice place, I'd like to visit it one day.

Edited by shearzone

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Looks like a nice place, I'd like to visit it one day.

 

Yep, it's nice all right. Of course, the "mountains" are not like those young-pup mountains out your end of the country (my favourite of which is Castle Mountain). After 2 billion years, and relentless scouring by glaciers, they are worn down. But the beauty of the area is amazing. To get into the interior of Killarney for 3 days (in the middle of the week) we had to book months in advance!

 

Feel free to check out some more photos from our last trip HERE. Just click on the "Sudbury-Killarney 2002" photo album.

 

(By the way, now I see the meaning behind your handle "shearzone"!)

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Okay Ted, let's hear a Geoquestion from you now. :shocked:

 

I didn't really think it was my turn as I only answered 1/3 of the question, but here goes:

A 5 part question - just kidding! :( (Personally, I think we should keep them to a single question to help move things along.)

 

What is the name of the constellation of satellites who's predictable glints can sometimes be seen in broad daylight with a maximum magnitude of -8 (30 times brighter than Venus)?

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Okay Ted, let's hear a Geoquestion from you now. <_<

 

I didn't really think it was my turn as I only answered 1/3 of the question, but here goes:

A 5 part question - just kidding! :unsure: (Personally, I think we should keep them to a single question to help move things along.)

 

What is the name of the constellation of satellites who's predictable glints can sometimes be seen in broad daylight with a maximum magnitude of -8 (30 times brighter than Venus)?

 

Navsat?

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UFOs? <_<

Sputnik?

Laika and the Cosmonauts?

 

Okay, I'm a terrestrial radio guy. At least that's my excuse.

Edited by Couparangus

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What is the name of the constellation of satellites who's predictable glints can sometimes be seen in broad daylight with a maximum magnitude of -8 (30 times brighter than Venus)?

 

Iridium network.

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What is the name of the constellation of satellites who's predictable glints can sometimes be seen in broad daylight with a maximum magnitude of -8 (30 times brighter than Venus)?

 

Iridium network.

 

BINGO!

 

A detailed description of Iridium Satellites and how the flare (glint) is created can be found Here.

Heavens-Above has predictions for Iridium Flares as well as other satellites.

 

Whenever we go camping, I bring along a printout for a weeks worth of flares. If the weather permits, we'll venture to an area with a clear view of the sky and watch them. The 'wow' factor has still not worn off for me. I've yet to see a daytime flare, but the bright ones at night are amazing! <_<

 

You're up GrosseFamille.

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Woohoo!

 

Here goes.. (I know this from discussions on our local forum).

 

What are the NMEA Satellite IDs for the 2 new WAAS satellites that are partially available now but will be fully operational this fall?

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Woohoo!

 

Here goes.. (I know this from discussions on our local forum).

 

What are the NMEA Satellite IDs for the 2 new WAAS satellites that are partially available now but will be fully operational this fall?

 

35 and 47?

 

BTW, my Company provided almost all the antennas on the Iridium satellites.... it was quite an exciting project from a technical point of view, but a financial and marketing disaster!

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Woohoo!

 

Here goes.. (I know this from discussions on our local forum).

 

What are the NMEA Satellite IDs for the 2 new WAAS satellites that are partially available now but will be fully operational this fall?

 

35 and 47?

 

BTW, my Company provided almost all the antennas on the Iridium satellites.... it was quite an exciting project from a technical point of view, but a financial and marketing disaster!

Nope! 35 is an current WAAS satellite.. I don't know about 47..

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33 and 37?

No. These are 2 EGNOS satellites.

 

And for the previous answers, 47 is also a current WAAS sat.

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Whew!

 

pAnik.... get it everyone?? <_< OK, here comes a 2-parter:

 

Staying on the satellite theme, then... large communications satellites operate in geostationary orbit. As the name implies, these satellites appear to be stationary when observed from a point on the earth, even though our planet is spinning pretty quickly. The advantages are fairly obvious.... a satellite can be designed to provide service to a specific region, signals can be sent up from a simple terminal which does not require tracking and so on. (ever seen those satellite trucks at sports events, etc?)

 

A pretty famous guy came up with this concept... long before satellites or launch vehicles were even invented. Anyone know who this is? In what publication did he publish this seemingly crazy idea?

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Whew!

 

pAnik.... get it everyone?? <_< OK, here comes a 2-parter:

 

Staying on the satellite theme, then... large communications satellites operate in geostationary orbit. As the name implies, these satellites appear to be stationary when observed from a point on the earth, even though our planet is spinning pretty quickly. The advantages are fairly obvious.... a satellite can be designed to provide service to a specific region, signals can be sent up from a simple terminal which does not require tracking and so on. (ever seen those satellite trucks at sports events, etc?)

 

A pretty famous guy came up with this concept... long before satellites or launch vehicles were even invented. Anyone know who this is? In what publication did he publish this seemingly crazy idea?

 

Albert Einstein

Theory of Relativity (theorum Relativum or something like that)

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Herman Potocnik

in the book "The Problem of Space Travel - The Rocket Motor".

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Nope.

 

It must have been Sir Isaac Newton then. I recall that it was about placing a cannon on a high enough hill so that when you shoot the cannon, the cannonball's arc exceeds the earth's curvature enough that it never falls to earth. I don't recall the name of Newton's work other than I think it was short and latin. Something like my previous answer of 'Theorum Relativum'.

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Isaac Newton eh?

 

"De motu corprum in gyrum" which i think translates to the motion of bodies in orbit?

 

I like fighting with Physics PhDs in my spare time (no really..)

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Isaac Newton eh?

 

"De motu corprum in gyrum" which i think translates to the motion of bodies in orbit?

 

I like fighting with Physics PhDs in my spare time (no really..)

 

I'm going to guess that it was Galileo. That's a name I hear thrown around a lot when it comes to space stuff. As for the publication, not sure - I wasn't around to read it at the time it was published :(

Edited by northernpenguin

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Isaac Newton eh?

 

"De motu corprum in gyrum" which i think translates to the motion of bodies in orbit?

 

I like fighting with Physics PhDs in my spare time (no really..)

 

I'm going to guess that it was Galileo. That's a name I hear thrown around a lot when it comes to space stuff. As for the publication, not sure - I wasn't around to read it at the time it was published :(

 

Are you insinuating that I was around when newton was getting whacked with apples? I am not as old as I look young fella!

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Arthur C Clarke

AV is correct, but it's a two part question!

 

He is still kicking around and lives in Sri Lanka. Among other little things, he wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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Oh man, I hadn't looked at this thread for a bit... and finally part of a question that I knew

 

But sadly like most I don't know the publication...

 

Arthur C Clark suggested the "Geosyncronous Orbit", also known as "Clark Orbit" being a fixed point above the Earth.

 

Some people think, erroneously, that it is equi-distant between the Earth and the Moon. Obviously that can't be right since the Moon orbits, as well as the gravitational equalibrium point between the Earth and Moon is not halfway between them.

 

The trick for the Clark Orbit is for the velocity of the satellite motion to match that of the Earth, while maintaining the balance between gravity's pull on the satellite with the escape velocity that would allow it to fly off on its own.

 

While it seems obvious to us now, this was great idea that took a great thinker to bring forward.

 

Okay... I'm done adding nothingness to this thread :laughing:

 

:laughing: The Blue Quasar

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Was the publication Astounding SF, actually written as a blurb of science fiction rather than science fact?

 

I think I've read them all.

 

But, A.C.C has been known to write about Lagrange points as well.

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Could it be Rama?

 

Only other title of one of his novels I can remember right now... and it takes place on an alien satellite/space station, so it could be. Though I know he also wrote non-fiction books (no idea of the titles of those)

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Arthur C Clarke

AV is correct, but it's a two part question!

 

He is still kicking around and lives in Sri Lanka. Among other little things, he wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

I just remember readiung it years ago, where ACC talks about several theories, but the title totally escapes me.

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Well, I'll give a little hint.... the idea was not published in a book or novel.

 

Scientific American?

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Well, I'll give a little hint.... the idea was not published in a book or novel.

 

I gave up and looked it up, I have to admit that I would never guess this correctly. I'll let others take wild guesses and see if anybody can actually get it witout looking it up. :sad:

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Well, I'll give a little hint.... the idea was not published in a book or novel.

 

Scientific American?

 

Nope.

 

Another hint... it was a British publication, and the year was 1945.

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Well, I'll give a little hint.... the idea was not published in a book or novel.

 

I gave up and looked it up, I have to admit that I would never guess this correctly. I'll let others take wild guesses and see if anybody can actually get it witout looking it up. :sad:

 

Ditto! Not on my top 1,000,000 list...

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Arthur C Clarke

AV is correct, but it's a two part question!

 

He is still kicking around and lives in Sri Lanka. Among other little things, he wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Herman Potocnik published the book "The Problem of Space Travel - The Rocket Motor" in 1929 were he conceived a space station in detail and calculated its geostationary orbit.

The paper you are talking about for Arthur C. Clarke was published in 1945 entitled "Extra-terrestrial Relays"

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Well, .........we're geting pretty close, so I'll give it to ya.... the article was titled "Extra-Terrestrial Relays — Can Rocket Stations Give Worldwide Radio Coverage?", and it was published in Wireless World in October 1945. "Rocket Stations"... I love it !!

 

Here is an interesting reference

 

Over to geek-e, and sorry to have dragged this out..

 

PS I must admit I was not aware of the Potocnik work! This is the fun of this Geopub Quiz... you might learn something!

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Thank you charliezulu.

 

I have another two part question.

 

How long ago was the art of navigation born and in what country?

 

geek-e

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Thank you charliezulu.

 

I have another two part question.

 

How long ago was the art of navigation born and in what country?

 

geek-e

 

10,000 BC in Atlantis...

 

Go ahead... Prove me wrong... I dare ya :)

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A couple of million years ago, somewhere in Africa (no country existed at the time...)

 

Homo Erectus certainly had to invent navigation to find their way to Europe and Asia.

 

(But I do like the hard to disprove Atlantis theory :))

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I would hazard a guess and say the Phonecians were probably the first great trading culture. I believe somewhere around 3500 BC in Greece.

 

For a real look at the history of navigation. Check this.

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To keep this going I will give a hint. It happened on the Indus River and happened at the beginning of the Bronze Age.

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To keep this going I will give a hint. It happened on the Indus River and happened at the beginning of the Bronze Age.

 

The Bronze Age started around 3,500 BCE, and the Indus Valley Civilization started around 3,300 BCE. Obviously there were no modern countries present, but the IVC was located in present-day Pakistan and parts of India.

 

Therefore, my guess is around 3,000 BCE in modern-day Pakistan.

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dano you are correct. Navigation was born over 6000 years ago on the Indus River in India. Good job.

Lets have a question.

 

geek-e

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Two moose, both claimed to be the "world's largest" when these pictures were taken in 1986. Name their locations (city and province).

 

Moose #1:

moose1.jpg

 

Moose #2:

moose2.jpg

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