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Couparangus

Canadian Geopub Quiz

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Alrighty, keeping to the Geography theme... What is the largest freshwater lake that does not contain an island.

Bonus Points: What is currently the nearest Geocache to this lake?

 

TOMTEC

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Lake Bernard near Sundridge Ontario. I believe the closest cache is Highrock 'n Roll (GCKAY6). Hmmm... Seems Tomtec found that one. I wonder how you knew it. :laughing:

 

Willowbrookfarm

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You got it... according to the Guiness Book, Lake Bernard is the largest freshwater lake without an island! My buddy has a cottage up there, so I've been playing around there for years! You're next...

 

TOMTEC

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What percentage of the earth's surface area does Canada occupy?

Canada ~= 10 million km^2.

Circumference of earth ~= 40000 km.

Surface area of earth ~= 40000^2 / pi

Canada proportion ~= 10000000 / (40000^2 / pi)

~= .0196 = 1.96%.

 

dave

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Consider the location N 43° 36.750 W 079° 16.485.

 

The N43 and W079 portions of the above coordinates are correct, but 36.750 and 16.485 portions are not correct. To help narrow it down, I'll tell you that this location is in Toronto.

 

What are the actual coordinates of this cac-- erm, I mean, this completely arbitrary location?

 

dave

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Consider the location N 43° 36.750 W 079° 16.485

Hmm, so now you want people to solve puzzle caches for you eh? How do you plan to verify that it's correct? I know, but I'm not tellin'. :huh:

 

TOMTEC

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Consider the location N 43° 36.750 W 079° 16.485

Hmm, so now you want people to solve puzzle caches for you eh? How do you plan to verify that it's correct? I know, but I'm not tellin'. :huh:

 

TOMTEC

 

I don't think that puzzle cache solutions are appropriate questions for this thread. The owner of the cache is not going to be pleased to find the solution to something they took time to set up now an easily googled answer. Yes Google indexes the Groundspeak forums.

 

Perhaps another question would be more appropriate......

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Hey dabhid07, I have to agree with the others. I'm trying to figure out this cache now and I'm not ready to call for help just yet. :huh:

 

Please ask another question.

(I'm good at the nature ones - hee hee!)

 

Cheers!

C-A

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Consider the location N 43° 36.750 W 079° 16.485

Hmm, so now you want people to solve puzzle caches for you eh? How do you plan to verify that it's correct? I know, but I'm not tellin'. :huh:

Drat. Busted.

 

OK, then. Pelee Island, which is the southernmost point in Canada, is south of how many complete US states?

 

dave

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Complete... hmmm. I know that 27 U.S. states have some of their land north of Canada's southernmost point in Ontario. I'll guess 15 are complete.

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Wow, my 1st time !

 

Easy one: The Europeans are progressing towards building their own GPS system, and have the first test satellite on orbit already.

 

What is this satellite called?

 

And who built it? (you'll be surprised, since it's not one of the big Aerospace Companies)

Edited by charliezulu

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Wow, my 1st time !

 

Easy one: The Europeans are progressing towards building their own GPS system, and have the first test satellite on orbit already.

 

What is this satellite called?

 

And who built it? (you'll be surprised, since it's not one of the big Aerospace Companies)

 

I know it! (I was just reading about it this morning.)

 

It is GALILEO, and the actual satellite name is an acronym: GIOVE. It was built by a British company called Surey. Hackers have already cracked the Galileo codes.

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Yep, the new system will be called Galileo, and the first test bird is called Galileo In Orbit Verification Experiment-A. Surrey Satellite is a smallsat builder in the U.K., but you can bet yer boots the big guns like AlacatelAlenia and EADS-Astrium will be manufacturing the large spacecraft.

 

Over to you, Dano!

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I was able to remember "GIOVE" because when I read it I thought of MISSY GIOVE. But I couldn't remember what the heck it stood for!

missy.jpg

 

Stand by for next question...

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Subject: Foreign Geography

Difficulty level: 1.5 <_<

 

Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

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Subject: Foreign Geography

Difficulty level: 1.5 <_<

 

Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

 

Counting from the centre of the country, they would be Alaska, Alaska, Maine, and Texas. Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

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Subject: Foreign Geography

Difficulty level: 1.5 <_<

 

Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

 

Counting from the centre of the country, they would be Alaska, Alaska, Maine, and Texas. Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

 

I didn't see the word continental so I'm thowing in my .02

 

N: Alaska

E: Maine

S: Puerto Rico is a territory not a state so I'll say Florida. Key west is south of the Rio Grande, is it not?

W: Hawaii

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Subject: Foreign Geography

Difficulty level: 1.5 <_<

 

Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

 

Counting from the centre of the country, they would be Alaska, Alaska, Maine, and Texas. Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

 

I didn't see the word continental so I'm thowing in my .02

 

N: Alaska

E: Maine

S: Puerto Rico is a territory not a state so I'll say Florida. Key west is south of the Rio Grande, is it not?

W: Hawaii

Dang. Forgot about the Aleutian Islands. W is Alaska too.

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Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

Counting from the centre of the country, they would be Alaska, Alaska, Maine, and Texas. Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

I agree with this, except with Hawaii as the southernmost.

 

dave

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Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

Alaska as the most eastern?

Id say Alaska, Alaska, Maine, Hawaii

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Name the most northern, western, eastern, and southern states of the United States of America.

Counting from the centre of the country, they would be Alaska, Alaska, Maine, and Texas. Counting by lat/lon they would be Alaska,Alaska, Alaska, and Texas.

I agree with this, except with Hawaii as the southernmost.

 

dave

 

I did indeed mean latitude and longtitude, since that is what we all use.

 

Well, I guess dabhid07 gets another one. Since he agreed with chris-mouse's post, and corrected for most southern, he da winner.

 

Alaska is the most northern, western, AND eastern state, since the Aleutian Island chain at 1,900 km long crosses longtitude 180°. I believe it is the final island in the chain (or is it a couple of them?) that is just on the other side of the line, which is as far east as you can go before you are west.

 

The main island is Unalaska, where over half of the 8,000+ population lives. The mean annual temperature is 3.4°C and it rains about 250 days a year, giving it a solid claim as the rainiest place in the U.S.

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I've got to stop answering these because I'm finding it increasingly difficult to come up with questions. So here's an easy one:

 

When would a cacher be using the sweep, the pry, and the J?

 

dave

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I've got to stop answering these because I'm finding it increasingly difficult to come up with questions. So here's an easy one:

 

When would a cacher be using the sweep, the pry, and the J?

 

dave

 

Cachers are curling now?

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I've got to stop answering these because I'm finding it increasingly difficult to come up with questions. So here's an easy one:

 

When would a cacher be using the sweep, the pry, and the J?

 

dave

 

When they are canoeing to a cache.

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When would a cacher be using the sweep, the pry, and the J?

When they are canoeing to a cache.

Right on. You're up.

 

dave

Edited by dabhid07

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Apparently, there are many mountain ranges that lay claim to being "among the oldest in the world" or "the oldest in North America." For example, a Canadian tourism site claims that a drive along the Appalachian route in New Brunswick will allow you to "see North America's oldest mountain range in your rearview mirror and spectacular displays of nature and coastline up ahead!" At 680 million years old, the Appalachian range does not even come close to being the oldest.

 

I am thinking of another mountain range that is the oldest in Canada, and really is among the oldest in the world.

 

>Name the mountain range and approximately how many years ago they started to form.

>Name the highest peak.

>Name the major composition of the rock.

 

This question is a bit of a gamble, because I think I know the answer and some quick research is backing me up. But I could be wrong!

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>Name the mountain range and approximately how many years ago they started to form.

>Name the highest peak.

>Name the major composition of the rock.

 

 

>The Canadian Shield is the oldest mountain range that I'm aware of. Used to be huge.

It's believed to be about 4.5 billion years old.

 

>Kinda confused on this one. Assuming you mean the highest peak that is still left in existence, as there wasn't anyone around back then to measure. They figure it was about 12,000 feet tall on average.

The CURRENT highest peak is Mount Caubvick in Nfld.

 

> Major composition ? Granite? Nickel?

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>Name the mountain range and approximately how many years ago they started to form.

>Name the highest peak.

>Name the major composition of the rock.

 

 

>The Canadian Shield is the oldest mountain range that I'm aware of. Used to be huge.

It's believed to be about 4.5 billion years old.

 

>Kinda confused on this one. Assuming you mean the highest peak that is still left in existence, as there wasn't anyone around back then to measure. They figure it was about 12,000 feet tall on average.

The CURRENT highest peak is Mount Caubvick in Nfld.

 

> Major composition ? Granite? Nickel?

 

northernpenguin is mostly right. The Canadian Shield is composed of the roots of countless mountain chains, each overprinted by successive orogenies (aka mountain building events). Most of these rocks have the same composition that you would find if you could dig dip under present day mountains. At their tallest, many of the former mountains of the Canadian Shield had peaks that were taller than Mount Everest (but not at the same time). The oldest rock known in the Canadian Shield (and in the world) is the Acasta Gneiss (pronounced 'nice') of the Slave geological Province, has be dated at just over 4 billion years.

 

Also, what way do you mean how many years ago did they start to form? Do you mean, 'when did the rocks that eventually become uplifted into mountains accumulate' or do you mean 'when was the onset of uplift'? An example of this are the Canadian Rockies, where some of the rocks accumulated as sedimentary rocks in topographic basins over 1 billion years ago, yet uplift only started about 180 million years ago.

 

Finally, when you ask what is the major composition of the rock, do you mean of the range or of the peak itself?

 

Anyway, I've likely made this question more complicated than you intended. I'm going to guess you mean present-day mountain ranges, because you imply that the peak is still there. But by definition, a peak is a topographic high, whether it is at 200 m a.s.l. or 8000 m a.s.l., so in theory, it could be almost any old range.

 

So, long story short, I've gone and confused myself. Can you specify the question a bit?

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>Name the mountain range and approximately how many years ago they started to form.

>Name the highest peak.

>Name the major composition of the rock.

 

 

>The Canadian Shield is the oldest mountain range that I'm aware of. Used to be huge.

It's believed to be about 4.5 billion years old.

 

>Kinda confused on this one. Assuming you mean the highest peak that is still left in existence, as there wasn't anyone around back then to measure. They figure it was about 12,000 feet tall on average.

The CURRENT highest peak is Mount Caubvick in Nfld.

 

> Major composition ? Granite? Nickel?

 

northernpenguin is mostly right. The Canadian Shield is composed of the roots of countless mountain chains, each overprinted by successive orogenies (aka mountain building events). Most of these rocks have the same composition that you would find if you could dig dip under present day mountains. At their tallest, many of the former mountains of the Canadian Shield had peaks that were taller than Mount Everest (but not at the same time). The oldest rock known in the Canadian Shield (and in the world) is the Acasta Gneiss (pronounced 'nice') of the Slave geological Province, has be dated at just over 4 billion years.

 

Also, what way do you mean how many years ago did they start to form? Do you mean, 'when did the rocks that eventually become uplifted into mountains accumulate' or do you mean 'when was the onset of uplift'? An example of this are the Canadian Rockies, where some of the rocks accumulated as sedimentary rocks in topographic basins over 1 billion years ago, yet uplift only started about 180 million years ago.

 

Finally, when you ask what is the major composition of the rock, do you mean of the range or of the peak itself?

 

Anyway, I've likely made this question more complicated than you intended. I'm going to guess you mean present-day mountain ranges, because you imply that the peak is still there. But by definition, a peak is a topographic high, whether it is at 200 m a.s.l. or 8000 m a.s.l., so in theory, it could be almost any old range.

 

So, long story short, I've gone and confused myself. Can you specify the question a bit?

 

Ok, I've thought about it, and I'm going to go ahead and take a stab at this question. The Monashee Complex (near Revelstoke BC) of the Monashee Range in the Columbia Mountains (Kootenay region) are the oldest mountains that are still what we would call mountains. They are rocks of the Canadian Shield that stick up through the overlying rocks. The highest peaks of the complex is either the Frenchman's Cap, Thor, or Odin peak and their age is Paleoproterozoic (1.8 to 2.5 billion years old), but were caught up in Cordilleran deformation sometime during the Jurassic to Eocene (sometime between 200 and 50 million years ago). The rocks are gneisses, but I can't remember if they were once igneous or sedimentary in origin. That's the best guess off the top of my head (we can't look it up, right?).

 

You've probably guessed by now that I'm a (soon-to-be) geologist.

Edited by shearzone

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Like I said, I was taking a risk with this question! I think the question can still stand, but I need to give some clues.

 

1. This range started to form with the "Second Province." That is the second part of the Canadian Shield, after the "Superior Province." This happened at approximately the maximum age given in another answer above.

 

2. They are/were real mountains, formed by a tectonic plate collision, that started uplifting around the time mentioned above. Of course, if you had been around as long as this range you'd be worn down quite a bit, too.

 

3. A lot of the original range is gone, swallowed up by the Mid-Continental Rift of just over 1 billion years ago when North America tried to split in two.

 

4. I am going there on Tuesday, with the item from the answer that led me to ask this silly question.

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Like I said, I was taking a risk with this question! I think the question can still stand, but I need to give some clues.

 

1. This range started to form with the "Second Province." That is the second part of the Canadian Shield, after the "Superior Province." This happened at approximately the maximum age given in another answer above.

 

2. They are/were real mountains, formed by a tectonic plate collision, that started uplifting around the time mentioned above. Of course, if you had been around as long as this range you'd be worn down quite a bit, too.

 

3. A lot of the original range is gone, swallowed up by the Mid-Continental Rift of just over 1 billion years ago when North America tried to split in two.

 

4. I am going there on Tuesday, with the item from the answer that led me to ask this silly question.

 

Are you going to the Adirondaks of the Grenville Province? I haven't actually been there, but I'm going to guess that the major component of those rocks are granites. I don't know the name of the tallest peak, probably the name of some famous american.

Edited by shearzone

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Like I said, I was taking a risk with this question! I think the question can still stand, but I need to give some clues.

 

1. This range started to form with the "Second Province." That is the second part of the Canadian Shield, after the "Superior Province." This happened at approximately the maximum age given in another answer above.

 

2. They are/were real mountains, formed by a tectonic plate collision, that started uplifting around the time mentioned above. Of course, if you had been around as long as this range you'd be worn down quite a bit, too.

 

3. A lot of the original range is gone, swallowed up by the Mid-Continental Rift of just over 1 billion years ago when North America tried to split in two.

 

4. I am going there on Tuesday, with the item from the answer that led me to ask this silly question.

 

Are you going to the Adirondaks of the Grenville Province? I haven't actually been there, but I'm going to guess that the major component of those rocks are granites. I don't know the name of the tallest peak, probably the name of some famous american.

 

ooops, I forgot that the original question stated that the range was in Canada. I'm going to keep my answer within the Grenville Province, but change the range to the Laurentians. Again, I'm going to stick with granite as the major composition and I don't know the name of the tallest peak.

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Are we still looking for a right answer for this one?

Well, my understanding of the question can now be summed up as follows:

 

HUH?

 

... so I'm sorta holding out till the next one.

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Okay, I'm glad I'm not the only one thoroughly confused. Well I'll give Danoshimano 8 hours to come up with a question he knows the answer too otherwise I'm going to ask one of my dreaded questions. :)

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Okay, I'm glad I'm not the only one thoroughly confused. Well I'll give Danoshimano 8 hours to come up with a question he knows the answer too otherwise I'm going to ask one of my dreaded questions. :)

 

Hey, what are you talking about? I know the answer. The problem is that the question is too hard. Therefore, I will make it easier by posting a PICTURE. Yeah, that'll do the trick. But not right now, because I don't have the picture with me, since I am at work.

 

Let's review what everybody should already know from the posts:

 

- It's a mountain range that started to form 2.5 billion years ago.

- It's in Ontario.

- You can canoe there.

- There is something about the rock composition that is interesting enough that people who know the range would be able to identify the rock.

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Okay, I'm glad I'm not the only one thoroughly confused. Well I'll give Danoshimano 8 hours to come up with a question he knows the answer too otherwise I'm going to ask one of my dreaded questions. :)

 

Hey, what are you talking about? I know the answer. The problem is that the question is too hard. Therefore, I will make it easier by posting a PICTURE. Yeah, that'll do the trick. But not right now, because I don't have the picture with me, since I am at work.

 

Let's review what everybody should already know from the posts:

 

- It's a mountain range that started to form 2.5 billion years ago.

- It's in Ontario.

- You can canoe there.

- There is something about the rock composition that is interesting enough that people who know the range would be able to identify the rock.

 

RES2100's Silver peak comes to mind... made of quartz. I think you can canoe to it, but I was considering the hike last summer. Time ran out though

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RES2100's Silver peak comes to mind... made of quartz. I think you can canoe to it, but I was considering the hike last summer. Time ran out though

 

Bingo... almost.

 

You have named the highest peak. You have named the rock, or close enough (quartzite). Now just name the actual range...

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RES2100's Silver peak comes to mind... made of quartz. I think you can canoe to it, but I was considering the hike last summer. Time ran out though

 

Bingo... almost.

 

You have named the highest peak. You have named the rock, or close enough (quartzite). Now just name the actual range...

 

Gunflint?

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