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New 24 Hour Record For Finding Most Caches (312) Has Been Set


geoPirat
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If they didn't all sign their names in the logbooks, then what do those numbers REALLY mean?

Let's ask the expert...

 

ac2bfbff-6f76-4317-8dee-e5c05421f51e.jpg

Let's not go THERE, unless we are ready for a Grand Jury hearing, and hand out "punishment" for alleged crimes committed. :)

 

By the way, I hope y'all have consistent attitudes about baseball and Geocaching - can't complain about Bonds, and then say "everyone plays Geocaching his own way." :D

 

I do admire the new 24 hour record, but I'm boggled that they DNF'd more caches per day than the most I've found in a day! I am not boggled by "4.6 minutes per cache" since it's possible to get out of the car, find the cache, scribble a signature, and get back in the car under a minute in ideal conditions. I'm sure the engine on the van was always running, and so were the cachers!

Edited by budd-rdc
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By the way, I hope y'all have consistent attitudes about baseball and Geocaching - can't complain about Bonds, and then say "everyone plays Geocaching his own way." :D

 

Actually, yes, I can. Oh, and :D

Everyone knows Bonds is juiced, and while his numbers are impressive, they are tainted numbers, beyond any doubt.

Everyone knows you can play Geocaching the way you want, yes, but ONE fundamental rule still stands (on GC, Navi, or Terra): SIGN THE LOGBOOK. (and I don't care if you are on steroids when you sign, either, just as long as YOU sign it).

While I AM impressed that 312 caches were 'visited', I think most of us have all previously agreed at one time or another that you need to SIGN YOUR NAME in the logbook in order to claim the find.

 

If ONE person jumped out of the van and wrote 'DRR' on the logsheet, I just don't see how anyone could feel right about claiming a find on ANY of those caches. All 8 should have been signing individually, if they all want to get in on the 'World-Record' find, yet none of their names are even in the logbooks. Just 'DRR'.

So now I guess we are going to allow ONE signature count for all 8 teams. :)

 

Is that how you do it when you go caching with another team, whoever finds it just scribbles 'ABC123' on the logsheet, and then you tell everyone it stands for both teams???

 

Just my 2 cents. I know I will probably take some hits for saying that, but I will stick to my guns, as well as legit finds...

Edited by TEAM 360
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I found 240 caches with one other record-setter, with the support of a driver and navigator. We took a two-hour dinner break, a half-hour lunch break, a potty and get out of the thunderstorm break, and lots of breaks to admire nice views, take pictures, etc. We also chose to hunt for a few especially evil caches taking extra time.

 

I have no doubt that if we had skipped the long dinner party, and left caches with a DNF after searching for 5 minutes, we could easily have exceeded 300 cache finds in 24 hours.

 

The proof is in the large number of people who have now held the record, and who have proven that it can be done in three different cache-dense areas.

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We took a two-hour dinner break...

Would you like to tell the rest of us where you had this dinner? :) I still think it's funny.

I didn't choose the spot. I had never been in a Hooters restaurant prior to that evening, and have not been in one since!

 

EDIT: Woo hoo, my 6000th post! Sometimes it's all about the numbers. :D

Edited by The Leprechauns
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Everyone knows you can play Geocaching the way you want, yes, but ONE fundamental rule still stands (on GC, Navi, or Terra): SIGN THE LOGBOOK. (and I don't care if you are on steroids when you sign, either, just as long as YOU sign it).

While I AM impressed that 312 caches were 'visited', I think most of us have all previously agreed at one time or another that you need to SIGN YOUR NAME in the logbook in order to claim the find.

 

If ONE person jumped out of the van and wrote 'DRR' on the logsheet, I just don't see how anyone could feel right about claiming a find on ANY of those caches. All 8 should have been signing individually, if they all want to get in on the 'World-Record' find, yet none of their names are even in the logbooks. Just 'DRR'.

So now I guess we are going to allow ONE signature count for all 8 teams. :)

 

Is that how you do it when you go caching with another team, whoever finds it just scribbles 'ABC123' on the logsheet, and then you tell everyone it stands for both teams???

 

Just my 2 cents. I know I will probably take some hits for saying that, but I will stick to my guns, as well as legit finds...

 

One thing that you are overlooking is that many cache runs have over ten cars and twenty people. I remember one specific cache in Jacksonville, FL where there were at least 20 people looking for the cache and one person found the cache. Instead of filling the entire log with each individual name, one team name was placed in the cache log. By your rationale, only one person could actually log the cache while the other 19 that were looking for the cache are out of luck. If all 20 people signed the log, first, it would take a long time to have everyone sign the log and second, the log would be filled and for what purpose? Save a tree!!!

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Congrats on the accomplishment! I hope to meet everybody this weekend!

 

I was wondering if we know what the record is for a solo cacher in 24hrs?

 

The best I've been able to do was a 13 hour and 10 min run:

67 caches found

2 DNFs

64.4 miles total distance traveled

Of which 12.1 miles were hiking, not counting any distance from car to cache for park and grabs.

 

I looked for everything except for mystery/puzzle caches.

Edited by Roland_oso
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...Everyone knows you can play Geocaching the way you want, yes, but ONE fundamental rule still stands (on GC, Navi, or Terra): SIGN THE LOGBOOK. While I AM impressed that 312 caches were 'visited', I think most of us have all previously agreed at one time or another that you need to SIGN YOUR NAME in the logbook in order to claim the find.

So if a caching couple find one scribble their team name in the log book, neither of them can log it online to their individual accounts? Further, if I introduce my brother to the game and we find seven together, he can't later create an account for himself and log those finds?

If ONE person jumped out of the van and wrote 'DRR' on the logsheet, I just don't see how anyone could feel right about claiming a find on ANY of those caches.

I must have missed the log where it said that the rest of the team stayed in the van slurping milkshakes. Please point it out to me.

All 8 should have been signing individually, if they all want to get in on the 'World-Record' find, yet none of their names are even in the logbooks. Just 'DRR'.

So now I guess we are going to allow ONE signature count for all 8 teams. :)

Of course we are, because for the purpose of this cache run, they were one team.

Is that how you do it when you go caching with another team, whoever finds it just scribbles 'ABC123' on the logsheet, and then you tell everyone it stands for both teams???

It is not uncommon for two people to cache together and one of them writing either their team name in the book or both of their individual names in it. Why should we care about this?

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I'm a bit confused at all the comments about this not being impressive and suggesting that this is not in the spirit of geocaching. Forget the numbers, forget the logs, isn't it all about having fun? To me this sounds like a blast. Although I doubt I'd be up for the run itself, I'd certainly love to be able to say I assisted in this type of a run.

 

Congrats to all on setting the new record while having fun in the true spirit of geocaching!!

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I am not impressed with high number cache records in a 24 hour period. My reasons are quite simple.

THere are a lot more caches around than there were a year or two ago, most of the new casches I have seen in the past two years have been park and grabs.

 

Most of these records are set durring a cache blitz that invovles a large number of cachers all looking for the same cache at the same time, you you have 10 sets of eyes all looking at the same time sure it will only take a minute or two to find the cache.

 

Those of use that have been around geocaching for a while will remember how finding you first 100 caches was quite an undertaking 3 years ago, you would have to leave your car and do some hiking back then. Now a person can find 100 in a day or two just by doing drive up finds with a little planning.

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I must have missed the log where it said that the rest of the team stayed in the van slurping milkshakes. Please point it out to me.

 

I don't need to point it out to you. There isn't one. Didn't you read the part where I said 'if'?

Go back and read it again so you at least know what you're talking about.

 

Of course we are, because for the purpose of this cache run, they were one team.

 

Really? Because I ran a search for a GC.com registered team by the name of 'DRR', 'D.R.R.', 'Dallas Record Run', 'DallasRecordRun', etc, etc, etc...and didn't find any team by that name registered at the time of the 'world record'....so I guess we can just play it loose and fast as we go along...

 

It is not uncommon for two people to cache together and one of them writing either their team name in the book or both of their individual names in it. Why should we care about this?

 

I guess you don't. In fact, why bother to sign your name at all in the cache book?

Hey, I've got a great idea for you...just go ahead and claim a find on all the caches listed on this site, since you don't care about whether or not your name is actually on the logsheet... :)

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I think this is a great idea. The only thing I have seen that I think is wrong is in the rules that were posted to GeoWoodstock4.com..

 

3 ) has to stay together all the time -> after the start nobody can join the team but team members are free to quit during the run; no (!) splitting up of the team (caching in several groups) further than .5 miles; not every team member has to leave the vehicle for every cache as a cachecontainer can be found physically by only one person anyway

 

The .5 mile means that a team could find 3 or 4 at once and not all would be present at the one cache site. Several parks have many caches within .5 miles and to truely find XXX in 24 hours I don't think that the team should be able to find in parallel. (IMO)

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I must have missed the log where it said that the rest of the team stayed in the van slurping milkshakes. Please point it out to me.

 

I don't need to point it out to you. There isn't one. Didn't you read the part where I said 'if'?

Go back and read it again so you at least know what you're talking about.

 

Of course we are, because for the purpose of this cache run, they were one team.

 

Really? Because I ran a search for a GC.com registered team by the name of 'DRR', 'D.R.R.', 'Dallas Record Run', 'DallasRecordRun', etc, etc, etc...and didn't find any team by that name registered at the time of the 'world record'....so I guess we can just play it loose and fast as we go along...

 

It is not uncommon for two people to cache together and one of them writing either their team name in the book or both of their individual names in it. Why should we care about this?

 

I guess you don't. In fact, why bother to sign your name at all in the cache book?

Hey, I've got a great idea for you...just go ahead and claim a find on all the caches listed on this site, since you don't care about whether or not your name is actually on the logsheet... :)

On a micro or nano, I'll sign "Lep" if I'm alone, or "Leps" if I'm with my daughter, who has a separate account. Did we not find and log that cache? I don't see that any differently than signing "Team DRR" rather than filling up a tiny logsheet with 8 names. It's actually quite considerate to the cache owner.

 

Maybe I should start a thread about people who don't give cache owners the courtesy of an online log to let them know their cache was found. It would be off topic for this thread, though... as is hypothetical nitpicking of the record holders' caching practices. I thought this was a congratulations thread? :D

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I think this is a great idea. The only thing I have seen that I think is wrong is in the rules that were posted to GeoWoodstock4.com..

 

3 ) has to stay together all the time -> after the start nobody can join the team but team members are free to quit during the run; no (!) splitting up of the team (caching in several groups) further than .5 miles; not every team member has to leave the vehicle for every cache as a cachecontainer can be found physically by only one person anyway

 

The .5 mile means that a team could find 3 or 4 at once and not all would be present at the one cache site. Several parks have many caches within .5 miles and to truely find XXX in 24 hours I don't think that the team should be able to find in parallel. (IMO)

Yuck, I don't like that one bit. Every person claiming a find should be present at the cache site for that cache. Splitting up into small groups changes the dynamics.

 

EDIT to note that I have no idea whether the DRR group did this, because I wasn't there. I am just commenting on the published "rule," which I was unaware of until just now. Gosh, when I set the record I just found caches according to the same standards I'd always used. Pull up the waypoint on the GPS, get out of the car, find the cache, sign the log and move on. Quite simple.

Edited by The Leprechauns
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On a micro or nano, I'll sign "Lep" if I'm alone, or "Leps" if I'm with my daughter, who has a separate account. Did we not find and log that cache? I don't see that any differently than signing "Team DRR" rather than filling up a tiny logsheet with 8 names. It's actually quite considerate to the cache owner.

 

 

It's also much better than having them plaster the log with 8 individual stickers... :)

 

I hate having to replace logs in micros and find that there are several stickers that take up multiple lines...sometimes even wrapping around the log and taking up the back side as well!

 

Ok...sorry, way OT.

 

(Lep, you taught me a new term the other day. Maybe I should start a new thread about evil log hoggers and invoke "Godwin's Law"! ;) )

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Maybe I should start a thread about people who don't give cache owners the courtesy of an online log to let them know their cache was found. It would be off topic for this thread, though... as is hypothetical nitpicking of the record holders' caching practices. I thought this was a congratulations thread? ;)

 

You can start that thread with references to Dave Ulmer, if you like...or any of the hundreds, maybe thousands of cachers who don't log online...

Courtesy? I'll start leaving 'found it' logs when cachers get the COURTESY of not having their numbers openly displayed, instead of being FORCED into the numbers game every time they leave an online entry. (at one time, this option to hide stats was said to be 'coming soon', then retracted)

 

Every person claiming a find should be present at the cache site for that cache.

 

Exactly! That means EVERYBODY out of the van! What's so wrong with that? :)

 

rather than filling up a tiny logsheet with 8 names.

 

That's a stretch. 8 names will not fill up a logbook. :huh:

 

I have given my opinion of this.

Again, at least I know MY numbers are straight. I would not feel right claiming I found ANY of them, if 'TEAM 360' was not on EACH and EVERY logsheet, written by MYSELF. Sending someone else out to sign the logbook for you isn't really a find. If someone is too lazy to go sign a driveup micro themselves, they certainly shouldn't be going around bragging about setting some kind of 'world record'... ;)

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While I AM impressed that 312 caches were 'visited', I think most of us have all previously agreed at one time or another that you need to SIGN YOUR NAME in the logbook in order to claim the find.

 

If ONE person jumped out of the van and wrote 'DRR' on the logsheet, I just don't see how anyone could feel right about claiming a find on ANY of those caches. All 8 should have been signing individually, if they all want to get in on the 'World-Record' find, yet none of their names are even in the logbooks. Just 'DRR'.

So now I guess we are going to allow ONE signature count for all 8 teams. :)

 

Is that how you do it when you go caching with another team, whoever finds it just scribbles 'ABC123' on the logsheet, and then you tell everyone it stands for both teams???

 

Just my 2 cents. I know I will probably take some hits for saying that, but I will stick to my guns, as well as legit finds...

Actually yes, during the 2-4 times a year that I cache as part of Team CHB that is all we will sign the log with. Simce my profile includes the fact that I am a charter member of the team, I have no problem claiming those finds. And sometimes we don't even have to get out of the van if the driver is skillful enough. ;) Gotta love those sliding minivan doors. :)

 

Congrats again to the NEW WORLD RECORD HOLDERS. :huh:

I wonder if this one will last throught the weekend? ;)

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I am not impressed with high number cache records in a 24 hour period. My reasons are quite simple.

THere are a lot more caches around than there were a year or two ago, most of the new casches I have seen in the past two years have been park and grabs.

 

Most of these records are set durring a cache blitz that invovles a large number of cachers all looking for the same cache at the same time, you you have 10 sets of eyes all looking at the same time sure it will only take a minute or two to find the cache.

 

Those of use that have been around geocaching for a while will remember how finding you first 100 caches was quite an undertaking 3 years ago, you would have to leave your car and do some hiking back then. Now a person can find 100 in a day or two just by doing drive up finds with a little planning.

Restatement of a post I made elsewhere in this thread earlier, but with a nod toward the above quote.

 

I *AM* impressed by the high number cache record in a 24 hr period because I know how much prep work it takes to stage the run, and then how much focus and endurance it requires during the run. And the "fun factor" is impossible to measure.

 

Having said that, I wholeheartedly support the rest of JohnnyVegas's comments above. Since mid-'04, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, thanks to Micro Spew we are playing a different game from what it was pre mid-'04. And carrying the Barry Bonds analogy posted earlier, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, it's like playing in the steroid era - it's possible to run up way more stats with less effort now than it used to take, and so the stats compiled in the old era and the new era are not fairly comparable.

 

IF STATS MATTER TO YOU is the key caveat. If stats don't matter to you, this is a moot discussion.

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Those of use that have been around geocaching for a while will remember how finding you first 100 caches was quite an undertaking 3 years ago, you would have to leave your car and do some hiking back then. Now a person can find 100 in a day or two just by doing drive up finds with a little planning.

 

Things always change...

 

For example, look at kids today. They actually have a bus that takes them to school!

 

I used to have to walk 5 miles each way...through the snow...and it was uphill both ways! ;)

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Having said that, I wholeheartedly support the rest of JohnnyVegas's comments above. Since mid-'04, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, thanks to Micro Spew ™ we are playing a different game from what it was pre mid-'04. And carrying the Barry Bonds analogy posted earlier, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, it's like playing in the steroid era - it's possible to run up way more stats with less effort now than it used to take, and so the stats compiled in the old era and the new era are not fairly comparabl

 

Agreed. A few years ago 1,000+ finds was a major accomplishment and that number was only reached after a few years of geocaching. Now it seems everybody and their mother has 1,000+ finds and many people reach that number in their first year.

 

Still, 300+ caches in 24 hours is an accomplishment, I don't care how many guardrail micros they hit.

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My "record" high was 5 hours, 35 caches. None of which was extremely difficult or memorable, but we were out for a good time, not long hikes or spectacular views. There are a number of ways to play this game, I enjoy "micro runs" and long hikes to caches that take you somewhere special. Totally different goals, but both fun. And as I said before, if you're having fun, that's all that matters. Congrats to those involved with this new record -- I'm sure you had a blast! ;)

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Still, 300+ caches in 24 hours is an accomplishment, I don't care how many guardrail micros they hit.

I agree! About a year and half ago, RocketMan, Flagman and I wanted to see if we could find 100 caches in a day just for the heck of it. So we drove up to Palm Springs, which at that time was the "power caching" mecca of SC. RocketMan plotted out an E-Size cache map of the entire area including the terrain ratings (we ignored anything over 2.5). He then planned out a plan of attack, which included staging of our two vehicles in strategic points. Flagman printed out a bunch of nice stickers with our names and the date. FYI: the sticker took up less room on the log than our names. We all walked together, found the caches together and logged the caches together. Trust me, it was not easy keeping that pace for the ~10 hours it took us to find those 100 caches. We hiked over 10 miles so a van would have been nice! But to me it's incredible that anyone could find 300+ caches in 24 hours! My hat is off to ya! ;)

Edited by TrailGators
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The record has been broken! We shall now deploy our crack team of cache enforcement officers to each of the 312 sites to confirm logging meets the Officially recognized rules and regulations of the World Record Run attempt. Upon confirmation of these logs we will proudly present the Grand Prize, an all-expenses-paid trip to the Canary Islands!

 

Wait, what? There's no grand prize? What the...? Of course we have official ru- No? Ah heck. I guess we can just marvel at the amazing accomplishment of these fine gentlemen, and admire them for their determination, dedication, and downright fanaticism in the same spirit in which they attempted such a feat. Hats off to the lot of you!

 

Nate

 

Find me at GW4 and I'll give you a small prize (you can forget about the Canaries)

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OK folks, way too many side conversations / discussions / arguements that fall in the realm of tangent topics. If you wish to start a new thread to express your concerns, likes, dislikes, hypothetical scenarios, etc, feel free to do so.

 

Lets keep this one as a congrats thread.

 

Thanks

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Oh my!!! Do we sense an abundance of angst and querulousness amongst our extended geocaching family? :lol: Sweet Cache Run!!!! OH My!!! How Cool!! We look forward to beating this record someday!!! It may never happen, but it will be fun trying!!! <_< LOL We enjoy all types of caching; from a numbers run to a nice long stroll in the woods for a single cache. GeoPirate, we hope to see you back in the states before too long to hear all about this killer run! Congratulations!!!! TEZK.

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Sitting outside Tyler Texas after traveling from Lexington I am anxious to get some numbers, not break records, does a gpx exist of your run? I'd like to take my dad (GeoJimmie) on a #'s run. He is 69 so it would have to be doable. Getting 50 of those would be great for us. Having no clue about the area we'd be hard press to get more than 10-20 otherwise. If you have a gpx I'd owe you a big 'en. I have a new KY coin for ya'. Email: mrcraig101@hotmail.com

 

Maxine&Me

Lexington, KY

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Oh my!!! Do we sense an abundance of angst and querulousness amongst our extended geocaching family? :D Sweet Cache Run!!!! OH My!!! How Cool!! We look forward to beating this record someday!!! It may never happen, but it will be fun trying!!! <_< LOL We enjoy all types of caching; from a numbers run to a nice long stroll in the woods for a single cache. GeoPirate, we hope to see you back in the states before too long to hear all about this killer run! Congratulations!!!! TEZK.

 

Hi there!! Say I was wondering, have you been able to determine if they actually FOUND real physical caches or did they simply LOG 10 or so for every find? I think that that is a pretty important distinction to figure out, don't you? :lol::(:D

Edited by Team Cotati
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First, congratulations on the record run. It is an accomplishment now matter how you did it.

 

When I cache as part of Team CHB, we sign the log as Team CHB, not individuals so I have no problem with that practice.

However, we do sign the LOG. While caching in the DFW area the last couple of days, I've haven't seen that DRR signed any logs, they signed the outside of the cache containers. I assume this was to save a few seconds on each cache.

While I don't really agree with this, I have to pass on thanks because this has made at least a few caches easier to find. The black DDR makes some of the camos jobs substantially less effective. :lol:

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Is anyone going to attempt a record solo?

 

Just wondering. That would be an interesting run.

 

They would be the Charles Lindburgh of geocaching. Actually I don't think it would be possible without at least a driver. There should be a separate record for solo efforts.

Edited by briansnat
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Is anyone going to attempt a record solo?

 

Just wondering. That would be an interesting run.

 

They would be the Charles Lindburgh of geocaching. Actually I don't think it would be possible without at least a driver. There should be a separate record for solo efforts.

 

Well they did not count the driver in the group effort so the driver does not count.

 

I think a solo record run would be nice to see.

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I feel it is justified to add one opinion of my own.

 

I have done several caching events where we team up with others for said event and create a "TEAM NAME" to sign the logs. the last event I participated in I met up with another team that is over 100 miles from us, and we worked together as "Team Lost In The Woods" signed most of the logs as TLITW to save time as it was a TIMED EVENT. I am glad they had fun and if they were to ever come to my home area I would happily help them with another numbers run, it looks like alot of fun to me.

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Minor correction to team names,

 

The group of cachers:

Ed, The AlabamaRambler (AKA NatureFish)

Max, 'Poppy' of Nonnypoppy

Mike from Cache&Keri

Mike, 'Golf' from GolfNutz

Roland, darth_maul_3

Tammo, Spuchtfink

Michael, MZielinski

Carsten, geoPirat

 

All caches were signed DRR (Dallas Record Run) for the team.

 

Many thanks to all who helped put this together, and especially to my team-mates!

 

Four Germans, four Americans, a big van and lots of geocaches to find - now that's a recipe for a great weekend!

 

24 Hours (9 a.m. Saturday to 9 a.m. Sunday, we broke the old record in the 18th hour!)

312 Caches, (yes, we found every one - not one was logged without signing)

44 DNFs

312 Miles

More laughs than I can count

Lots of wonderful memories

= Priceless

 

Thanks,

Ed

 

Hold on, hold on...did all 8 cachers get in and out of a van at every stop so they can all sign the logbook? Or did just one person jump out and scribble 'DRR'?? I can't seem to find any cacher with the name DRR in the group...

 

If they didn't all sign their names in the logbooks, then what do those numbers REALLY mean?

Let's ask the expert...

 

ac2bfbff-6f76-4317-8dee-e5c05421f51e.jpg

 

In my mind, if only one person 'jumped out', the record is even MORE impressive. :tired::tired::lol:

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(sniP)..... they signed the outside of the cache containers. I assume this was to save a few seconds on each cache.

While I don't really agree with this, I have to pass on thanks because this has made at least a few caches easier to find. The black DDR makes some of the camos jobs substantially less effective. :tired:

 

:lol: For real?

edit: Nevermind, I see this thread is covering that subject.

Edited by MountainMudbug
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I'm rescinding my earlier "congrats". Signing the containers instead of the logs in them doesn't constitute a "find" -- unless all the cache owners cleared that action ahead of time. If my cache were vandalized that way, not only would I be very unhappy, buy I'd delete the found logs too. If you want to set a record, play by the established rules. :laughing:

 

I wish the best of luck to whatever team *really* breaks the old record, by doing things the right way.

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Actually I don't think it would be possible without at least a driver.

 

Why wouldn't it be possible without a driver? In fact, I think solo means just that, solo. A solo flight is one person in the plane. I probably wouldn't exclude a support staff like maybe to bring food or fuel, but they can't help with the navigation, transportation, or finding and replacing the caches.

 

However, I was thinking a person on a motorcycle would be able to do it easier than someone in a car. Many drive-ups would be even easier on a bike. It would be much more maneuverable, as well. A well planned itinerary on an autorouting navigation system could be used for a good number of finds. I think a combination of a well thought out route, an autorouting navigation system with the route planned, a PDA with cache descriptions sequentially paginated, and a hand held GPS with a fast nearest waypoint sort would be a very good combination.

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Actually I don't think it would be possible without at least a driver.

 

Why wouldn't it be possible without a driver? In fact, I think solo means just that, solo. A solo flight is one person in the plane. I probably wouldn't exclude a support staff like maybe to bring food or fuel, but they can't help with the navigation, transportation, or finding and replacing the caches.

 

However, I was thinking a person on a motorcycle would be able to do it easier than someone in a car. Many drive-ups would be even easier on a bike. It would be much more maneuverable, as well. A well planned itinerary on an autorouting navigation system could be used for a good number of finds. I think a combination of a well thought out route, an autorouting navigation system with the route planned, a PDA with cache descriptions sequentially paginated, and a hand held GPS with a fast nearest waypoint sort would be a very good combination.

 

Ace Flapperhacker found 90 caches in 18 1/2 hours of Solo caching. Here is the run down.

 

Yes it's true. Pearblossom/Little Rock/Palmdale/Lancaster.

I was at the first cache a few minutes after midnight. I got to the last one at 9:18 PM.

I met the LA county Sheriffs at 12:30 AM. I met a USAF MP near where they mfg the Space Shuttle and Fighters and Bombers.

3 sets of GPS batteries, 1 rechargeable Streamlight "Boxlight", 2 peanut butter sandwiches, 2 bologna sandwiches, 2 Snickers bars, 3 Male Hersey bars (with nuts), 1 quart of coffee, 4 Diet Pepsi.

One hour wasted near Apollo park with road closures and construction sites and the park being closed for some fishing tourny.

One hour wasted when my F-250 4 x 4 got terminally stuck in some mud.

Somewhere in the vicinity of 30 DNF's. About 25 "Did not try".

170 miles of driving and about 40 gallons of gas.

 

I verified that he actualled signed the logbook on all of my caches that he found.

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Here's hoping someone who doesn't like your crappy caches removes them as well.

 

Well it's not a problem then because ed doesn't have ANY crappy caches.

 

But this thread is really about a 24 hour caching record. Actually this thread should be locked because there wasn't a record actually set here. Just a bunch of graffiti "artists" who should be ashamed of themselves.

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I am not impressed with high number cache records in a 24 hour period. My reasons are quite simple.

THere are a lot more caches around than there were a year or two ago, most of the new casches I have seen in the past two years have been park and grabs.

 

Most of these records are set durring a cache blitz that invovles a large number of cachers all looking for the same cache at the same time, you you have 10 sets of eyes all looking at the same time sure it will only take a minute or two to find the cache.

 

Those of use that have been around geocaching for a while will remember how finding you first 100 caches was quite an undertaking 3 years ago, you would have to leave your car and do some hiking back then. Now a person can find 100 in a day or two just by doing drive up finds with a little planning.

Restatement of a post I made elsewhere in this thread earlier, but with a nod toward the above quote.

 

I *AM* impressed by the high number cache record in a 24 hr period because I know how much prep work it takes to stage the run, and then how much focus and endurance it requires during the run. And the "fun factor" is impossible to measure.

 

Having said that, I wholeheartedly support the rest of JohnnyVegas's comments above. Since mid-'04, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, thanks to Micro Spew we are playing a different game from what it was pre mid-'04. And carrying the Barry Bonds analogy posted earlier, IF STATS MATTER TO YOU, it's like playing in the steroid era - it's possible to run up way more stats with less effort now than it used to take, and so the stats compiled in the old era and the new era are not fairly comparable.

 

IF STATS MATTER TO YOU is the key caveat. If stats don't matter to you, this is a moot discussion.

 

I'm just glad that I wasn't around before november 2004. I've only experienced post spew caching. I understand that caching was more challenging before the spew but we can't go back. It just seems that by your standards I will ALWAYS be substandard to you because all of my finds are post spew, My numbers will ALWAYS be in question because you happened to learn about this wonderful sport before I did. I like you drat but everytime you talk about the spew and how numbers don't matter after that I hear my grandpa and the uphill in snow both ways talk. Anyway. I'd still love to go caching with you to hear your "war stories" :ph34r:

 

edited to correct speling

Edited by erikwillke
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Actually I don't think it would be possible without at least a driver.

 

Why wouldn't it be possible without a driver? In fact, I think solo means just that, solo. A solo flight is one person in the plane. I probably wouldn't exclude a support staff like maybe to bring food or fuel, but they can't help with the navigation, transportation, or finding and replacing the caches.

 

However, I was thinking a person on a motorcycle would be able to do it easier than someone in a car. Many drive-ups would be even easier on a bike. It would be much more maneuverable, as well. A well planned itinerary on an autorouting navigation system could be used for a good number of finds. I think a combination of a well thought out route, an autorouting navigation system with the route planned, a PDA with cache descriptions sequentially paginated, and a hand held GPS with a fast nearest waypoint sort would be a very good combination.

 

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. Didn't make much sense to me either. :ph34r::huh::huh:

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While caching in the DFW area the last couple of days, I've haven't seen that DRR signed any logs, they signed the outside of the cache containers. I assume this was to save a few seconds on each cache.

While I don't really agree with this, I have to pass on thanks because this has made at least a few caches easier to find. The black DDR makes some of the camos jobs substantially less effective. :ph34r:

Looks like this thread should be titled "New 24 Hour Record For Finding and VANDALIZING Most Caches (312) Has Been Set"

 

:huh:

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