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The All New Groundspeak Uk Pub Quiz!


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Please construct a sentence or passage that has the same word repeated 5 times in a row and still makes grammatical sense. There are several options, if you manage the 5, someone else can trump this by going for 6/7/8/9/10 or 11. I know of none longer than 11.

 

If there's no answers by, say 2pm I'll post a clue.

 

No cheating using names - I won't accept this type of thing - "John called for his dog Tin Tin. "Tin tin, Tin Tin, here boy" or Fred changed his name to "Adrian Adrian Adrian Adrian Adrian"

 

Good luck

Edited by Kitty Hawk
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A signwritee writes a sign:

 

"George and Co."

 

A passer by notices an error:

 

The spaces between "George" and "and" and "and" and "Co." are different!

 

Edited to correct stoopid typo.

Edited by rutson
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A signwritee writes a sign:

 

"George and Co."

 

A passer by notices an error:

 

The spaces between "George" and "and" and "and" and "Co." are different!

Drat, and just when I thought I could use that hoary old teacher joke that goes:

James, while John had had "had", had had "had had"; "had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.

:)<_<:huh:

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EDIT - in Ian's absense I'll pose a question - where does the word 'Soccer' come from?

A contraction of Association football

Can't be that simple, so on the basis that Rugby is Rugger, and Socker is a varient spelling of Soccer I would think that at the time of the great to carry v to kick debate in the 1850s those that favoured the Rugby School rules (carry, trip, hack) refered to those that prefered to kick (ie sock the ball) as playing Socker rather than Rugger. :laughing:

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It's OK Rutson, but don't do it again :anicute::ph34r: You working away again?

 

The DING goes to Bongtwashes. Well done.

 

In the 1880s students of Oxford university abbreviated words by adding "er" to the end; for instance, breakfast became "brekkers" and "rugby rules" was referred to as "rugger." When one student, Charles Wreford Brown, was asked if he'd like to play rugger, he was the first to abbreviate "association rules" (Football Association rules) by answering, "No, soccer." Brown later bacame an England international and Football Association vice-president.

 

Adrian

Edited by Kitty Hawk
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In the 1880s students of Oxford university abbreviated words by adding "er" to the end; for instance, breakfast became "brekkers" and "rugby rules" was referred to as "rugger." When one student, Charles Wreford Brown, was asked if he'd like to play rugger, he was the first to abbreviate "association rules" (Football Association rules) by answering, "No, soccer." Brown later bacame an England international and Football Association vice-president.

Good on ya Bongwashes :D , but while we wait perhaps Kitty Hawk could provide a little more info and check out Rutson's contribution on the Word Association Football tread! :D

 

Just been googling and would appreciate some amplification on your explanation specifically:

  • Why was Socker, until very recently the preferred "English" spelling as atested by the OED?
  • The earliest recorded record of Soccer is 1895 but Socker predates that by 30 years, why sock rather than socc?
  • Was Charles Wreford Brown the earliest example of a time traveller or is this just another example of folk etymology?

Personally I've no idea of how to explain the late arrival of the Soccer spelling though one explanation I have seen suggests that Socker actually referred to a particular Association of Schools who also just happened to be in the non Rugby School camp and who banned the carrying of the ball (and professional fouls). Interestingly here in East Anglia traditional football (two large and violent gangs & a pigs bladder packed with straw) was known as camping so maybe football players should be known as campers and throwing a strop when booked known as camping it up and if someone prefers football to any other pastime we could say that they are a bit camp! :anicute::D:ph34r:

 

[write out 100 times Jango must improve his spilling}

Edited by Jango & Boba Fett
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i think that Pooh was also known as Mr Saunders, although I'm not sure about that.

 

My question:

 

Where was the Magna Carta signed?

 

I think I remember seeing that on the "3 Men in a Boat" programme recently. I think it was a small island on the river Thames but I can't remember the name of it. Maybe someone else will know :anicute:

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i think that Pooh was also known as Mr Saunders, although I'm not sure about that.

 

My question:

 

Where was the Magna Carta signed?

A a trick question at last. :anicute:

 

The answer is of course that although King John and the Barons did end up on Runnymeade Island in 1215 John didn't actually sign the document in question, but attacked his great seal. In fact there is some debate over whether John was literate at all, as there are no documents with his signature on them. However, this may just have been a ruse on his part - see King John's All Washed Up GCV89Y for more details.

 

Chae

Edited by Jango & Boba Fett
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I think Jango and Boba Fett are right, but just to expand - I don't think it was signed by anyone at all, literate or not. It was witnessed and the Kings Stamp was there to prove to the largely illiterate public that the king accepted it. The kings stamp would carry more authority than his signature.

 

So my answer would be "It wasn't signed at all at Runnymead"

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Runnymede?

 

Correct. Your turn.

 

(of course, I was expecting someone to say "at the bottom"!)

 

I don't know about whether he signed it or not, but that's the answer on the card.

What is Britain's only really coastal national park?
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