Jump to content

Snakes


Followers 3

Recommended Posts

Just a reminder to pay attention. I was taking the trash can out to the road last Friday when suddenly something hit me hard on my left calf. I looked down and there was a Copperhead snake. I jumped back and pulled up my pants leg...no bite. I'm still trying to understand this. I don't know if he missed, or struck whith his mouth closed? Either way, after I got over my near heart attack....he had a bad day.

 

So pay attention out there! Also...don't kill every snake you see. The majority are good snakes.

 

El Diablo

Edited by El Diablo
Link to comment

I still haven't seen one snake this year. The FTF on my recently placed cache saw one though. Pile of rocks = snakes, always check. I always "snake-kick' rocks before overturning them. Not sure if that ACTUALLY works, but it makes me feel better. At least there aren't any snakes on a plane! :smile:

Link to comment

Just a reminder to pay attention. I was taking the trash can out to the road last Friday when suddenly something hit me hard on my left calf. I looked down and there was a Copperhead snake. I jumped back and pulled up my pants leg...no bite. I'm still trying to understand this. I don't know if he missed, or struck whith his mouth closed? Either way, after I got over my near heart attack....he had a bad day.

 

So pay attention out there! Also...don't kill every snake you see. The majority are good snakes.

 

El Diablo

 

Yesterday at 7am, there was a 'possum in my yard. This is an nocturnal animal out in broad daylight.

 

Experience tells me that people need to be careful.

 

In short, if you see something besides a chipmunk or robin or, you know...be careful.

Edited by BlueDeuce
Link to comment

In my experiences, snakes are rare when cold, but even in January, if the sun shines, snakes may come out to the warmth, ive seen them while caching. Ive been very fortunate not to come across a poisonous snake while caching, just hope i see it before i step or reach, cause they are usually very well camoflauged. :unsure:

Link to comment

Came across a Rat Snake yesterday in Crowley, TX. I must have stepped over it, and as I turned looking for possible cashe hiding spots, there it was, head sticking out of the long grass onto the path. Also, saw a few Water Moccasins getting to an Island cache over the weekend. Good thing I found the cache first, or that trip would have been aborted at the sight of the first one. Lets be careful out there.

Link to comment

Went geocaching the other weekend out here in Far West Texas, was looking around in a large section of cactus for the hidden cache, when I here the sound of rattling. Look behind me see the cache and a rattlesnake. Had me a quick heart attack said a prayer and got out, seeing as how I didn't want to die or test death, I aborted the cache for another day.

Texas Geocachers, it is prime snake season, be extremely careful.

Link to comment

I ran across a snake a couple weeks back while hiking out to check on some of our caches. A young family had stopped and the toddler girl on her dad's shoulders was whimpering a bit so I ask what was wrong. The dad pointed out a snake a few feet off the trail, but I couldn't spot it right away. So he takes one step closer - just one step - so he could point it out a bit better.... and WHAAAAAAAHHHHHH!! That girl started wailing hysterically. I did spot the snake then - it was about 15 feet away and slithering away by then, but that girl still didnt want to be anywhere near it. I'm not sure what kind of snake it was - I had seen prarie rattlers around here before and they look a lot different than the diamondbacks I grew up around back in NorCal where I grew up. This snake looked very similar to a prarie rattler, but it was obviously not a venomous snake. It was easily over 6 feet long though and the most fearsome creature in existance to at least one little girl.

Link to comment

How effective are those snakebite kits you can get at a camping store? It has a scalpel, antibiotic ointment, some sucker things, and a little lasso type deal to surround the swell. I sure hope I never get bitten, but I thought I should get one just for posterity's sake.

Link to comment

Encountered a rattlesnake recently on, of all places, Galveston beach near the west end of the island. Was out there on Spring Break in March with my family. They played in the waves while I set off about 1.2 mile down the beach to find this cache. Was about 30 feet from the cache and about to step off the beach access trail onto a sand dune when I hear this loud hissing sound - I let out a frightened squeal, jumped backwards onto the trail (good thing nobody was driving in at the time!), shuddered with fright, and then took a few more involuntary steps backwards. The snake was only about 2 1/2 feet long but it had definitely seen me first and was going ballistic! After I'd composed myself a bit, I approached tentatively from the other side but didn't find the cache - there was new construction going on in the area and it had probably already been dislodged or muggled. Haven't seen anyone else attempt this one since I posted my DNF. Not too surprising, I suppose - who'd want the distinction of being the first geocacher bitten by a rattlesnake while vacationing on Galveston Island?!! :laughing:

Link to comment

I had two snake encounters last Sunday.

 

The first was with this rosy boa:

 

39de8118-7e5e-4a5e-aa73-de405ff38a00.jpg

 

The really interesting thing about this encounter was the way the snake appeared. As part of our group walked by, this "ball" of snake rolled down the embankment and into the middle of the trail. The "ball" stayed there for a while, and, from a distance, because of its color, it looked like a large pile of dog poo . . . :laughing:

 

Then, the snake very slowly uncoiled itself and finally, very slowly moved off the trail and back up the embankment.

 

A little later we saw this rattlesnake. It rattled before we saw it and then it moved away from us. It didn't want a confrontation . . . and neither did we.

 

7a758ee5-fd8a-4f70-be46-c1cb9226c4ba.jpg

Link to comment

Good thing I live in Michigan (Detroit), the only thing I have to worry about is mosquitoes and humidity :sad:

 

I would suggest looking up the Eastern Massasauga! Nothing to fear when hiking, but important to be aware that they are around in wet areas. Just had a sighting of one near us yesterday.

Link to comment

How effective are those snakebite kits you can get at a camping store? It has a scalpel, antibiotic ointment, some sucker things, and a little lasso type deal to surround the swell. I sure hope I never get bitten, but I thought I should get one just for posterity's sake.

 

They shouldn't even be sold. Everyone agrees that the last thing you should do is cut into the bite, as it doesn't effectively remove any venom and simply adds insult to injury. Plus, you end up messing around with that when you should be headed to the nearest ER.

Link to comment

 

snip... So pay attention out there! Also...don't kill every snake you see. The majority are good snakes.

 

El Diablo

 

No reason to kill any snake you see. We watched a copperhead Monday afternoon while we were out caching. He is still free to eat mice and rats to his heart's content.

Link to comment

Well I came across my first one today. It was beside me and I didn't see it. My husband had to point it out. I am very very fearful of them and have a little phobia as well. I froze and my husband had to yell at me to get me to come out. I never found the cache I was looking for, but I did continue to look. At that moment, I was trying to decide just how much I like caching. I pray that I can get past my fear so I can continue this sport, I love it. Oh by the way, thank goodness it was probably just a grass snake. It was solid green and on a very thin weed. I would have never known it was there on the weed. It blended in well.

 

Sharnie

Link to comment

Me an my wife went to get this cache I use to live in this area and new about the snakes. On our hike we ended up seeing 3 snakes, a common racer, a bull snake and a western rattlesnake. It is posted all around the area to be aware of rattlesnakes. I guess its the season.

 

Sorry...I qouted the wrong person.

 

El Diablo

Edited by El Diablo
Link to comment

 

snip... So pay attention out there! Also...don't kill every snake you see. The majority are good snakes.

 

El Diablo

 

No reason to kill any snake you see. We watched a copperhead Monday afternoon while we were out caching. He is still free to eat mice and rats to his heart's content.

 

I hate to kill anything, but he struck first. I'm not going to be fearful walking around in my own yard. Had I encountered him on the trail, I would have let be. As much as I love nature and all of it's creatures, my first thought is for the safety of my family.

 

If you are a snake and you make a strike at me...you are going to have a bad day.

 

El Diablo

Link to comment

Most exciting DNF ever. Feeling around in a big flower pot

I felt something soft.A Russell's Pit Viper, (responsible for 30% of all fatal bites in Thailand).Took some pix.

I left him/her alone and was in conversation with a superstitious French guy, when the viper, about thumb thick and 2 feet long was seen making it's way to my pushbike. He likes you said the guy. We watched it go into some leaves.I was telling the guy that one "Sammi the Cat" had set the cache, when I felt a bunt on my calf. My Heart Rate Monitor went into overdrive as I leapt away, thinking the viper had made a sighting strike.

It was a CAT. The French guy insisted that "Sammi" was "with" us.It is a temple area.

When I got back to look at my pix of the viper..no vipers in the memory, only of Sammi when he was here...go figger.

It's gonna remain a DNF.

 

this is a copy of my log..question is "Where were you Sammi on the night of....."?

Link to comment

Being in Florida, it says warm most of the year, so its pretty much always snake season. Last month, while walking around a Nature preserve in north tampa, I came across a pygmy rattler, tiny little thing, sitting in the middle of the trail. Thier rattles are so small that they sound like a bug buzzing if you can hear it at all so they are extra dangerous.

 

Always carry a stick/hiking staff with you, Always poke and prod the cache a few times before sticking your hand into the hiding spot to make sure nothing extra is hiding there as well.

Link to comment

Yes, snakebite kits are worthless and, as stated, waste valuable time and simply open you up to infection, etc. I don't know how much good kicking a rock does, but when lifting rocks or other items, lift toward you so the "opening" is away from you. Anything underneath is more likely to then be moving away from you to escape rather than toward you! And reaching blindly into holes or brush or whatever is always a dicey operation!

Link to comment

While I haven't found any while caching, our cat has been catching many in the backyard. Being the proud hunter, she always brings them in the house to show the family.

 

642ea44c-87c3-4e84-8268-80512d32b7d3.jpg

 

My first reaction to the photo was.. Oh, someone else has to remove snakes from their livingroom from time to time. We live in an old stone house so there are ways for snakes to get in if they choose to. Our house guest list over the last 35 years includes Ring Necks, Milk Snakes, and Garter Snakes. Most have been set free outside, but sometimes the baby ringnecks that hatch in the basement get caught up in the cobwebs and dry out before we find them. Snakes are just part of our world... live and let live.

Link to comment

We had a big discussion on snakes here in the Houston area recently. Personally, I've been in the outdoors most of my life(I'm 60), having grown up in the country in Tennessee and working outdoors on the farm until I joined the military. Being that there were copperheads all round us, I was taught to leave ALL snakes alone. Before moving to Texas I did a lot of hiking and backpacking and a lot of ridgewalking looking for caves. Personally, I have seen very few snakes in the woods and most of those have been non-venomous. I've found a copperhead in our basement in Kentucky and found a dead one in our front yard here in Texas a few days ago. (It had probably died of dehydration, it's been so dry.) When I am in the woods, I ALWAYS keep my eyes on the ground and watch where I am about to put my feet. The snake experts also advise making a lot of noise so the snakes will know you are coming and move away from you. Most snake bites are the result of the snake feeling cornered, sometimes after someone has stepped on or close to it.

 

As far as snakebite kits go, current conventional wisdom is not to use them. But current conventional wisdom is also not to give someone who is choking a tracheotomy. I'd say it depends on how far you are from medical attention, and how venemous the snake is. The only snake in the US that is deadly is the coral snake, but they have no fangs and you have to just about pick one up and let it chew on you for its venom to be ingested.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 3
×
×
  • Create New...