Jump to content

Geocaching And War Driving


Tonylama
Followers 1

Recommended Posts

I found myself trying to solve a puzzel cache yesterday and I was bumping my head on stage one... With my spirits low, I returned to my vehicle - thinking I would need to go home and view the page and instruction (no print-out in hand).

 

Then I realized - I'm sitting in a small business park - "I bet someone has an unsecured network around here..." :anibad:

 

Fired up the laptop... Worked like a champ!

 

Has anyone else ever done this?

 

NOTE WELL: Just in case there are any applicable state or federal regulations which prohibit this sort of conduct/connection.... I just want to say...

 

...Why does my post say Tonylama? :lol:

Link to comment

I'm not wireless yet, but I will be in the next couple of weeks. Rather than worry about the legalities of wardriving, if I took a roadtrip I'd plan on researching legal hotspots. For starters, I'd consult the Wi-Fi Hotspots category at Waymarking.com. More than 100 hotspots have been recorded already. It is the #1 ranked category for popularity, and there has to be a reason for that. I think it's all those geocachers who need to check for new caches, update data, log finds, send e-mails to cache owners, etc.!!!

Link to comment

To add to Leprechaun's post. I googled wireless hotspots in LV and came up with several sites. There was duplication, of course; but some sites had free locations not listed elsewhere. I found about 6-7 near the spots I was planning to cache. As it turned out, I didn't need them, but there were plenty available.

Link to comment

Just to clarify, Wardriving is searching for Wi-Fi wireless networks by moving vehicle. [Wikipedia]

 

Unauthorized access to a wireless network is a little different. We run periodic security scans of the surrounding area and try to raise the public's awareness of the dangers of unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Our scanning is completely legal since we do not access the network.

 

However, if you were to access the network as the OP speaks theoretically :) of, then you have crossed the line and are subject to prosecution in many areas.

 

As has been suggested, you are safer and a better net neighbor if you mark a few hotspots in the area in advance.

Link to comment

Just to clarify, Wardriving is searching for Wi-Fi wireless networks by moving vehicle. [Wikipedia]

 

Unauthorized access to a wireless network is a little different. We run periodic security scans of the surrounding area and try to raise the public's awareness of the dangers of unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Our scanning is completely legal since we do not access the network.

 

However, if you were to access the network as the OP speaks theoretically ;) of, then you have crossed the line and are subject to prosecution in many areas.

 

As has been suggested, you are safer and a better net neighbor if you mark a few hotspots in the area in advance.

 

Programs like Netstumbler are active WiFi scanners and DO attempt to access the network. They also don't find networks with the SSID turned off. Other non-WinDoze tools do a passive scan -- the WiFi card only listens.

 

Using another's WiFi connection without permission would be the same as finding a phone plugged in on someone's back porch and making a few free calls. A public WiFi hotspot is the way to go.

Link to comment

Wardriving can actually be quite a fun geocaching supplement! In fact, I even wrote a short tutorial about how to map wireless access points using NetStumbler and a program called JiGLE. If you are interested in trying this yourself, a sample map and a step-by-step guide can be found at http://adventuresingeocaching.blogspot.com...aching-map.html.

Yes, my own AP is listed on this map. Please remember, that accessing someone's private network is illegal. However, simply drawing a map of publicly broadcast radio signals is not.

Adventures in Geocaching: WiFi Caching Map

Link to comment

Using another's WiFi connection without permission would be the same as finding a phone plugged in on someone's back porch and making a few free calls. A public WiFi hotspot is the way to go.

 

Really...??? An unsecured WiFi network with a broadcasting SSID is pretty much fair game. Especially if I expect free WiFi (Hotel, Coffeeshop, etc) in the area. If I see a bunch of linksys and unknowns I really don't care who's it is. The strongest unsecured signal with net access is my choice. If you don't want your WiFi used without permission use WEP, don't broadcast your SSID, protect your network ...

 

I see WiFi access like trespassing on property. If you don't want me on your property build a fence, or post some sign, or make it obvious some other way that this is private property.

Link to comment

Using another's WiFi connection without permission would be the same as finding a phone plugged in on someone's back porch and making a few free calls. A public WiFi hotspot is the way to go.

 

Really...??? An unsecured WiFi network with a broadcasting SSID is pretty much fair game. Especially if I expect free WiFi (Hotel, Coffeeshop, etc) in the area. If I see a bunch of linksys and unknowns I really don't care who's it is. The strongest unsecured signal with net access is my choice. If you don't want your WiFi used without permission use WEP, don't broadcast your SSID, protect your network ...

 

I see WiFi access like trespassing on property. If you don't want me on your property build a fence, or post some sign, or make it obvious some other way that this is private property.

 

I think you are on the money. Accessing something that is floating around in the air is very different than tresspassing on to ones property, coming on to their porch and plugging in.

 

If you don't want me to use your WiFi connection don't put it in my vehicle.

 

I see it more as a person's expectation to privacy. If you are doing something on your front lawn people are likely to see it. Go and do it in the privacy of your bedroom. And even then if you are going to leave the light on people walking by on the sidewalk are going to see, so close the shade.

 

Some people are actually OK with putting their WiFi signal out there for people to use, and I guess some are not. The only way I can tell the difference is if they put some kind of security on it. If one hacks around the security fine different story. But if it is not secured it looks like a public WiFi hotspot to me.

Link to comment

I'm currently running a cabled network in my house, but since I'm starting some major interior renovations over the next few years causing the computers to need to be moved a few times that will become a pain. My brother has been telling me to go wireless for over a year now, and I may finally have to. One thing I have already decided is that when I do go wireless, I will open up internet access (and ONLY internet access) to anyone who happens to be able to receive the signal.

 

On a sidenote: When I'm over at my parents' and need the internet while someone else is already on the computer, I usually just grab my brother's laptop. Turns out one of the neighbours has an unsecures wireless router. I have no clue if they are aware of it, though.

 

Edit: spalling

Edited by Blue Bomb
Link to comment

The problem with WiFi is that many high-speed internet providers give away a wired / wireless router with their DSL or cable modem, and by default security is turned off. SBC Yahoo! seems to ship their 2Wire routers with WEP on, but others do not. Many manufacturers have added features to make setting up encryption easier, since it seems to be difficult for the average user.

 

I recently surveyed our neighborhood patrol area to do a presentation on WiFi security, and within about an eight square mile area I found 855 access points, with almost half unsecured. Most of the remainder had WEP enabled, and a few were using WPA or some of the other shared-key encryption schemes. Most had SSID broadcast enabled -- less than 1% were what I would call very secure.

 

As for SSID broadcast, while NetStumbler won't see them, there are other tools that will snag the SSID if you monitor long enough, and even work out the MAC addresses of all devices attached to the network. If they are using WEP and have a considerable amount of network traffic, you can even eventually get the WEP key -- it may take a hours to days though.

Link to comment

Wardriving can actually be quite a fun geocaching supplement! In fact, I even wrote a short tutorial about how to map wireless access points using NetStumbler and a program called JiGLE. If you are interested in trying this yourself, a sample map and a step-by-step guide can be found at http://adventuresingeocaching.blogspot.com...aching-map.html.

Yes, my own AP is listed on this map. Please remember, that accessing someone's private network is illegal. However, simply drawing a map of publicly broadcast radio signals is not.

Adventures in Geocaching: WiFi Caching Map

 

I got NetStumbler downloaded, but aren't sure which JiGLE file to download, Java or Windows. I'm running XP. :mad:

Link to comment

 

I got NetStumbler downloaded, but aren't sure which JiGLE file to download, Java or Windows. I'm running XP. :rolleyes:

 

The Java client, JiGLE, seems to work so much better than the Windows client, DiGLE. For this reason, my instructions are for the Java version. Of course, this means that you'll have to have the latest version of the Java Runtime Env. installed on your machine which you can download from java.com.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 1
×
×
  • Create New...