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Remember When?


El Diablo
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... Back then the owners wanted you to find their caches.

 

 

Thanks for saying that. I get frustrated with the "Let's see how deceptive I can be so nobody can find my cache" school of thought. I know there are those that like that type of hide so I'm not going to bash them, they are just not for me.

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:anibad:

 

I remember when there were NO caches in the Commonwealth of PA so I made the first one with every intention of hiding it 'tomorrow'. Well, tomorrow became a week and a week a month and then SEVERAL months and soon somebody beat me too it.

 

If I had gotten that one out I would probably post a bronze plaque there like the one in Oregon.

 

I also remember several 1:1 spats with Jeremy and the days BEFORE CCCooperAgency ruled the world.

 

One other significant difference between the "old days" and now is the quality of the cache items. It was a rare cache that contained muddy golf balls found on the way in, lint from someone's pocket or other utterly worthless junk. Trading was an honorable endeavor in the early days.

 

Sincerely,

PULASKI

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... Back then the owners wanted you to find their caches.

 

 

Thanks for saying that. I get frustrated with the "Let's see how deceptive I can be so nobody can find my cache" school of thought. I know there are those that like that type of hide so I'm not going to bash them, they are just not for me.

Aaah, the good ole' days when all the caches were after a nice walk/hike, and they were huge, and under a pile of obvious rocks.

 

*sigh*

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My first FTF (which was my second find - I didn't even OWN a GPS at the time!) was GC20D1 and it was last found 4 days ago. Nice to know it's still there! There are 121 logs posted now!

 

I remember when, at least around here, the first page of cache listings took you out to a radius of more than 30 miles. Now that first page goes all the way out to 3.1 miles.

 

But you know what? It's still fun!

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One other significant difference between the "old days" and now is the quality of the cache items. It was a rare cache that contained muddy golf balls found on the way in, lint from someone's pocket or other utterly worthless junk. Trading was an honorable endeavor in the early days.

 

I've been around for a while and I still don't remember those "old days". The first caches I found were filled with junk. At least in my area I've noticed a considerable improvement as far as cache contents over the years.

 

Also, when I started, most caches were in Gladware or other throw away containers. Ammo boxes have since become the standard in this area.

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I remember when geocaching was more about going places and seeing things and less about finding stuff and how many.

 

I remember when I was impressed when somebody had 100 finds. Now I wonder how many guardrails and lightposts they probably kissed and why.

 

I remember when geocaching was more hiking in the woods and less riding around in the car.

 

I remember when there were no micros.

 

I remember when geocachers were more outdoorsy and less nerdy.

 

I remember when people hid caches one at a time.

 

I remember when caches were caches (i.e. supposed to be found) instead of "evil" hides.

 

I don't remember practicing "stealth" or playing the dodge the muggle game.

 

I remember enthusiastically signing up to be a charter member to support the website. Now I resent having to pay for pocket queries so that I have a means to filter out the junk.

 

I remember when there was less quantity and more quality.

 

I remember when geocaching was a lot more fun.

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I remember when geocaching was more about going places and seeing things and less about finding stuff and how many.

 

I remember when I was impressed when somebody had 100 finds. Now I wonder how many guardrails and lightposts they probably kissed and why.

 

I remember when geocaching was more hiking in the woods and less riding around in the car.

 

I remember when there were no micros.

 

I remember when geocachers were more outdoorsy and less nerdy.

 

I remember when people hid caches one at a time.

 

I remember when caches were caches (i.e. supposed to be found) instead of "evil" hides.

 

I don't remember practicing "stealth" or playing the dodge the muggle game.

 

I remember enthusiastically signing up to be a charter member to support the website. Now I resent having to pay for pocket queries so that I have a means to filter out the junk.

 

I remember when there was less quantity and more quality.

 

I remember when geocaching was a lot more fun.

So, do you remember when they invented the wheel ... :)

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I remember when geocaching was more about going places and seeing things and less about finding stuff and how many.

 

I remember when I was impressed when somebody had 100 finds. Now I wonder how many guardrails and lightposts they probably kissed and why.

 

I remember when geocaching was more hiking in the woods and less riding around in the car.

 

I remember when there were no micros.

 

I remember when geocachers were more outdoorsy and less nerdy.

 

I remember when people hid caches one at a time.

 

I remember when caches were caches (i.e. supposed to be found) instead of "evil" hides.

 

I don't remember practicing "stealth" or playing the dodge the muggle game.

 

I remember enthusiastically signing up to be a charter member to support the website. Now I resent having to pay for pocket queries so that I have a means to filter out the junk.

 

I remember when there was less quantity and more quality.

 

I remember when geocaching was a lot more fun.

 

Amen.

 

Keep on Caching - Kewaneh

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I remember the thrill of finding my first cache. The fun, the comeraderie, the HUNT. Then things changed, it became political. More about the numbers than the find. Downhill from there. The thrill is gone I tell ya. Oh how I long for the old days.

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My first FTF (which was my second find - I didn't even OWN a GPS at the time!)

I still don't own a gps. B)B)B)

 

Being lazy, as I am, I have purchased a GPS, rather than have to figure how to refold all those maps!

B)B)

 

But that first FTF of mine, I'm in NE Ohio. My friend who got me hooked came to visit me from his home in Oregon. He saw a new cache hidden in my area that hadn't been found, before he left home, so he brought his GPS. After he'd travelled about 2500 miles, (and a few days passed) he (and I) were the FTF.

 

That's unheard of now!

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I remember when geocaching was more about going places and seeing things and less about finding stuff and how many.

 

I remember when I was impressed when somebody had 100 finds. Now I wonder how many guardrails and lightposts they probably kissed and why.

 

I remember when geocaching was more hiking in the woods and less riding around in the car.

 

I remember when there were no micros.

 

I remember when geocachers were more outdoorsy and less nerdy.

 

I remember when people hid caches one at a time.

 

I remember when caches were caches (i.e. supposed to be found) instead of "evil" hides.

 

I don't remember practicing "stealth" or playing the dodge the muggle game.

 

I remember enthusiastically signing up to be a charter member to support the website. Now I resent having to pay for pocket queries so that I have a means to filter out the junk.

 

I remember when there was less quantity and more quality.

 

I remember when geocaching was a lot more fun.

 

 

I remember all of the above except the part about geocaching being more fun. I'm having as much fun at it as ever.

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I remember when the cache descriptions told you something about the cache and the area, and contained a list of items the cache started out with. And folks logged what they took and left. Reading the logs was part of the fun, and the way we shared our adventures...sort of a virtual "sit around the campfire and talk about the day's hunt."

 

And I liked it better when we were sort of an underground activity and you were part of something that only a very few people even knew about, yet you conducted it right under the noses of the "uninitiated."

 

I still cache, when I feel like it, but I no longer check the site every day for new caches like I did when I first started. I can remember checking the site at work, and seeing a new one pop up that I could see the area from my office...so at lunch time I went for it....only to find that JoGPS had beaten my by 20 minutes...and he did the same for the next two....we were all so eager for the few new caches that popped up every couple of weeks.

 

I also remember meeting JoGPS on the trail coming back from a cache about a year later.. glad to finally meet him in person, as we had exchanged some friendly emails during the year about various caches in Nashville and I had kinda wondered what he was like.....heck of a nice guy, btw.

 

Caching has changed tremendously.... how much of that is for the better? I don't know.

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No offense to you "old timers" but I have read this thread several times and it seems to have a very depressing outlook on the "current" status of geocaching. I understand where everyone is coming from and how they hate to see change but look on the bright and positive side at how much things have changed for the better. I bet if there were 100 caches within 10 miles of your home/office way back in the day you would have been all over them like stink on ___.

 

Times change, things change and people change yet the site is going on strong and people are having fun every day.

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I remember when things were "different" but not better.

We used to have to drive 60+ miles for a cache since we'd found the scarce few in the general area.

I remember looking for Benchmarks just to get that "fix" I needed.

I remember manually inputing coords in the GPS (No wait, I still do that)

I remember caching with printouts (Nope, still do that too)

I even remember some folks east of us thinking they could beat us in a caching competition! :lol::P

I guess change is only bad if you let it change you.

 

What change I've seen was basicly for the better & it's just as much fun as it always was.

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I bet if there were 100 caches within 10 miles of your home/office way back in the day you would have been all over them like stink on ___.

 

Times change, things change and people change yet the site is going on strong and people are having fun every day.

 

I hope no one took my comment about 6 caches within a mile of my house as a complaint :mad: It was more a statement of amazement, than anything. I love that I can get 1000 caches without leaving my county if I want to do so :mad:

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I remember when the cache descriptions told you something about the cache and the area, and contained a list of items the cache started out with. And folks logged what they took and left. Reading the logs was part of the fun, and the way we shared our adventures...sort of a virtual "sit around the campfire and talk about the day's hunt."

 

And I liked it better when we were sort of an underground activity and you were part of something that only a very few people even knew about, yet you conducted it right under the noses of the "uninitiated."

 

I still cache, when I feel like it, but I no longer check the site every day for new caches like I did when I first started. I can remember checking the site at work, and seeing a new one pop up that I could see the area from my office...so at lunch time I went for it....only to find that JoGPS had beaten my by 20 minutes...and he did the same for the next two....we were all so eager for the few new caches that popped up every couple of weeks.

 

I also remember meeting JoGPS on the trail coming back from a cache about a year later.. glad to finally meet him in person, as we had exchanged some friendly emails during the year about various caches in Nashville and I had kinda wondered what he was like.....heck of a nice guy, btw.

 

Caching has changed tremendously.... how much of that is for the better? I don't know.

 

I guess in a way some of us are depressed. As many have stated above....caches used to take you to interesting places. Logs used to be fun to read, rather than the most popular of todays "TNLNSL"

 

The game has evolved and it's still fun. However like with everything else, some of us will always remember the good old days. 5 years from now the game will have evolved even more, and you will look back on the good old days.

 

El Diablo

Edited by El Diablo
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I remember looking at the site in 2001 and wishing I had a GPS, wishing there was a Geocache within 100 miles of me that I could borrow a GPS to go find, now I wish I had signed up the day I first found the site. I remember when I got my GPS in Christmas 2001 and having to wait four months than drive 750 miles to log my first find. I remember placing my first cache, the 22nd for Newfoundland and the 2nd for Labrador. I remember when geocaching was more about going places and seeing things and less about finding micros in a parking lot and how many you could find in a day. I remember when I was impressed when somebody had 100 finds. I remember when geocaching was more hiking in the woods and less riding around in the car. I remember when there were very few micros and none in/on guardrails. I remember when almost all geocachers were outdoorsy people. I remember less quantity and more quality but when I got a few finds I sort of liked quantity too. I remember when geocaching was just fun, now it is more than just fun, it has become a fun hobby and a passion.

Edited by gordonparsons
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I remember two names that kept coming up in the logs. There was this JoGPS dude that had some crazy number (100-ish?) of finds, but they were all over the midsouth so I couldn't really tell where he was from, but I was amazed. There was Murrcat that had found 27 of the ones in Middle TN and only in Middle TN, so I knew she was local-ish. On about my second day of caching - in 15 degree weather, and still wearing a neck collar from my spinal surgery the morning of 9/11 - actually bumping in to her in the woods at a cache site. Imaging the odds of meeting somone on the trail!

 

Back in the old days, we didn't have pocket queries. We had three ring binders of printed cache pages.

 

I remember those days well. I remember hanging out on the website waiting for a cache posting to come up so I could rush out and find it. I remember spending my entire Friday night planning for a Saturday of Geocaching, printing out cache pages and maps and adding them to that three ring binder. I remember hitting the dollar store once a week for geo swag items, in fact I always had my eye out for cool geo swag while shopping anywhere. I remember meeting robertlipe on the cache trail on that cold autumn day. I made a friend for life that day. And not long after that I met another geocacher, Jogps. Another life long friend was made. I miss the old days. I loved the hike in the woods to find a box full of goodies. I loved seeing some really neat places and landmarks that I may have never seen otherwise. I may not cache as much now, but I still love this sport. I'll always be a Geocacher. :mad:

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