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Scouting Program And Geocaching


ScoutingWV
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This thread is intended to be a discussion of those who are involved in the Boy Scouts and geocaching. It is not a place to air out any differences someone may have with any policies set by the national scouting program. I respect the opinions of others and feel they have every right to be heard, I am only asking that opinions that are off topic are voiced elsewhere and not in this particular thread.

 

I would like for this to be a discussion about ways in which geocaching can be incorporated into the scouting program in the U.S. and elsewhere.

 

- Share ideas for using geocaching to help both youth and adults learn skills related to navigation, map and compass, leave no trace, teamwork, and leadership.

- Share tips on using geocaching activities to help with rank advancement, merit badges, and outdoor activities that may not be so obvious to others.

- Share links to web sites that are within the forum guidelines and information on unit, council, district, regional or national programs that can be of interest.

 

I have seen other posts discussing the formation of a Venture Crew, geoscouting, scout related geocoins, training at Philmont and Sea Base, geocaching at the 2005 National Jamboree, and so on. I’d like to pool as much of that info as possible into one related thread.

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Thanks to mousewiz, this has become one of my favorite resources for scouting and geocaching - Marin Council in California.. Click on Resources and links, then Geoscouting. It shows what can happen when you combine a fun hobby like geocaching with some ingenuity.

 

Also, kaiserklan has some useful info here. Some folks have asked for a PowerPoint to introduce scouters to geocaching in other threads. I found one on this site.

 

Not only was geocaching an event at the 2005 Jamboree, but it will also be the subject of a training session at Philmont this summer. Here's the course info. I'll be there - anyone else reading this plan on attending?

 

Here's a discussion on a newly formed Venture Crew with geocaching as it's theme.

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Our Pack even used geocaching with the Bobcats. We wrote out the CubScout Promise and broke it into sections and stuck a section on each geocache. The boys could not open the geocache and get a prize until they learned that section of the promise. When they got to the next cache, they had to remember the first part of the promise and add the second part. We had 5 caches hidden and they had the promise learned in under 40 minutes.

 

The wonderful thing is that all the boys remembered it the next week! We have never had a group learn it this quick and geocaching had a very positive effect.

 

On thing that we are doing with our scout coin (that is coming out soon) is to give the Webelos a reason to learn the Scout Oath quickly. We are giving them two weeks to learn the Scout Oath. If they learn it, they

are getting a free scout geocoin. It is amazing how much the have learned in a few days! LOL

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I decided to break up my last post so it is not as hard to read.

 

We are doing Jamboree on the Trail this year with geocaching. We will be hiding 3-5 geocaches in our town for the scouts to find. We are opening this up to all scouts in our town. While the scouts are hunting the geocaches, they will also be on a trash hike. So trash in trash out.

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I've incorporated GPS and geocaching into troop activities in a number of ways.

 

The GPSr made it somewhat easy to set up the orienteering course that is part of the first class requirement. We usually do the orienteering in a park. I've gone in advance and decided where to place stages of the course and marked them in my GPS. I then transfer the waypoints to a topo map at mapcard.com. The boys have to find the waypoints using the map and compass and answer questions or perform activities (such as determine height/width of a feature) at each waypoint. The GPS also helps me ensure that the course covers the required mile.

 

It's a bit sad, but the boys (who are mostly younger scouts) aren't usually excited about going hiking. But, where possible, I've sought out trails near geocaches so that they are "hiking with a purpose." The idea of finding a geocache along the way has improved their attitude about hiking. This spring, I'll be incorporating geocaching into a 7+ mile map and compass hike. (There is a series of caches around a local lake.)

 

As a fun activity at a troop meeting, I set up a multi-stage cache around the grounds of our meeting place. There were two similarly placed sets of clues and the two patrols competed against each other to find the final cache. (I discussed how a GPSr works at a previous meeting.)

 

When we go hiking/canoeing/cycling, we record the track on a GPSr. The track is then placed on a topo map, and the boys can see where they went on a trip. It is also useful for checking the mileage of activities (ride length for the cycling merit badge, hike length for the camping meit badge, etc.)

 

Some other ways I've seen it incorporated into the scouting program include:

 

At the council summer camp last year, a series of geocaches was placed around the scout camp (different colored Dennison dots in pill bottles). Anyone who found 4 of the six caches was entered into a drawing for a GPSr unit. (Some of the hides were pretty tricky, the series covered a couple of miles, and good clues were given.)

 

We shared a campsite with a Venturing crew, and I got the impression that they can get some credit for learning/teaching the use of a GPSr. I was told that the crew found the skeleton of a wild horse on one of their trips. They recorded the location and were able to let rangers know the fate and location of one of the missing horses in the park.

 

A merit badge that incorporates GPS might be cool, but there is no substitute for learning basic map and compass skills! However, GPSr is a nice adjunct to orienteering skills.

Edited by tokencollector
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It's a bit sad, but the boys (who are mostly younger scouts) aren't usually excited about going hiking. But, where possible, I've sought out trails near geocaches so that they are "hiking with a purpose." The idea of finding a geocache along the way has improved their attitude about hiking. This spring, I'll be incorporating geocaching into a 7+ mile map and compass hike. (There is a series of caches around a local lake.)

 

When I got my son involved in the scouts, I thought we would be doing alot more hiking. That was kind of what I thought of when I thought of the boy scouts. I have had them out quite a few times which I probably wouldn't have done had it not been for geocaching. Took them out once to hide a cache for my daughters brownie troop. I agree that the boys wouldn't be too excited about simple hike, but "hiking with a purpose" will make them more excited. Planning to organize a CITO event for them this spring.

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I am also a boy scout, and there are many people in my troop that are intresated in geocaching. There probably won't be a merit badge for it, because it requires "specialized" equipment. At least, that is what my scoutmaster told me.

Many of the merit badges require special equipment to complete so I don't see that as a hinderance. I'm not sure what the process of getting geocaching approved as a merit badge entails, but I think it'd be cool.

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If you are interested in seeing it added as a merit badge, you would be well advised to send a letter to your council and to national asking that it be examined for inclusion. The process of adding a merit badge is cumbersome, but without some indication that there is a desire for it nothing will happen. One of the reasons I have heard for not including it is that it lacks important connection to outdoor skills, it is a game. I do not know if that is true or not. Also , some purist of the orienteering fraternity look down on inclusion.

 

It's a bit sad, but the boys (who are mostly younger scouts) aren't usually excited about going hiking

 

The Scout Program is supposed to be boy run, the boys of the troop are supposed to be designing their program, selecting their activities and choosing their activities within the parameters of the permitted activities, i.e No paintball, no mine exploration , etc. etc. , beyond that the leaders are supposed to mentor and advise. So if the boys do not wish to hike that is strictly their choice. Many boys love to camp but do not like to hike. Many like to bike but not to camp, but what they decide as a group should reflect varied activities in an outdoor setting.

Edited by Packanack
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We just started a Venturing Crew that is chartered by Michigan Geocaching Organization (MiGO). The obvious theme of the crew is geocaching. We are brand new but we are off to a good start. We have 12 youth members, 4 advisors and 4 committee members.

We attended our first event last month as a crew. At the end of the month we will be attending another where we will have our "official" charter presentation to MiGO.

Last weekend we hosted a geocaching station at our district klondyke derby. It was very well recieved and it was a great promotion for the crew and geocaching.

Plans are in the works for us to host a CITO event this spring, and several area scouting units have asked us to do a geocaching presentation at their meetings.

We are not limited to just geocaching, this is a youth run organization, whatever the crew does is the decision of the members as long as it is withing the scouting guidelines.

 

Crew profile: http://www.geocaching.com/profile/?guid=42...af-32018d993685

Edited by Geocrew 44°85°
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If you are interested in seeing it added as a merit badge, you would be well advised to send a letter to your council and to national asking that it be examined for inclusion. The process of adding a merit badge is cumbersome, but without some indication that there is a desire for it nothing will happen. One of the reasons I have heard for not including it is that it lacks important connection to outdoor skills, it is a game. I do not know if that is true or not. Also , some purist of the orienteering fraternity look down on inclusion.

 

All this has been discussed before about a year ago.. but the problem between Geocaching and Orienteering is that they can not be combined into a single badge without compromising both activities. A basic rule of Orienteering is that a map MUST be used and that electronic devices are ILLEGAL. Geocaching as a hobby will probably never get approval as a merit badge, however GPS usage, which can include geocaching as a practical application of the skills learned, probably can with a few years.. or decades.. of work. The most logical way to package the idea to present to BSA is to push for an "Electronic Navigation " badge. Note that just asking for it does next to nothing. Someone will need to step up and offer to write the requirements and the merit badge booklet for BSA to review. I've been through the process with the rewriting of the Orienteering Merit badge requirements and booklet. Some data is on my website http://www.scoutorienteering.com

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At the council summer camp last year, a series of geocaches was placed around the scout camp (different colored Dennison dots in pill bottles). Anyone who found 4 of the six caches was entered into a drawing for a GPSr unit. (Some of the hides were pretty tricky, the series covered a couple of miles, and good clues were given.)

 

Did they ever announce the winner at RK? I found all but the one near the OA Lodge.

 

That was a great addition to the camp activities for this old Scouter. I was there with our troop from flat Florida. The cache hunting almost made up for the long, steep climb to the chow hall! :D

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Sorry if this is off your topic a bit, but I just helped a troop (Girl Scouts) to get a badge for geocaching. They have asked me to expand this to a day event at summer camp this year. I was just looking for some more ways of presenting the information to them. Maybe even a few fun teamwork oriented hide ideas.

 

Thanks,

 

Nathan

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One other factor is how is the activity received within the Scouting community. There was great exposure at the Jamboree and that sometimes motivates people at National to look into other activities for merit badge promotions. One of the big concerns within scouting groups is that they need to be topical if they are to retain Scouts in the program. This might be one such way, I have never seen a scout who did not enjoy a geocache hunt.

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Did they ever announce the winner at RK? I found all but the one near the OA Lodge.

 

That was a great addition to the camp activities for this old Scouter. I was there with our troop from flat Florida. The cache hunting almost made up for the long, steep climb to the chow hall! :huh:

 

I thought the winner was announced in the council newspaper "The Raven," but I just went looking back through the online issues and coudn't find it. I wasn't the winner, but it was a fun diversion when I could find the time. (My son and I brought our receivers up with us and enjoyed the hunt in our spare time.) We're hoping that they do it again this year. If it's available, we'll let the boys decide if they want to do it as an organized group activity.

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All-

 

I was thinking.

 

Why should we be thinking that we need a Geocaching MB. Not all the badges that kids earn in Scouting are Merit Badges. Maybe we should be thinking more along the lines of the Snorkeling BSA, Kayaking BSA, Scuba BSA badges with a "Geocaching BSA" badge. May be easier to get something like that put together and approved.

 

Hopefully, the geocaching stuff at the recent Jamboree (and the incorporation of Geocaching into the new NYLT course) can help. There is also a geocaching training event at this summer's Philmont Training Center program:

 

Geocache and Scouting

Category: BOY SCOUTING

 

Course Description:

This course teaches Boy Scout Leaders how to use this new sport to enhance their troop in a number of ways. Participants will learn to use GPS technology and geocaching to add excitement to their troop operations while supporting traditional Scouting skills and Values. The course will culminate with the participant's own recruiting and retention plan to take back home, using geocaching to help exceed the membership goals of their units.

06/18/06 through 06/24/06

 

 

(btw, I am a scouter).

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I believe the best solution would be to modify the requirements for the orienteering badge to include orienteering with a GPSr. Orienteering best fits the topic of GPS navigation and such a modification would be very relevant in the "digital age". :ph34r:

 

PS - Soon to be Eagle Scout

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I am also a boy scout, and there are many people in my troop that are intresated in geocaching. There probably won't be a merit badge for it, because it requires "specialized" equipment. At least, that is what my scoutmaster told me.

Many of the merit badges require special equipment to complete so I don't see that as a hinderance. I'm not sure what the process of getting geocaching approved as a merit badge entails, but I think it'd be cool.

Just reading this thread and decided to "chime" in.... I too am a "old" Boy Scout and my son is presently in Cub Scouts... I met mousewiz at the recent University of Scouting in Dallas and was able to get valuable information from her concerning the consideration of a merit badge and how geocaching is being formed into scouting. She advised that the process has already been placed underway to consider such, since it doesn't really fall in line with Orienteering it's a given to earn its own merit badge placement. The more demand for this and the growing popularity will naturally formulate a merit badge. Mousewiz is and should be a main contact for all geocaching / scouting venues. This will insure the scouting community information is in her hands.
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I'm a staff member at GSCBC in NJ and a geocacher for a few years now. TODAY we are announcing our pilot program Geocaching 101~!

 

We have received several donations for GPS units and will be holding our first Geocaching Event on April 22, 2006.

 

I have been working on getting this program off the ground for a while now and am very pleased that it will finally be happening.

 

GSUSA has recently created a new IPP that is directly related to geocaching and our program will help Girl Scouts learn all about this fun, exciting past time! I LOVE the fact that it combines the best of both worlds... technology and the great outdoors.

 

I'll write and let you know how our newest of technology programs is received.

 

Nancy

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I am a scout leader and we use geocaching with our hikes to keep the kids interest up. Last weekend we put on a geocaching course at our district Klondik. We hide 9 cache's around the camping area in the woods and along the dry creek. The kids had a blast and really enjoyed the hunt. I think you could have two MB for this one as GPS use with maps and the other as Geocaching as a hobby, they have other hobby merit badges(stampcollecting).

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I am a Venturer Scout Leader in Australia.

 

I have just finished running a state event (not a huge attendance by US standards, but 25 kids attended), for the second year.

 

We call it "Frenzy". Basically we take teams of 3-6 Venturers (14-18yo) and hand them loaded GPS and map and they get six hours on foot to find as many specially hidden caches as they can manage.

 

The difficulty of the caches vary, as does the terrain. They are scored on with a rough formula of difficulty * distance from HQ (log scale) * 10 (or something like that).

 

As they find each cache, they sign the log and SMS (text message - don't know what you call them...) from their mobile back to HQ so we can calculate scores and know their locations.

 

Last year (2005) we ran from 4pm til 10pm around our state camp ground (one of many national jamboree sites - ours rotate) www.woodhouse.org.au the caches were on and off the site.

 

This year we ran in metropolitan adelaide - city based caches - mostly micros, again varying in distance and difficulty. This year they had 50 to choose from. They were provided maps and information and were encouraged to strategise to complete their goal.

 

The prize on offer was a GPS unit organised for purchase from a local supplier at cost. Prizes were funded from entrance fees.

 

Cached

South Australia

Edited by Cached
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Just at FYI.

 

GC.com has a feature called "Bookmarks", in which you can bookmark groups of caches. These you can make known to others. Many people are using these to bookmark caches with certain themes. I've created one called "Scouting Theme GC". ANY geocache with a scouting theme (near a scout camp, setup by a scouting group, training items are scouting-related, find/hide a scouting theme, etc) counts. Am sure i've missed a few, but if you know of any, and I haven't bookmarked it, let me know.

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I am a Boy Scout and I just discovered this amazing bit of news:

GEOCACHING IN GRFC

A new geocache has been placed at Gerber Scout Camp for all members of

the Boy Scouts ofAmerica to find and enjoy. This is a great opportunity to

teach your Scouts a amazing new skill with modern technology while on a

unique trip to Gerber Scout Camp. If have never heard about this and are

asking yourself, “A Geo..what now?”, then read on!! What happens is a

GPSr user hides a “treasure”, publishing the exact coordinates, for others to

find. There are only two rules to this game; If you take an item, leave

something too (but nothing illegal or harmful), and you must write about

your visit in the ‘log book’. For more information on Geocaching checkout

www.geocaching.com. To learn more about caching or to log a find in the

Gerald R Ford Council, e-mailMatt Hogg at mahogg@bsamail.org .

Current Geocache

Patch Trad-o-ree

COORDINATES HAVE BEEN REMOVED.

Placed by: Team Fire Scout (Look us up on Geocaching.com)

This cache has been certified: Mike Sulgrove and Scott Herrick

For those that are avid Geocachers this will not be listed on Geocaching.com

and we ask that it remain that way. Look for more caches to come in the

future.

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Well, it seems my home council has an elective course on geocaching at their upcoming University of Scouting Arts event.

 

The discription reads:

 

"Geocaching is an entertaining adventure game for GPS users. Participating in a cache hunt is a good way to take advantage of the wonderful features and capability of a GPS unit. During the hour participants will learn the basics of the sport as well as receive a quick introduction in the use of a GPS unit. Time permitting participants will use their knowledge to seek out a cache located on the camp property."

 

I may attend if I don't have a required class during that period. Am curious to see how good the class is, and if its being taugh by someone who has actually got some geocaching experience.

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Girl Scout Council of Bergen County is running a similar program beginning in April. My description of our "pilot event" is almost exactly the same as the one located below!

I hope to have several group trainings throughout the year and anyone who completes the basic training is eligible to borrow our GeoKits for use on their own.

 

 

 

Well, it seems my home council has an elective course on geocaching at their upcoming University of Scouting Arts event.

 

The discription reads:

 

"Geocaching is an entertaining adventure game for GPS users. Participating in a cache hunt is a good way to take advantage of the wonderful features and capability of a GPS unit. During the hour participants will learn the basics of the sport as well as receive a quick introduction in the use of a GPS unit. Time permitting participants will use their knowledge to seek out a cache located on the camp property."

 

I may attend if I don't have a required class during that period. Am curious to see how good the class is, and if its being taugh by someone who has actually got some geocaching experience.

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I work professionally for the Scouts in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. We're starting a geocaching program this summer at our summer camp. A group of Scout volunteers in the area (Team 481) are avid geocachers, and they are going to be helping out. Our council got a couple GPS systems, so we're going to place micros and ammo boxes all over the camp, and then we'll do a competition to see what troop can find the most during the week.

 

I will say getting a new merit badge created is a hard process. Here's information on the process:

 

http://usscouts.org/mb/proposals.html

 

I do know that the Surveying merit badge has a GPS requirement, but it's for the machine's use in surveying.

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Thanks to mousewiz, this has become one of my favorite resources for scouting and geocaching - Marin Council in California.. Click on Resources and links, then Geoscouting. It shows what can happen when you combine a fun hobby like geocaching with some ingenuity.

 

Also, kaiserklan has some useful info here. Some folks have asked for a PowerPoint to introduce scouters to geocaching in other threads. I found one on this site.

 

Not only was geocaching an event at the 2005 Jamboree, but it will also be the subject of a training session at Philmont this summer. Here's the course info. I'll be there - anyone else reading this plan on attending?

 

Here's a discussion on a newly formed Venture Crew with geocaching as it's theme.

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I have to chime in on this one.

 

Background: Me = Webelos Den Leader and Cubmaster :D ; also a geocacher (duh!) :D ; my older son = Webelos; my younger son = Scout wannabe (he's 5)

 

This year at Polar Camp, they had a separate program for the Webelos, and one of the activities was GPS usage. They had about 5 to 6 units so the scouts were broken into groups of 3 and 4. They had the waypoints pre programmed, and a course set up for the scouts. They were finding blue reflective markers with a number on them. My scouts really enjoyed it, so it was time to put my plan into action.

 

Next week Saturday, we are having a den picnic and family event. I am going to teach the scouts how to use a compass and have them run a mini compass course. (Earning use the map and compass Belt Loop and Pin) I am also going to give them a geocaching overview. We have a very nice park with 12 geocaches hidden in it. I've picked 5 for us to seek. We are also planning to drop two travel bugs as part of the event. (Scout related, of course).

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Hi! I'm an Eagle Scout, and I also am on staff for a Leadership Training course in my local council, called Silver Moccasin. At SM, they use GPS to help build the partols, and to show the boys that a map and compass isn't the only way to track where you are. They had the staff do the GPS exersize (which is what got me into Geocaching :)) and it was an amazing bonding experience for us. nobody could find the caches, but it was still fun. It also shows that you have to take leadership and go ahead to find the cache, even when you get discouraged. I can say that Geocaching has helped me as a scout. (even though I haven't found any yet, I'm still working on getting my parents out there, which isn't easy. (having them buy the GPS was eaiser than this, believe it or not *goes back on topic*) if you want the full exercise from the NYLT book, just let me know (through PM or e-mail) and I'll scan you a copy of it! :)

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I am very interested in seeing if we can get a Geocaching merit badge added to Scouts. Before charging off on my own, I wanted to see if anyone else has submitted it. From my research, it takes several years for a new badge to be approved, and it usually replaces an older one (they want to keep the number around 175-200).

 

If no one has done so, I plan to start the drive. Let me know if you would be interested in working together on it.

 

Thanks,

 

VISTAC4

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I am very interested in seeing if we can get a Geocaching merit badge added to Scouts. Before charging off on my own, I wanted to see if anyone else has submitted it. From my research, it takes several years for a new badge to be approved, and it usually replaces an older one (they want to keep the number around 175-200).

 

If no one has done so, I plan to start the drive. Let me know if you would be interested in working together on it.

 

Thanks,

 

VISTAC4

 

email sent

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There is a program being presented at Philmont over the summer --which will attempt to integrate geocaching into local scouting programs as a means of enhancing interest in the scouting program. A program activity as such. Geocaching is regarded as a possible means to attract boys to the scouting program.

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I have embraced geocaching in to my Scouting program. I have several Scout geocachers and several adult geocachers. We geocache at nearly every campout.

 

As was stated earlier, if you announce to a bunch of 11 year old kids that we'll be going on a 5 mile hike, you get groans galore. If, on the other hand, you ask who wants to go find a half dozen geocaches, they're ready to go. The end result is fantastic.

 

I have set up several geocaches in my Council's Camp. One is a 10 stage multi that is designed around that 5 mile hike. If you complete the first 8 stages, and have a backpack on, then you've completed the Camping MB requirment. I recently added geocaches that center around the plant and animal identification requirements for many ranks. By the way, the Buddy System is required to retrieve many of these caches.

 

I also completed the first "Cache to Eagle" series in my area. I've gotten great feedback. What a great way to show off Eagle Projects. Nominated for WGA Cache of the Month.

 

I'm holding a GeoScouting Event at the camp this March. We'll be having cachering Scouts teach Scouts and adult cachers teach adults how to cache, while I show Leaders how to use geocaching in their units' program.

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All this has been discussed before about a year ago.. but the problem between Geocaching and Orienteering is that they can not be combined into a single badge without compromising both activities. A basic rule of Orienteering is that a map MUST be used and that electronic devices are ILLEGAL. Geocaching as a hobby will probably never get approval as a merit badge, however GPS usage, which can include geocaching as a practical application of the skills learned, probably can with a few years.. or decades.. of work. The most logical way to package the idea to present to BSA is to push for an "Electronic Navigation " badge. Note that just asking for it does next to nothing. Someone will need to step up and offer to write the requirements and the merit badge booklet for BSA to review. I've been through the process with the rewriting of the Orienteering Merit badge requirements and booklet. Some data is on my website http://www.scoutorienteering.com

 

Regarding merit badges, Edscott says it well and I agree with him. I like the idea of the Electronic Merit Badge. But I think that Scouts should learn compass and map skills before learning to use a GPS. This is necessary for their safety in the field.

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There is a program being presented at Philmont over the summer --which will attempt to integrate geocaching into local scouting programs as a means of enhancing interest in the scouting program. A program activity as such. Geocaching is regarded as a possible means to attract boys to the scouting program.

 

Yes indeed! I had the privilege to attend the first course last summer and I'll be back again this year. I've gotta mention, it's not an attempt to integrate the activity - there are concrete ways to do so and it can attract youth to the program. It can also help re-energize youth and adults who may have stalled a bit in their units.

 

Any chance you'll be at the Philmont course, Packanack (or anyone else reading the thread)?

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Circle 10 - Gray Owl District in Garland, TX will be having a Cache-O-Ree in April. The event will be my baby.

 

I plan on modeling the event around the Texas Challenge Format. It will be a timed event with a punch card to be punched at each cache visited with an Orienteering Punch.

 

I plan on incorporating Scouting skills into the hides, but I'm interested in what others have done to do this.

 

snip<<<< By the way, the Buddy System is required to retrieve many of these caches. >>>>snip

 

Particularly interested in how you did this.

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You may wish to go to www.geocaching.com.au and head to the Queensland Caching forum, and look for a member named Cooroy Scouts. I dont know him/her/them personally, but they are fairly active in the Queensland scene, and Im sure they are scouts, given their username.

 

Mrs Bundy is a Group Leader with over 20 years scouting experience, and recently scored FTF on a GCA cache at the 21st Australian Jamboree in Victoria.

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This year at summer camp they are trying to get older scouts to come back to camp. So they are trying geocaching and other programs to entice older scouts. My troop has placed a couple caches. Also, we use geocaching to get the boys out and learn about the outdoors. Geocaching can be used for many MB's to get them out. Our last time out we biked a trail before the snow flew. Wedid some caching and worked on the forestry MB. Geocaching is a good tool to get scouts to attend functions because they get to do some trading. I had one scout say he will never miss a geocaching outing because he feels he is treasure hunting with a purpose.

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Just a note about something I saw in the current issue of Scouting Magazine. One of the featured articles is about the NAYLE program at Philmont. Geocaching is part of the program and they do have a small blurb about it in the article. Somewhere around page 35, if I recall.

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Ha! I remember camp Wisdom, I did OA there! I went there as a scout. I have been a scout leader in las vegas for 10 years in various postions. I hope a geocaching merit babge comes out of circle 10! I think a pre requisite of the orienteering badge should be required. Have fun!!! :laughing:

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