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San Diego County Cache Critters


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So come on now, what lead you to that trip? We want details, well, I do anyway.

The funny thing is, I'm not really sure any more. I'd been to southern India on business and after a lengthy trip to China and Tibet back in 2002, I decided that I'd like to do a similar trip to India. For a number of reasons, though we didn't get serious about it until 2006 and by then I'd blown all my vacation by changing jobs. Then we decided to go to England and somewhere along the way, we decided that we wanted to visit Bhutan as long as we were in the neighborhood which meant that it wasn't going to happen in 2007 so we decided to go in spring of 2008...

 

A cache critters bonus shot. Not a great photo but it harkens back to devhead's swarm o'bees.

 

Cache Critters of Bhutan and India (Bonus)

 

Bees -- Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

ec110960-077a-4c1e-8726-98301ee1a812.jpg

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So come on now, what lead you to that trip? We want details, well, I do anyway.

The funny thing is, I'm not really sure any more. I'd been to southern India on business and after a lengthy trip to China and Tibet back in 2002, I decided that I'd like to do a similar trip to India. For a number of reasons, though we didn't get serious about it until 2006 and by then I'd blown all my vacation by changing jobs. Then we decided to go to England and somewhere along the way, we decided that we wanted to visit Bhutan as long as we were in the neighborhood which meant that it wasn't going to happen in 2007 so we decided to go in spring of 2008...

 

A cache critters bonus shot. Not a great photo but it harkens back to devhead's swarm o'bees.

 

Cache Critters of Bhutan and India (Bonus)

 

Bees -- Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

ec110960-077a-4c1e-8726-98301ee1a812.jpg

Hey! I was in Santa Barbara last month.

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This morning, as I was walking back from Mirador Uno (a new cache up on Black Mountain), I was surprised by a gopher snake. It got me thinking that I really ought to pay more attention to who or what might be on the trail in front of me. Sure enough, I had not gone more than two or three hundred feet more then I caught the distinctive racing stripes of a red diamond rattlesnake. I had plenty of warning so I was able to work around it without disturbing it and I spent about fifteen minutes watching it as it moved slowly through the grass alongside of the trail.

 

d7168777-2132-4c4c-86ec-21cada555fd6.jpg

 

80a42f20-1047-4101-a7b2-122b409c604e.jpg

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This morning, as I was walking back from Mirador Uno (a new cache up on Black Mountain), I was surprised by a gopher snake. It got me thinking that I really ought to pay more attention to who or what might be on the trail in front of me. Sure enough, I had not gone more than two or three hundred feet more then I caught the distinctive racing stripes of a red diamond rattlesnake. I had plenty of warning so I was able to work around it without disturbing it and I spent about fifteen minutes watching it as it moved slowly through the grass alongside of the trail.

 

d7168777-2132-4c4c-86ec-21cada555fd6.jpg

 

80a42f20-1047-4101-a7b2-122b409c604e.jpg

Them's some of the best rattler photos yet! Rosie sure gets around on Black Mountain!

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Ok,

 

So, it's been a while since I've had anything to post here, but I saw a bird on the way home that I couldn't identify, so I'll see if anyone here can ID it for me.

 

I was heading home tonight at traffic was really backed up on the I-15. I was about 2 miles south of the Fallbrook exit, when I saw some movement through the air. I looked out the window, and there was a HUGE bird soaring around. The wingspan on it had to be at least 7 feet. I saw it land on the hillside along the path to a couple of Snake&Rooster caches. Since the traffic was going nowhere, I decided to get off at Mission Rd and backtrack to where I saw the bird.

 

When I crossed under the freeway, the bird was still on the hunt and soaring around. It didn't get close enough for me to get a good shot of it, but it was mostly black or really dark brown, with 3 or 4 rust colored splotches on it's back and wings. It soared over a hilltop, and landed, so I hopped out, and tried to get close enough for some pictures. It had landed on a large rock, and I got a couple of far-away shots, but when I tried to go up the hill to get a better shot, it took off. I manged to snap a couple of more shots, but my poor camera doesn't have a very good zoom, so it may be difficult to see.

 

It soared up pretty high, and then a couple of red-tails tried to chase it off their turf. Compared to the hawks, this thing was huge!

 

Sitting on a rock.

Bird-on-Rock.jpg

 

Cropped image

Bird-2.jpg

 

A different angle

Close-up-Bird.jpg

 

In flight.

Bird-in-flight.jpg

Edited by Cornerstone4
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Ok,

 

So, it's been a while since I've had anything to post here, but I saw a bird on the way home that I couldn't identify, so I'll see if anyone here can ID it for me.

 

I was heading home tonight at traffic was really backed up on the I-15. I was about 2 miles south of the Fallbrook exit, when I saw some movement through the air. I looked out the window, and there was a HUGE bird soaring around. The wingspan on it had to be at least 7 feet. I saw it land on the hillside along the path to a couple of Snake&Rooster caches. Since the traffic was going nowhere, I decided to get off at Mission Rd and backtrack to where I saw the bird.

 

When I crossed under the freeway, the bird was still on the hunt and soaring around. It didn't get close enough for me to get a good shot of it, but it was mostly black or really dark brown, with 3 or 4 rust colored splotches on it's back and wings. It soared over a hilltop, and landed, so I hopped out, and tried to get close enough for some pictures. It had landed on a large rock, and I got a couple of far-away shots, but when I tried to go up the hill to get a better shot, it took off. I manged to snap a couple of more shots, but my poor camera doesn't have a very good zoom, so it may be difficult to see.

 

It soared up pretty high, and then a couple of red-tails tried to chase it off their turf. Compared to the hawks, this thing was huge!

 

Sitting on a rock.

Bird-on-Rock.jpg

 

Cropped image

Bird-2.jpg

 

A different angle

Close-up-Bird.jpg

 

In flight.

Bird-in-flight.jpg

Almost definitely a Golden Eagle if seven-foot wing span, white flash in the wings, golden nape of neck, white tail with a broad dark terminal band, golden feet and lower legs.

 

Two of your images evidence many of the Golden Eagle field-guide characteristics ... eagle-beak confirmation, golden nape of neck, golden feet, white tail with dark band, and proper overall coloration.

 

To differentiate between in-flight Golden Eagles and in-flight Turkey Vultures know that Golden Eagles have a flat wing to the tip while Turkey Vultures have wing-tip dihedral. Thus a Turkey Vulture sort of rocks and tilts unsteadily in flight whereas a Golden Eagle is flat and stable in flight.

 

Ravens and hawks pester Golden Eagles but tend to ignore Turkey Vultures.

 

Good for you taking time for photographs. There's a Golden Eagle thats been hanging out along the San Diego River near North Magnolia Ave.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Almost definitely a Golden Eagle if seven-foot wing span, white flash in the wings, golden nape of neck, white tail with a broad dark terminal band, golden feet and lower legs.

 

Two of your images evidence many of the Golden Eagle field-guide characteristics ... eagle-beak confirmation, golden nape of neck, golden feet, white tail with dark band, and proper overall coloration.

 

To differentiate between in-flight Golden Eagles and in-flight Turkey Vultures know that Golden Eagles have a flat wing to the tip while Turkey Vultures have wing-tip dihedral. Thus a Turkey Vulture sort of rocks and tilts unsteadily in flight whereas a Golden Eagle is flat and stable in flight.

 

Ravens and hawks pester Golden Eagles but tend to ignore Turkey Vultures.

 

Good for you taking time for photographs. There's a Golden Eagle thats been hanging out along the San Diego River near North Magnolia Ave.

 

Harmon,

 

Definitely did not have the "finger" feathers at the ends of the wings. Also, it was flat and stable in flight.

 

Size wise, when the two hawks started trying to drive it away, as a size comparison, they looked like a blue jay would look compared to a crow. Quite a size difference!

 

I was thinking golden eagle, but I had never seen one. Thanks for the info!

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Here is another shot of the same bird.

 

Bird-flying.jpg

 

Harmon, I had to look up wingtip dihedral today... :sad:

 

I had assumed incorrectly last night what you were referring to...but now I think I have it straight!

 

Anyway, the thing that ruled out turkey vulture for me was the lack of the large white band across the trailing edge of it's wings and tail. When I first saw it...that was what I assumed it was, but then saw how dark the coloration was underneath.

 

The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!

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If the bird was wearing heels, it may have been Rooster checking on our Monserate caches.

 

If anyone is having trouble identifying birds, this Google book may be helpful, and it is free. Of course, you could also buy the book. It clearly details the same identifying characteristics that Harmon was talking about.

Woohoo! thanks for your support.

 

Rooster in heels?

 

04bcd1d6-505d-43f9-9241-33995ca32ce7.jpg

 

I've already got that photo.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Here is another shot of the same bird.

 

Bird-flying.jpg

 

Harmon, I had to look up wingtip dihedral today... :sad:

 

I had assumed incorrectly last night what you were referring to...but now I think I have it straight!

 

Anyway, the thing that ruled out turkey vulture for me was the lack of the large white band across the trailing edge of it's wings and tail. When I first saw it...that was what I assumed it was, but then saw how dark the coloration was underneath.

 

The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!

Hee-hee, I just knew that "dihedral" would cause a stir. For now I'm feeling like an eagle expert but waiting for Gecko Dad to lower the boom on me. Notice how I left an opening for Aquila chrysaetos ... and Southern Miss'.

 

I'm like you on the camera, toting an SLR is a bit much for mountainous hikes. My compromise is to use a small digital camera but tweak the shots with Photoshop CS3. Hard to make up for lack of zoom-lens though.

 

Only chance I've got to use an SLR on trail hikes is to trick Janie into carrying it for me. Any ideas on that problem?

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Here is another shot of the same bird.

 

Bird-flying.jpg

 

Harmon, I had to look up wingtip dihedral today... :sad:

 

I had assumed incorrectly last night what you were referring to...but now I think I have it straight!

 

Anyway, the thing that ruled out turkey vulture for me was the lack of the large white band across the trailing edge of it's wings and tail. When I first saw it...that was what I assumed it was, but then saw how dark the coloration was underneath.

 

The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!

Hee-hee, I just knew that "dihedral" would cause a stir. For now I'm feeling like an eagle expert but waiting for Gecko Dad to lower the boom on me. Notice how I left an opening for Aquila chrysaetos ... and Southern Miss'.

 

I'm like you on the camera, toting an SLR is a bit much for mountainous hikes. My compromise is to use a small digital camera but tweak the shots with Photoshop CS3. Hard to make up for lack of zoom-lens though.

 

Only chance I've got to use an SLR on trail hikes is to trick Janie into carrying it for me. Any ideas on that problem?

 

Try whining about how much your back hurts after you moved some furniture around. Sometimes, this works for me. :D

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Here is another shot of the same bird.

 

Bird-flying.jpg

 

Harmon, I had to look up wingtip dihedral today... :sad:

 

I had assumed incorrectly last night what you were referring to...but now I think I have it straight!

 

Anyway, the thing that ruled out turkey vulture for me was the lack of the large white band across the trailing edge of it's wings and tail. When I first saw it...that was what I assumed it was, but then saw how dark the coloration was underneath.

 

The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!

Hee-hee, I just knew that "dihedral" would cause a stir. For now I'm feeling like an eagle expert but waiting for Gecko Dad to lower the boom on me. Notice how I left an opening for Aquila chrysaetos ... and Southern Miss'.

 

I'm like you on the camera, toting an SLR is a bit much for mountainous hikes. My compromise is to use a small digital camera but tweak the shots with Photoshop CS3. Hard to make up for lack of zoom-lens though.

 

Only chance I've got to use an SLR on trail hikes is to trick Janie into carrying it for me. Any ideas on that problem?

 

Try whining about how much your back hurts after you moved some furniture around. Sometimes, this works for me. :D

Too late, I've already received an email from Janie offering well-considered remarks that make me wonder whether I should give some thought to a Plan B. Y' just never know when a woman might close her mind to a good idea. Besides, Steve would kick my tail if I claimed that I was moving Splash-furniture around.

 

It's always somethin',

Poor ol' Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
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The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!
I'm like you on the camera, toting an SLR is a bit much for mountainous hikes. My compromise is to use a small digital camera but tweak the shots with Photoshop CS3. Hard to make up for lack of zoom-lens though.

It's still a trade off but I have gone with a two camera solution...

 

I have my Canon 20D DSLR with a tele-zoom for those days when I willing to lug around the extra weight. This is the camera I used in India.

 

For those days when I want to run light, I have a Canon SD700IS. This little baby is ~3.5x2x1 inches and only 6 ounces. It has an film equivalent focal length of 35x140mm zoom that is image stablized (it has a 4x digital zoom on top of this but I don't usually use this...I can always "digitally zoom" on the computer when I get home.) It has a 6Mpixel CCD but the really important thing is that it has decent optics -- very hard to find in such a compact camera. The snake photos that I posted last Saturday were taken with this camera.

Edited by Let's Look Over Thayer
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The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!
I'm like you on the camera, toting an SLR is a bit much for mountainous hikes. My compromise is to use a small digital camera but tweak the shots with Photoshop CS3. Hard to make up for lack of zoom-lens though.

It's still a trade off but I have gone with a two camera solution...

 

I have my Canon 20D DSLR with a tele-zoom for those days when I willing to lug around the extra weight. This is the camera I used in India.

 

For those days when I want to run light, I have a Canon SD700IS. This little baby is ~3.5x2x1 inches and only 6 ounces. It has an film equivalent focal length of 35x140mm zoom that is image stablized (it has a 4x digital zoom on top of this but I don't usually use this...I can always "digitally zoom" on the computer when I get home.) It has a 6Mpixel CCD but the really important thing is that it has decent optics -- very hard to find in such a compact camera. The snake photos that I posted last Saturday were taken with this camera.

The thing is, like sports, cameras are handicapped by owner's age grouping. Without my handicap I have a mediocre digital camera but with my handicap the same camera is top-shelf in my age group. O by the way, its the camera I use in east San Diego county. :P

Edited by SD Rowdies
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Here is another shot of the same bird.

 

Bird-flying.jpg

 

Harmon, I had to look up wingtip dihedral today... :P

 

I had assumed incorrectly last night what you were referring to...but now I think I have it straight!

 

Anyway, the thing that ruled out turkey vulture for me was the lack of the large white band across the trailing edge of it's wings and tail. When I first saw it...that was what I assumed it was, but then saw how dark the coloration was underneath.

 

The wifey won't let me carry the digital slr around with me...but I may have to start carrying my old rebel with the 75-300 zoom on it. I will have to wait for film development....but there are always tradeoffs!

 

No expert but definitely think it is a gold eagle. They are actually almost common in some spots around LA. Some of the islands around there are actually having problems with them killing too many foxes. The other option would be a thunder bird and if you think that bird is that maybe you should report it here.

Edited by warmouse4000
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I have enjoyed viewing the eagle photos and the associated discussion thread. The photos and descriptions match nicely to the features of a Golden Eagle. Bonus points to Harmon for contributing the Latin species name.

 

For comparison with Turkey Vultures, there are postings of TVs in flight on this forum (see below for a sample).

 

Turkey Vultures always have a "naked" head, red for adults and black for juveniles. The eagle photos clearly show a feathered head of the correct color for a Golden Eagle.

 

I highly recommend "The Sibley Guide to Birds" as the gold(en) standard for bird species identification.

-GD

 

Post 184

 

Post 270

 

Post 278

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Interesting how so many of us share a fascination with raptors. Coincidentally, there was a special on KPBS last night about the flight characteristics of various raptors, including Golden Eagles. They even attached a miniature camera to the back of several birds so that you could get to see from the birds point of view. Amazing watching a Peregrine Falcon in a 200 mph stoop, from one of these cameras! I'd recommend it (check local listings, yada, yada, yada)

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I have my Canon 20D DSLR with a tele-zoom for those days when I willing to lug around the extra weight. This is the camera I used in India.

 

That explains why those pics were so impressive! We've got a Digital Rebel...can't remember the exact model though...10D or some such. The bummer is my old telephoto/zoom will fit...but only in manual mode. I'm waiting to get a nice telephoto for the Rebel.

 

For those days when I want to run light, I have a Canon SD700IS. This little baby is ~3.5x2x1 inches and only 6 ounces. It has an film equivalent focal length of 35x140mm zoom that is image stablized (it has a 4x digital zoom on top of this but I don't usually use this...I can always "digitally zoom" on the computer when I get home.) It has a 6Mpixel CCD but the really important thing is that it has decent optics -- very hard to find in such a compact camera. The snake photos that I posted last Saturday were taken with this camera.

 

I carry an SD630 with me...and that is what I used on the Eagle shots.

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I have enjoyed viewing the eagle photos and the associated discussion thread. The photos and descriptions match nicely to the features of a Golden Eagle. Bonus points to Harmon for contributing the Latin species name.

 

For comparison with Turkey Vultures, there are postings of TVs in flight on this forum (see below for a sample).

 

Turkey Vultures always have a "naked" head, red for adults and black for juveniles. The eagle photos clearly show a feathered head of the correct color for a Golden Eagle.

 

I highly recommend "The Sibley Guide to Birds" as the gold(en) standard for bird species identification.

-GD

 

Post 184

 

Post 270

 

Post 278

Hey everybody, I got a pat on the back from Gecko Dad!

When you get to hang-out with Splashette and then receive

approval from Gecko Dad then life is definitely good.

 

... did I mention being married to an ex-nun?

 

Don, your Post 184 shows Turkey Vulture wing dihedral

really well.

 

What was that childhood story about vultures plucking the

eyeballs out of a dead animal ... maybe "Red Pony?"

 

Lucky ol' Harmon

Edited by SD Rowdies
Link to comment

I have enjoyed viewing the eagle photos and the associated discussion thread. The photos and descriptions match nicely to the features of a Golden Eagle. Bonus points to Harmon for contributing the Latin species name.

 

For comparison with Turkey Vultures, there are postings of TVs in flight on this forum (see below for a sample).

 

Turkey Vultures always have a "naked" head, red for adults and black for juveniles. The eagle photos clearly show a feathered head of the correct color for a Golden Eagle.

 

I highly recommend "The Sibley Guide to Birds" as the gold(en) standard for bird species identification.

-GD

 

Post 184

 

Post 270

 

Post 278

Hey everybody, I got a pat on the back from Gecko Dad!

When you get to hang-out with Splashette and then receive

approval from Gecko Dad then life is definitely good.

 

... did I mention being married to an ex-nun?

 

Don, your Post 184 shows Turkey Vulture wing dihedral

really well.

 

What was that childhood story about vultures plucking the

eyeballs out of a dead animal ... maybe "Red Pony?"

 

Lucky ol' Harmon

This Turkey-Vulture link from FisnJack.

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It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

Edited by spooky
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It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

 

 

It is a bit hard to make him/her out. In the future, you should try to get closer. I find that between 2 and 3 feet is the perfect distance. You want to focus on his eyes! Be sure to hold the camera very still, (i.e., try not to shake) or the picture may blur. :)

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It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

 

 

It is a bit hard to make him/her out. In the future, you should try to get closer. I find that between 2 and 3 feet is the perfect distance. You want to focus on his eyes! Be sure to hold the camera very still, (i.e., try not to shake) or the picture may blur. :rolleyes:

 

 

Good advice 00020148.gif

Edited by SKILLET
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It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

 

 

It is a bit hard to make him/her out. In the future, you should try to get closer. I find that between 2 and 3 feet is the perfect distance. You want to focus on his eyes! Be sure to hold the camera very still, (i.e., try not to shake) or the picture may blur. :P

 

 

Good advice 00020148.gif

Anything is possible with Photoshop.

 

e5938973-16cb-4b4f-bc57-b683f9749c04.jpg

 

Or even Adobe Bridge Loupe.

Edited by SD Rowdies
Link to comment
It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

 

 

It is a bit hard to make him/her out. In the future, you should try to get closer. I find that between 2 and 3 feet is the perfect distance. You want to focus on his eyes! Be sure to hold the camera very still, (i.e., try not to shake) or the picture may blur. :D

 

 

Good advice 00020148.gif

Anything is possible with Photoshop.

 

e5938973-16cb-4b4f-bc57-b683f9749c04.jpg

 

Or even Adobe Bridge Loupe.

 

Wow! And you got him to coil up too. In the original picture, he was stretched out. Amazing! :P

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It's probably a little hard to see, but there is a 4 foot rattlesnake in the center of this photo. I was doing a couple of catches in Twin Peaks park in Poway on May 9, 2003. This snake was pretty near the top of one peak. Lots of rattling. I never got that cache...

 

pow012.jpg

 

 

It is a bit hard to make him/her out. In the future, you should try to get closer. I find that between 2 and 3 feet is the perfect distance. You want to focus on his eyes! Be sure to hold the camera very still, (i.e., try not to shake) or the picture may blur. :P

 

 

Good advice 00020148.gif

Anything is possible with Photoshop.

 

e5938973-16cb-4b4f-bc57-b683f9749c04.jpg

 

Or even Adobe Bridge Loupe.

 

Wow! And you got him to coil up too. In the original picture, he was stretched out. Amazing! :D

Good gosh, you mean you could actually see the snake in that photo? To

be honest I have no idea if the loupe is pointed at the actual snake.

 

A little known fact about rattlers is that they hate the sound of a camera

and so always coil up just before the image is captured. Trust me on this.

 

Yeah, yeah ... I know about the posted Flagman-shot of a straight snake.

Tom straightened the snake out with Photoshop.

 

We need to send some of our local Geocachers to snake-photo school. As

you pointed out one must walk up to the snake for a well-composed full-

frame shot. Always keep in mind that beeth and snaketh are our friendth.

Trutht me on thith.

Edited by SD Rowdies
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While caching at Otay Lake yesterday, I thaw a thnake. ;)

 

e3b15d9b-bf55-49d7-a5f7-6851d9b48dea.jpg

 

As usual, it was not happy with us once it became aware of our presence.

 

672b48e4-83b1-4a9e-ada7-9c094679ed47.jpg

 

So . . . be careful out there everyone.

Thufferin' thuccotathh, another thtraight thnake. Mutht be a new thpecieth.

 

I do wish you all would quit making fun of snakes! :lol:

 

Nice shots, Mirage. Remember though . . . focus on the eyes and get really really close for those really great shots!

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While caching at Otay Lake yesterday, I thaw a thnake. :lol:

 

e3b15d9b-bf55-49d7-a5f7-6851d9b48dea.jpg

 

As usual, it was not happy with us once it became aware of our presence.

 

672b48e4-83b1-4a9e-ada7-9c094679ed47.jpg

 

So . . . be careful out there everyone.

Thufferin' thuccotathh, another thtraight thnake. Mutht be a new thpecieth.

 

Sigh, forum burp.

Edited by Snake & Rooster
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It must be Insect Encounter day...so here is Insect Encounter #1. An Eleode beetle (a.k.a Stinkbug) was attacking a caterpiller. It seemed unable to subdue the caterpiller but caterpiller seemed unable to elude the stinkbug even though it escaped several times. We continued our hike before the matter was settled. We were in Oak Canyon, on our way to "Deliverance" (GC19337)

 

d8d61af6-b9c8-4b36-878e-0ecdbf17de3f.jpg

 

3d172781-a752-47eb-b7a2-73e6cede3671.jpg

 

14d65a04-1437-4124-8406-e97990c9ace2.jpg

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And now for Insect Encounter #2. I was on the west side of Fortuna Saddle heading toward It's A Numbers Game (GCGC18821) and heard a buzzing sound. At first I thought it was beeth, but I noticed that the ground was covered with these casts. Obviously something had just reached the adult stage, but what? Further investigation resulted in observing that there were two types of insect. I suspect one was preying on the other but which was which. I never did resolve that question. If there are any entomologists in the audience, I seek enlightenment about what was going on here.

 

Bown soil and casts.

6917c6d0-29f1-47d8-9a7f-50209b258bb0.jpg

 

Closeup view of the casts. If you look carefully, you can see insects in the picture too.

e980b642-26fd-4302-8458-5509b8a01d22.jpg

 

Closeup shot of the two insects. One appears to be a wasp of some sort and the other a fly or beetle or something...

17805de3-b58b-41e5-99a8-cd3c4c5b732f.jpg

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And now for Insect Encounter #2. I was on the west side of Fortuna Saddle heading toward It's A Numbers Game (GCGC18821) and heard a buzzing sound. At first I thought it was beeth, but I noticed that the ground was covered with these casts. Obviously something had just reached the adult stage, but what? Further investigation resulted in observing that there were two types of insect. I suspect one was preying on the other but which was which. I never did resolve that question. If there are any entomologists in the audience, I seek enlightenment about what was going on here.

 

Bown soil and casts.

6917c6d0-29f1-47d8-9a7f-50209b258bb0.jpg

 

Closeup view of the casts. If you look carefully, you can see insects in the picture too.

e980b642-26fd-4302-8458-5509b8a01d22.jpg

 

Closeup shot of the two insects. One appears to be a wasp of some sort and the other a fly or beetle or something...

17805de3-b58b-41e5-99a8-cd3c4c5b732f.jpg

Good gravy! run for your life ... y'all gonna die!

 

It'th th' thecond coming of beeth and wathpth ath predicted in Thtar Trek th' Thecond Generathion.

 

I'll check it out for you, what did you say the coordinates to that puzzle cache are?

 

Sand Digger Wasp

 

Edited by SD Rowdies
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