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A Refresher Test For Everyone


sept1c_tank
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How long has it been since you have hidden a cache? How do you score on your knowledge of the cache guidelines, the tutorial and the terms of use of this website?

 

Take this easy True or False test:

 

 

1. There are plenty of precedents for placing caches. The past listing of a similar cache is usually a valid justification for the listing of a new cache.

 

2. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache.

 

3. As the cache owner, you are also responsible for physically checking your cache periodically, and especially when someone reports a problem with the cache (missing, damaged, wet, etc.). If you encounter a problem such as this, you must archive your cache to let others know it is no longer available.

 

4. The reviewers use a rule of thumb that caches placed within 161 meters of another cache may not be listed on the site.

 

5. Placing caches on vacation or outside of your normal caching area is a fascinating way to meet new cachers and these caches are encouraged.

 

6. The best caches are always the ones that are very close to the parking lot or trail.

 

7. When leaving items in a cache, use your common sense in most cases. Food items are always appreciated.

 

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13. Ultimately you'll want to place a cache in a place that is unique in some way. The big reward for geocachers, other than finding the cache itself, is the location. A prime camping spot, great viewpoint, unusual location, etc. are all good places to hide a cache.

 

14. The most important thing to consider when choosing a cache container is your expense and the potential loss of or damage to the container.

 

15. Anyplace is a good place for a cache.

 

Answers:

1. F

2. T

3. F

4. T

5. F

6. F

7. F

8. F

9. F

10. T

11. F

12. T

13. T

14. F

15. F

Edited by sept1c_tank
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<Snarky but to-the-point comments about the test removed.>

 

1. They are rules, not guidelines.

 

2.  And, contrary to the assumption in this test, they weren't handed down by God.

 

You get an F.

Nice to see you back to your old self Fizzy, but for #1 just because you say so doesn't make it true. if they were rules then the two I listed last week that are closer than 528 ft I am going to have to archive. The one I listed that was closer that 150 feet to an RR track will have to go. The Virtual I recently listed where you could have placed a micro will have to be shut down. There are many more that I can list here that do not adhere to a strict rule but do work inside a guideline.

 

As for #2 if they were handed down by God then they would be commandments not rules. I have posted in the Reviewers forum before that they are "guidelines not the 10 commandments."

 

So on your 2 points the best you get is a F. With one right and one wrong thats 50%. In Colorado you need above 60% to get a D-.

 

But' it is nice to see the fizzy we all know and love back in the forums :rolleyes: O and BTW, its a game not a science.

 

 

BTW for those with small screens the answers to the snarky and silly test are printed here in larger type

Answers:

1. F

2. T

3. F

4. T

5. F

6. F

7. F

8. F

9. F

10. T

11. F

12. T

13. T

14. F

15. F

Edited by CO Admin
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Nice to see you back to your old self Fizzy, but for #1 just because you say so doesn't make it true. if they were rules then the two I listed last week that are closer than 528 ft I am going to have to archive. The one I listed that was closer that 150 feet to an RR track will have to go. The Virtual I recently listed where you could have placed a micro will have to be shut down.

 

I thought virtuals weren't allowed anymore? I was told I couldn't even adopt an already existing deactivated virt in Maryland, and in Colorado they're approving new ones?

Edited by ParrotRob
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I thought virtuals weren't allowed anymore? I was told I couldn't even adopt an already existing deactivated virt in Maryland, and in Colorado they're approving new ones?

 

You thought wrong. The guidelines (or rules) were tightened to the point it was difficult, but not impossible to get one approved. There have been dozens of virtuals approved over the past couple of years.

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I thought virtuals weren't allowed anymore? I was told I couldn't even adopt an already existing deactivated virt in Maryland, and in Colorado they're approving new ones?

 

You thought wrong.

My bad. I somehow mistook an email from an approver saying I might wish to

 

list this on Waymarking.com

 

because

 

we no longer approve virtual caches

 

to mean "we no longer approve virtual caches", not "it's hard to list virtual caches".

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I thought virtuals weren't allowed anymore? I was told I couldn't even adopt an already existing deactivated virt in Maryland, and in Colorado they're approving new ones?

You are talking about two different things.

 

1. I think you mean "archived" instead of "deactivated". An archived virtual must be resubmitted and must conform to the current guidelines. That is the same for any cache pretty much, except in some extreme circumstances and is addressed on a case by case basis.

 

2. New ones that fit within the guidelines are still being listed on this site. I just listed one in DC by DaisyChain. If fit within the guidelines.

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I thought virtuals weren't allowed anymore?  I was told I couldn't even adopt an already existing deactivated virt in Maryland, and in Colorado they're approving new ones?

You are talking about two different things.

 

1. I think you mean "archived" instead of "deactivated". An archived virtual must be resubmitted and must conform to the current guidelines. That is the same for any cache pretty much, except in some extreme circumstances and is addressed on a case by case basis.

 

2. New ones that fit within the guidelines are still being listed on this site. I just listed one in DC by DaisyChain. If fit within the guidelines.

Yes, you're right, archived. Doesn't change the fact that I was told that virtuals are no longer listed because of Waymarking. In fact, I was told a similar thing by two separate approvers. One explicitly and one generally.

 

Regardless, the real issue appears to be inconsistency in the way the rules/guidelines are applied. The question shouldn't be one of "is this explicitly allowed?", but instead "what would <listing this event>/<relisting this virt>/<whatever> HURT?"

 

edit: it's separate, not seperate, Rob, you idiot

Edited by ParrotRob
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...Answers:

1. F

2. T

3. F

4. T

5. F

6. F

7. F

8. F

9. F

10. T

11. F

12. T

13. T

14. F

15. F

Congratulations, CO Admin. you got them all right! ;)

 

How'd I do?

 

For a guy who carries his cat in a 12-pack container, very well.

 

As for the test -- I found it condescending yet trite. I really can't believe somebody would actually post something like this and think they were doing something helpful.

 

I'm sorry you feel that way; trite, maybe, but exactly what about my test is condescending? And although the test may not be directly helpful, in what way is it unhelpful?

 

Does this mean you're over helping me with that puzzle cache? :P;)

Edited by sept1c_tank
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<Snarky but to-the-point comments about the test removed.>

 

So on your 2 points the best you get is a F. With one right and one wrong thats 50%. In Colorado you need above 60% to get a D-.

 

But' it is nice to see the fizzy we all know and love back in the forums ;) O and BTW, its a game not a science.

 

 

Hummmm here it takes a 70% to pass.... is that saying something?? ;)

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1. There are plenty of precedents for placing caches. The past listing of a similar cache is usually a valid justification for the listing of a new cache.

T: While a past cache is not valid in GEO-COURT for jusifying your new cache if there is a guideline issue, looking around you should give you a good idea of what you can do when you place your cache.

2. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache.

F: If it's a container it's a traditional cache. The log book is usually (but not always) part of the contents.

3. As the cache owner, you are also responsible for physically checking your cache periodically, and especially when someone reports a problem with the cache (missing, damaged, wet, etc.). If you encounter a problem such as this, you must archive your cache to let others know it is no longer available.

T: You own it you are responsible.

4. The reviewers use a rule of thumb that caches placed within 161 meters of another cache may not be listed on the site.

T: 528', 176 yards, 8 Chains or whatever your favorit unit of measure.

5. Placing caches on vacation or outside of your normal caching area is a fascinating way to meet new cachers and these caches are encouraged.

F: Discouraged, yes. Impossible, No. If you do meet a local and show him something about their backyard, by all means place the cache and work out a deal with the local as co-owner. That still may not get it approved but your bases are covered.

6. The best caches are always the ones that are very close to the parking lot or trail.

O: Depends on who's preaching. That's typically where parks with trails want them. Me I want them at the intersting spot 200' beyond the trails end. The one they forgot to tell you about.

7. When leaving items in a cache, use your common sense in most cases. Food items are always appreciated.

T & F: Common sence in most cases is fine. Food is bad.

 

8-12: Are not geocaching. Just Legal junk for this site.

13. Ultimately you'll want to place a cache in a place that is unique in some way. The big reward for geocachers, other than finding the cache itself, is the location. A prime camping spot, great viewpoint, unusual location, etc. are all good places to hide a cache.

This is a trick question. There are scenic hides, eductional hides, clever hides, puzzle hides and room enough in this game for all of them. A clever hide can be more than a hollow stump in the woods. It can be a fake parking meter in someones driveway.

14. The most important thing to consider when choosing a cache container is your expense and the potential loss of or damage to the container.

T: Having it blown up because you chose the wrong one for the job sucks and is a waste of money.

15. Anyplace is a good place for a cache.

Anyplace that is a place of public accomodation is a good place for a cache of one type or another be it traditional, virtual, locationless, or a benchmark. Some places of not so public accomodation may be good spots a well.

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1. There are plenty of precedents for placing caches. The past listing of a similar cache is usually a valid justification for the listing of a new cache.

 

T: While a past cache is not valid in GEO-COURT for jusifying your new cache if there is a guideline issue, looking around you should give you a good idea of what you can do when you place your cache.

 

The correct answer is F, although your explanation is correct:

First and foremost please be advised there is no precedent for placing caches. This means that the past listing of a similar cache in and of itself is not a valid justification for the listing of a new cache.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2. A container with just an object or codeword for verification, and no logbook, generally, does not qualify as a traditional cache.

 

F: If it's a container it's a traditional cache. The log book is usually (but not always) part of the contents.

 

The correct answer is T:

 

This is the original cache type consisting of (at a bare minimum) a container and a logbook.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

3. As the cache owner, you are also responsible for physically checking your cache periodically, and especially when someone reports a problem with the cache (missing, damaged, wet, etc.). If you encounter a problem such as this, you must archive your cache to let others know it is no longer available.

 

T: You own it you are responsible.

 

The correct answer is F:

 

As the cache owner, you are also responsible for physically checking your cache periodically, and especially when someone reports a problem with the cache (missing, damaged, wet, etc.). You may temporarily disable your cache to let others know not to hunt for it until you have a chance to fix the problem.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

4. The reviewers use a rule of thumb that caches placed within 161 meters of another cache may not be listed on the site.

 

T: 528', 176 yards, 8 Chains or whatever your favorit unit of measure.

Correct.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

5. Placing caches on vacation or outside of your normal caching area is a fascinating way to meet new cachers and these caches are encouraged.

 

F: Discouraged, yes. Impossible, No. If you do meet a local and show him something about their backyard, by all means place the cache and work out a deal with the local as co-owner. That still may not get it approved but your bases are covered.

 

Correct.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

6. The best caches are always the ones that are very close to the parking lot or trail.

O: Depends on who's preaching. That's typically where parks with trails want them. Me I want them at the intersting spot 200' beyond the trails end. The one they forgot to tell you about.

 

The correct answer is F

 

If it is only a couple hundred feet from the highway, there's a strong chance someone may plunder it. Try to find a place that will take a bit of time to get to, preferably on foot…If it is too visible, or too close to busy roads, trails, etc. there's a good chance someone may stumble upon it.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

7. When leaving items in a cache, use your common sense in most cases. Food items are always appreciated.

 

T & F: Common sence in most cases is fine. Food is bad.

 

The correct answer is F (as you already know).

 

Do not put food in a cache!

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

8-12: Are not geocaching. Just Legal junk for this site.

 

OK, minus four. But you have read the terms of use today, right?

 

Groundspeak reserves the right to revise the terms of this Agreement at any time and from time to time. Each time You use the Site, You are bound by the version of this Agreement that is in effect and posted on the Site at the time of Your use. Please review them.

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

13. Ultimately you'll want to place a cache in a place that is unique in some way. The big reward for geocachers, other than finding the cache itself, is the location. A prime camping spot, great viewpoint, unusual location, etc. are all good places to hide a cache.

 

This is a trick question. There are scenic hides, eductional hides, clever hides, puzzle hides and room enough in this game for all of them. A clever hide can be more than a hollow stump in the woods. It can be a fake parking meter in someones driveway.

 

The correct answer is T, but I agree with you. The question is a direct quote from the tutorial, which is less than perfect.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

14. The most important thing to consider when choosing a cache container is your expense and the potential loss of or damage to the container.

 

T: Having it blown up because you chose the wrong one for the job sucks and is a waste of money.

 

The correct answer is F. But since this question cannot be definitively answered by reading the guidelines, terms or tutorial, T or F is acceptable. It is interesting that the tutorial suggests using a pipe. Perhaps a more suitable T or F question would have been, “Whatever the container, make sure to mark your cache so that someone who doesn't play can figure out what it is.”

 

QUOTE (From the Tutorial

)

First, you need a container. Anything water resistant, snow resistant, etc (depending on your climate), will do, but geocachers have had good success with plastic buckets, tupperware (or rubbermaid) containers, ammo boxes, or unused sewer pipes (really!).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

15. Anyplace is a good place for a cache.

 

Anyplace that is a place of public accomodation is a good place for a cache of one type or another be it traditional, virtual, locationless, or a benchmark. Some places of not so public accomodation may be good spots a well.

 

The correct answer is F. Good luck on getting that virtual (or any other type of cache)

at the end of the runway, approved. Ideally, any place might be a good place for some type of cache, but this is not an ideal world, IMO.

 

Caches may be quickly archived if we see the following (which is not inclusive):

· Caches on land maintained by the U.S. National Park Service or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (National Wildlife Refuges)

· Caches that are buried. If a shovel, trowel or other “pointy” object is used to dig, whether in order to hide or to find the cache, then it is not appropriate.

· Caches that deface public or private property, whether a natural or man-made object, in order to provide a clue or a logging method.

· Caches placed on archaeological or historical sites. In most cases these areas are highly sensitive to the extra traffic that would be caused by vehicles and humans.

· Caches hidden in close proximity to active railroad tracks. In general we use a distance of 150 ft but your local area’s trespassing laws may be different. All local laws apply.

· Caches near or on military installations.

· Caches near or under public structures deemed potential or possible targets for terrorist attacks. These include but are not limited to highway bridges, dams, government buildings, elementary and secondary schools, and airports.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Unless I have incorrectly graded your test, you have answered four questions correctly. Since this is a voluntary test, for fun and discussion only, and since you graciously and thoughtfully submitted some viable issues, you get an A! (much better than my F!) ;):P;)

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sept1c_tank, 4? That's flunking by any standard. However we disagree on certain thing's that don't matter all that much. A traditional cache for example can be just the log, but typically it's the container even if it has no log (if the log is stolen does it stop being a traditional cache? Of course not). I've still got logless traditional cache.

 

A virtual on a runway...That's not a place of public accomodation however I can think of ways to do a viable cache...er waymark these days, on one.

 

As for the park and trail I did qualify that to say it depends on who's preaching. Parks often make rules that say your cache has to be on or accessable from the trail. Also there is no hard rule that says the cache 200' off trail is better than the one on the trail. I've got one stuck about 100' from one cache and 300' from another (not on GC.com) that's better than both because my spot 15' from the trail off the trail is better than their spots 20 and 100' off the trail. Also the key you used is random muggling. That's an art to know that the rock knoll 200 yards off trail is a kid magnet and that you want your cache to last. The entire point in the tutorial was to keep muggles in mind.

 

And so on.

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Holly Heck Batman! Is there an echo in here? I thought duplicate posts were frowned upon. Sorry sept1c, and I've been tracking the thread since my original posts, but I still don't see the point in being so exclusionary in our mutual enjoyment of an activity that gets us all outdoors and makes us appreciate the few rights as an American we all get. What happens to a cacher once they pass the "I have now found XXXX caches" milestone??? Do the PTB visit your house in the middle of the night, kidnap you, transport you to somewhere you've never been and conduct some sort of ritual right of passage??? Please let's give this GAME it's chance to be what it was intended to be, in my opinion, and that's an environment for me to place coords on the site, that bring people to someplace that's special to me, that you might not visit otherwise...AND...you might just find a box of trinkets and a log book at the end of your search! Sounds OK to me, but I'm sure there are those out there that have found so many and reached such an exulted status that no silly mortal should be allowed to join the ranks without first returning with the Ark of the Covenant as proof of worthiness!!!

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Here we go again. :lol: This is getting boring.

Ya think? This topic would be better posted in the getting started fourm, if any place. Suggesting that we all might need a refresher course is kind of insulting. Granted there are those that never knew how to hide one, but they never will, test or no test.

 

The majority of people that post in these fourms are hardcore cachers and can read and interrupt the guidelines as well as septic tank.

 

El Diablo

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...Suggesting that we all might need a refresher course is kind of insulting. ...The majority of people that post in these fourms are hardcore cachers and can read and interrupt the guidelines as well as septic tank.

 

El Diablo

Although I feel no remorse for insulting you, I feel really bad about interrupting the guidelines. :lol::P

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OMG! I may be banned. It’s clear that I have violated the terms of use on this website.

...I feel really bad about interrupting the guidelines. 

 

You and not Groundspeak, are entirely responsible for all content that you upload, post or otherwise transmit via the Site. You agree not to:

(f) Upload, post or otherwise transmit any content that contains viruses or any other computer code, files or programs which interrupt, destroy, limit the functionality of, or cause damage to the Site or any computer software or hardware or telecommunications equipment.

 

[*] Yes. I have read and agree to the terms of use. :P:lol:

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While reading the entire guidelines document is always a good idea, whether for newcomers or for experienced hiders who need a refresher*, a summary of the changes is a nice thing to have. So I wrote one. The recent changes to the geocache listing guidelines are being discussed over here in the Geocaching.com Forum. Questions about the changes can be posted there and I will be happy to respond.

 

*Edit: Like, hypothetically, somebody might have forgotten or overlooked a sentence in the guidelines that's been there forever and hasn't changed.... say, the sentence in the maintenance guidelines about deleting logs that appear to be bogus, counterfeit, etc. Just fer instance.

Edited by Keystone
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Thanks, Keystone.

 

Funny, I did a search on cache guidelines, 30 days ago and newer (all forums), and couldn't find that topic. The search did, however, bring me to this topic. :o:P

That would be because most people don't say the phrase "cache guidelines." My posts as a site volunteer tend to use the formal term "Geocache Listing Requirements / Guidelines."

 

The thread would have turned up had you run a search for the terms: "cache and guidelines".

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While reading the entire guidelines document is always a good idea, whether for newcomers or for experienced hiders who need a refresher*, a summary of the changes is a nice thing to have.  So I wrote one.  The recent changes to the geocache listing guidelines are being discussed over here in the Geocaching.com Forum.  Questions about the changes can be posted there and I will be happy to respond.

 

*Edit:  Like, hypothetically, somebody might have forgotten or overlooked a sentence in the guidelines that's been there forever and hasn't changed.... say, the sentence in the maintenance guidelines about deleting logs that appear to be bogus, counterfeit, etc.  Just fer instance.

Oh, like me.

I dunno, maybe someone does need to take a test! :P:o

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