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Geocaching, Hunters And Safety Vests


earthshaker
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In almost 30 years of hunting, I've had contact with hundreds of hunters. Of those hundreds, one was drunk.

I'd say the odds favor sobriety.

 

I personally can't imagine somebody taking the time to scout out a tree stand location, sit there for days at a time, then ruin all his/her hard work by shooting a dog. Just for the record, a bowhunter would not mistake a pooch for a coyote. I'm a pretty decent shot with a bow and my max range is 40 yards. At that close of a distance, pooches do not look like coyotes.

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5 cent...

 

You do realize that the odds of a hunter shooting you for being in the woods are about equal to that of you suffereing a fatal infection from your own dog biting you, don't you? You're FAR FAR FAR FAR FAR more likely to be killed by a drunk driver on your way to the cache than to be even injured by a hunter.

 

Odds are, if you encounter a hunter in the woods and are polite, you will recieve the same treatment. The thing is, the public always hears about the bad eggs that do stupid things while they're hunting. You never hear about the thousands that silently slip into the woods every day, obey all of the laws, and support our lands. But which group does the public think about?

 

If you're so afraid and untrusting of a group of people you apparantly don't really know much about....

 

Stay home.

 

EDIT 5cent...I just noticed your forum title "One day common sense will prevail". How ironic.

Edited by dkwolf
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There are bad apples in every bunch. I don't appreciate the stereotype that hunters shoot first and identify their targets later, or that all hunters drink a lot while waiting for something to move in front of them.

 

I've never taken a drink while hunting, and I've never shot at anything I hadn't identified first. I don't know any hunters that would.

 

2nd rifle season opens Saturday in Colorado. I'll have my blaze vest and beanie on and a .30-06 over my shoulder. There's only one cache within 12 miles of camp, and that one was placed by a fellow hunter. I promise not to shoot you if you come find it this weekend B)

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I've never taken a drink while hunting, and I've never shot at anything I hadn't identified first. I don't know any hunters that would.

EXACTLY!!! Sure, my buddy and I enjoyed some cold ones this weekend, but that was after the deer was hanging in his garage and we were halfway through deboning it to send the meat to a locker. And EVERY hunter I know is the same exact way. And it's a standing rule in my group, no drinks until after the shooting is done. (trap shooting, target shooting, or hunting)

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I am jumping out of this thread after this. I guess my points are there is a reason they tell people to where blaze orange if you are going to be in the woods during hunting season. It is a safety precaution so that a hunter won't mistake you for something else. But wait, since all hunters identify their game before they pull the trigger or draw back, I guess it is just a conspiracy by the blaze orange dye manufacturers and the government as a way to get rid of their hard to sell colored products.

 

The other point is while I believe what everyone here is saying about not having a few cold ones while up in the tree. I personally know quite a few people who get pretty lit while up in their tree stands, and know of a guy who has shot at a dog because he heard something moving around in some brush and fired off a pop shot.

 

I know another guy who every year sits in a tree stand with a 12 pack of beer and smokes while up there and bags a deer every year. I know another guy who goes to the extent of covering himself in deer urine (i believe that is what it is) and only scores a deer every other year or so.

 

I guess the point is that if every hunter was a perfect hunter, no one would have to even worry a bit about walking through the woods in street clothes during hunting season. But all hunters are not all perfect, that's how the blaze orange fabric manufacturers stay in business. I am not going to throw caution to the wind because the 10 guys in this forum who are hunters say don't worry about because "we personally don't know anyone who would mistake you for a deer."

 

I did not mean to start any angst, but it seams no one here wants to admit the fact that accidents happen with hunters and that some hunters do drink. I think everyone has the right to worry about the minority of hunters who don't do things right.

 

But I will follow along with what all you guys have said and not worry about stuff, return the blaze orange sweatshirt I got, and go hunt the cache with no regard to worries or the hunter now, as I gave him respect yesterday and got out of his way, so I guess today is his day to suck it up and watch me hunt a cache. B)

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I personally know of a guy who has shot at a dog because he heard something moving around in some brush and fired off a pop shot.

I think you're confusing archery season with general gun season. Bowhunters don't "fire pop shots"

 

But I will follow along with what all you guys have said and not worry about stuff

A careful search of this thread revealed that the vast majority of hunters all concur that wearing safety orange is a good idea. It seems your real efforts are focused entirely upon exaggeration.

 

but it seams no one here wants to admit the fact that accidents happen with hunters and that some hunters do drink

Gosh, I don't recall anybody saying that accidents don't happen. Another exageration, perhaps?

 

  guess it is just a conspiracy by the blaze orange dye manufacturers and the government as a way to get rid of their hard to sell colored products.

Maybe it's a conspiracy to avoid knee jerk, emotional responses from folks who don't understand the concept of hunting. I've always wondered how somebody with no moral credibility, such as Hillary Clinton, could get elected as a Senator. After reading your angst filled posts and looking at your avatar, it's all becoming much clearer now.

Just a thought...if you'd stick to reality, and avoid blowing everything out of proportion, your opinion would be welcome.

 

I am jumping out of this thread after this

C-ya!

Edited by Clan Riffster
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I am jumping out of this thread after this. I guess my points are there is a reason they tell people to where blaze orange if you are going to be in the woods during hunting season. It is a safety precaution so that a hunter won't mistake you for something else. But wait, since all hunters identify their game before they pull the trigger or draw back, I guess it is just a conspiracy by the blaze orange dye manufacturers and the government as a way to get rid of their hard to sell colored products.

 

The other point is while I believe what everyone here is saying about not having a few cold ones while up in the tree. I personally know quite a few people who get pretty lit while up in their tree stands, and know of a guy who has shot at a dog because he heard something moving around in some brush and fired off a pop shot.

 

I know another guy who every year sits in a tree stand with a 12 pack of beer and smokes while up there and bags a deer every year. I know another guy who goes to the extent of covering himself in deer urine (i believe that is what it is) and only scores a deer every other year or so.

 

I guess the point is that if every hunter was a perfect hunter, no one would have to even worry a bit about walking through the woods in street clothes during hunting season. But all hunters are not all perfect, that's how the blaze orange fabric manufacturers stay in business. I am not going to throw caution to the wind because the 10 guys in this forum who are hunters say don't worry about because "we personally don't know anyone who would mistake you for a deer."

 

I did not mean to start any angst, but it seams no one here wants to admit the fact that accidents happen with hunters and that some hunters do drink. I think everyone has the right to worry about the minority of hunters who don't do things right.

 

But I will follow along with what all you guys have said and not worry about stuff, return the blaze orange sweatshirt I got, and go hunt the cache with no regard to worries or the hunter now, as I gave him respect yesterday and got out of his way, so I guess today is his day to suck it up and watch me hunt a cache. :(

 

This is just some poor logic

 

1) "I guess it is just a conspiracy by the blaze orange dye manufacturers and the government as a way to get rid of their hard to sell colored products." - Nope, its common sense and safety. The great majority of hunters (of which I am one) identify their targets before they shoot. But accidents do happen, and wearing orange helps to lessen the incident of those accidents. A valid analogy is motorists. No motorist wants to hit people, and no sane motorist goes out looking to hit people, yet crossing guards and traffic control officers wear orange vests. Well, why do they have to wear them, if nobody is trying to hit them, and everybody is driving safely, they should not have to wear them. Same reason - accidents do happen, and if something as simple as wearing an orange vest can avert just one accident - either from hunting or driving - isn't it worth it?

 

2) I myself do not know any hunters that drink while hunting (I know several that drink AFTER hunting) I personally would not want to associate myself with anybody who does drink while shooting, perhaps that’s why I do not know any who do. I do not doubt that you know some hunters that do drink while hunting. But the point that I am trying to make, and that I believe the others hunters in this thread were trying to make, is that the vast majority of hunters are very safe and responsible people. We, as hunters, will admit that there are bad apples in the bunch, but we take umbrage when we are all painted with the same brush. We all know there are people who drink and drive out there, but there are also a lot of responsible drivers out there who would never get behind the wheel while intoxicated. Yet nobody ever makes the statement "watch out when you go walking down the street, because you don't want to get hit by those drunken drivers that are all over the place" . Nobody says to you "Oh, you have a drivers license, you must be an irresponsible drunkard". It is that broad stereotyping that gets most hunter’s hackles up.

 

So, just as you would wear an orange vest if you were directing traffic, or would look both ways when crossing the street - even at a light, you should still wear orange in the woods during hunting seasons. The vast majority of hunters are safe and sober, but accidents can and will happen, and an orange vest can help prevent them. Just as you would not call a person irresponsible because they have a drivers license, you should not do the same just because they have a hunting license.

 

-dave

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The other point is while I believe what everyone here is saying about not having a few cold ones while up in the tree.  I personally know quite a few people who get pretty lit while up in their tree stands, and know of a guy who has shot at a dog because he heard something moving around in some brush and fired off a pop shot.

 

<snip>

 

I guess the point is that if every hunter was a perfect hunter, no one would have to even worry a bit about walking through the woods in street clothes during hunting season.  But all hunters are not all perfect, that's how the blaze orange fabric manufacturers stay in business.  I am not going to throw caution to the wind because the 10 guys in this forum who are hunters say don't worry about because "we personally don't know anyone who would mistake you for a deer."

Buddy, I'm not disputing that there are a few hunters that go out and ruin it for the rest of us. I'm saying that they are very much in the minority. YOU HAVE A BETTER CHANCE DYING ON THE WAY TO THE CACHE THAN BEING SHOT SEEKING THE CACHE. Don't see people getting worked up about that though. Do you automatically assume that the car coming your way on the highway is a drunk driver? Do you automatically assume the guy you meet on a dark street is going to mug you? This whole argument is a lot like saying any man wandering around a park where kids are playing is a child molester and pedophile. Sure, a few of them are, but a lot of geocachers, good decent people, have taken heat as a result of them.

 

We have airbags, seat belts, and anti-lock brakes in cars to help protect us in a crash. There are self defense products on the market to protect you if you frequent areas where personal attack is possible. And there is high visibilty clothing to make your presence known in areas where hunters may be shooting at game. All safety measures, all measures you should use.

Edited by dkwolf
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There are bad apples in every bunch. I don't appreciate the stereotype that hunters shoot first and identify their targets later, or that all hunters drink a lot while waiting for something to move in front of them.

 

I've never taken a drink while hunting, and I've never shot at anything I hadn't identified first. I don't know any hunters that would.

I totally agree, very nicely said!

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The Wisconsin report has some interesting statistics-

 

weather conditions - majority by far were daylight (as opposed to dusk, dawn, or night), cloudy (presumably overcast, implying flat lighting), and raining (if you add foggy, you get to 50 percent). 76 percent were daylight, not the dusk (3 %) or dawn (also 3%) that several have said are the favorite hunting times.

 

70% of the incidents were Sat and Sun (35% each) - probably because more hunters were out and about.

 

I note that muzzle loaders (my current guns) and bow have the lowest involvement.

 

Wooded areas were 43%, which may reflect visibility/ease of identification/concealment of victim beyond the intended target. Squirrel (22%) and deer (18%) were the object of the hunt, for the largest percentages. This probably reflects the distribution of hunters more than the misidentified target. 93% members of the same party. 100% males!!! Is this sexist or what? (no, don't tell me women don't hunt).

 

The two largest experience groups were less than 5 years (38%), and more than 20 years (32%). Largest age group by far was kids 12-17 (29%). Vast majority had not had hunter education (54%). Of the victims, 57% had been hunting less than 5 years.

 

Two largest muzzle-victim distance groups were 11-20 and 21-50 yards - which says "shoulda seen'm", except 76% coud not see the victim.

 

Personal history - hunted when I was a kid (that supplied a significant part of the family food), quit after being shot at while getting my buck back to camp one season (it was a "sound" shot). Current next door neighbor was shot while hunting - fits a lot of the Wisconsin categories, except for years of experience and had hunter safety course (and he had an orange vest on). Lived in the Deep South for several years, where the main activity of the annual "hunting camp" was drinking cases of brew, then seeing how far you could drive the 4WD into the swamp before getting stuck.

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weather conditions - majority by far were daylight (as opposed to dusk, dawn, or night), cloudy (presumably overcast, implying flat lighting), and raining (if you add foggy, you get to 50 percent). 76 percent were daylight, not the dusk (3 %) or dawn (also 3%) that several have said are the favorite hunting times.

 

Last year’s 9 day deer season was cloudy and raining all 9 days. That would definitely explain these results.

 

70% of the incidents were Sat and Sun (35% each) - probably because more hunters were out and about.

 

That makes sense as well. Probably 70% of hunters only hunt on the weekends. Also, hunter densities are highest at those times.

 

Wooded areas were 43%, which may reflect visibility/ease of identification/concealment of victim beyond the intended target.

 

Also logical- I am actually surprised it was this low. After all, most hunting is done in the woods.

 

Squirrel (22%) and deer (18%) were the object of the hunt, for the largest percentages.

 

This is a problem when the overall numbers of incidents are so low- the numbers are easily skewed. For example, the percentages for the year before were 58% deer and only 3% squirrel, quite different that the next year.

 

The two largest experience groups were less than 5 years (38%),.
Largest age group by far was kids 12-17 (29%). Vast majority had not had hunter education (54%).

 

These statistics seem somewhat contradictory- all hunters born after Jan 1, 1970 (32 years old last year) are required to have taken and passed a hunter’s safety course before they are allowed to buy a hunting liscense. Another example of taking statistics from such a small group.

 

Also, the 12-17 group is typically the least likely to be involved in an accident.

 

The previous year’s report the 12-17 year old group tied for the lowest percentage with the 20-29 group and the 30-39 group at 6% each. 40-49 group, 50-59 group, and the 60+ group accounted for 64% of incidents.

 

I am also not sure that 54% quite constitutes a "vast majority":D

 

Two largest muzzle-victim distance groups were 11-20 and 21-50 yards - which says "shoulda seen'm", except 76% coud not see the victim.

 

That is why orange is so important.

The most common “excuse” used is that they were swinging on game and the victim was in the line of fire when the trigger was pulled. That orange sure does make it easier to see out of the corner of your eye- it sticks out enough that you will often see it even when you are concentrating on the deer.

 

Lived in the Deep South for several years, where the main activity of the annual "hunting camp" was drinking cases of brew, then seeing how far you could drive the 4WD into the swamp before getting stuck.

 

First of all, It sounds like you needed to find a different "hunting" camp.

 

Second, I can go into nearly any tavern on any night and find people that are drinking, many more than they should. The majority of these people will be driving home. Using this "proof" would it be fair of me to say that "drivers are all drunks"?

 

In ANY group of people, you are going to have some bad apples. It is patently unfair to judge a whole group on the activities of a few bad apples.

Edited by Docapi
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I could make my point by dredging up some of the recent publicity surrounding geocaching, but I won't. People in EVERY recreation (and walk of life, for that matter) make mistakes. Those people DO NOT represent the majority of folks participating in that activity. Nor, do they represent the activity itself.

 

I have been a witness to two hunting accidents in my time. One victim was a Dodge 4X4. The other was a living room window.

 

I have been all over the world. I have seen violence and recklessness that would make your skin crawl. Driving in Italy is a life or death proposition all its own. Hunting is an extremely safe activity. The same guy who drinks while / before hunting (and there are a few), is the same guy who drinks before he drives your kid's school bus or repairs your brakes down at the garage. This is not a reflection on hunting as a whole any more than someone placing an ammo can in a school parking lot is a geocaching as a whole.

 

Point made?

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Found this site on the web today.

 

http://www.all-creatures.org/cash/accident-center.html

Hunting is VERY safe, acording to that link. I mean, I could make a page of links to news stories about people winning the lottery that would be much longer then that list. Those links cover the entire world, and every one I've looked at so far was either self inflicted (most of them), involved another hunter, and even one where the hunter was killed by the huntee.

Edited by Mopar
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Found this site on the web today.

 

http://www.all-creatures.org/cash/accident-center.html

Hunting is VERY safe, acording to that link. I mean, I could make a page of links to news stories about people winning the lottery that would be much longer then that list. Those links cover the entire world, and every one I've looked at so far was either self inflicted (most of them), involved another hunter, and even one where the hunter was killed by the huntee.

You'd think an organization committed to abolishing hunting would be happy the deer are fighting back...

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Found this site on the web today.

 

http://www.all-creatures.org/cash/accident-center.html

HA! If the mods think this is going off topic, just check the name of the group behind that link! ;)

Number one all I stated is that I came across this on the web today. I made no statement either for or against it. How then is this off topic? It speaks of the fact of accidents happening out there. Period! Just because you don't like something does not make it off topic!

Edited by Frankyguy
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Number one all I stated is that I came across this on the web today. I made no statement either for or against it. How then is this off topic? It speaks of the fact of accidents happening out there.  Period!  Just because you don't like something does not make it off topic!

I think what Mopar was trying to allude to was the name of the site you posted is "CASH Hunting Accident Report Center", which if you say it out loud without reading it could be "CACHE Hunting Accident Report Center."

 

While Mopar's suggestion was a stretch at best, this thread is now off-topic to the original post (that asked "What is the overall feeling within the group about safety vests being used when caching?"). Please take it back on-topic or it will need to be closed. If you would like to continue the discussion as it is right now, feel free to start one (or participate in one if it is already there) in the Off-Topic forum.

Edited by Quiggle
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Number one all I stated is that I came across this on the web today. I made no statement either for or against it. How then is this off topic? It speaks of the fact of accidents happening out there.  Period!  Just because you don't like something does not make it off topic!

I think what Mopar was trying to allude to was the name of the site you posted is "CASH Hunting Accident Report Center", which if you say it out loud without reading it could be "CACHE Hunting Accident Report Center."

 

While Mopar's suggestion was a stretch at best, this thread is now off-topic to the original post (that asked "What is the overall feeling within the group about safety vests being used when caching?"). Please take it back on-topic or it will need to be closed. If you would like to continue the discussion as it is right now, feel free to start one (or participate in one if it is already there) in the Off-Topic forum.

Well thanks for the offer, but no thanks. Please remove my membership to Groundspeak and Geocaching.com as I see no reason to continue to be part of this uncontrolled one sided insanity or how the endangering of peoples lives is taken so lightly just so a very small few can satisfy their ungodly blood lusts! Now they can mock this posting too and claim it's off topic! I quess we all know they would be signing a different tune if they or a loved one was shot and wounded or killed by one of these drunken half-witted irresponsible clowns in the woods while geocaching on public land they have a right to be on without fear for their lives.

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Number one all I stated is that I came across this on the web today. I made no statement either for or against it. How then is this off topic? It speaks of the fact of accidents happening out there.  Period!  Just because you don't like something does not make it off topic!

I think what Mopar was trying to allude to was the name of the site you posted is "CASH Hunting Accident Report Center", which if you say it out loud without reading it could be "CACHE Hunting Accident Report Center."

 

While Mopar's suggestion was a stretch at best, this thread is now off-topic to the original post (that asked "What is the overall feeling within the group about safety vests being used when caching?"). Please take it back on-topic or it will need to be closed. If you would like to continue the discussion as it is right now, feel free to start one (or participate in one if it is already there) in the Off-Topic forum.

Well thanks for the offer, but no thanks. Please remove my membership to Groundspeak and Geocaching.com as I see no reason to continue to be part of this uncontrolled one sided insanity or how the endangering of peoples lives is taken so lightly just so a very small few can satisfy their ungodly blood lusts! Now they can mock this posting too and claim it's off topic! I quess we all know they would be signing a different tune if they or a loved one was shot and wounded or killed by one of these drunken half-witted irresponsible clowns in the woods while geocaching on public land they have a right to be on without fear for their lives.

Hopefully in before the lock.

So, how many of those news stories (spaning many years and many countries) are about innocent people just out for a hike getting shot by a drunken hunter, as opposed to other hunters, who I'm sure you think were justly punished for their bloodlust?

 

Oh, and NEXT time you want to geocide, please use this thread.

Edited by Mopar
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Number one all I stated is that I came across this on the web today. I made no statement either for or against it. How then is this off topic? It speaks of the fact of accidents happening out there.  Period!  Just because you don't like something does not make it off topic!

I think what Mopar was trying to allude to was the name of the site you posted is "CASH Hunting Accident Report Center", which if you say it out loud without reading it could be "CACHE Hunting Accident Report Center."

 

While Mopar's suggestion was a stretch at best, this thread is now off-topic to the original post (that asked "What is the overall feeling within the group about safety vests being used when caching?"). Please take it back on-topic or it will need to be closed. If you would like to continue the discussion as it is right now, feel free to start one (or participate in one if it is already there) in the Off-Topic forum.

Well thanks for the offer, but no thanks. Please remove my membership to Groundspeak and Geocaching.com as I see no reason to continue to be part of this uncontrolled one sided insanity or how the endangering of peoples lives is taken so lightly just so a very small few can satisfy their ungodly blood lusts! Now they can mock this posting too and claim it's off topic! I quess we all know they would be signing a different tune if they or a loved one was shot and wounded or killed by one of these drunken half-witted irresponsible clowns in the woods while geocaching on public land they have a right to be on without fear for their lives.

So..........where do I find that emoticon for my head exploding?

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5 cent...

 

You do realize that the odds of a hunter shooting you for being in the woods are about equal to that of you suffereing a fatal infection from your own dog biting you, don't you? You're FAR FAR FAR FAR FAR more likely to be killed by a drunk driver on your way to the cache than to be even injured by a hunter.

 

Odds are, if you encounter a hunter in the woods and are polite, you will recieve the same treatment. The thing is, the public always hears about the bad eggs that do stupid things while they're hunting. You never hear about the thousands that silently slip into the woods every day, obey all of the laws, and support our lands. But which group does the public think about?

 

If you're so afraid and untrusting of a group of people you apparantly don't really know much about....

 

Stay home.

 

EDIT 5cent...I just noticed your forum title "One day common sense will prevail". How ironic.

Actually its alot higher. I can remember being in the brush looking for a cache and when I came out a hunter was walking over the ridge with his vest and shotgun. He had a vest on, I didnt, and luckily his weapon wasnt pointed at me. It was the fact that I saw him 500 feet away and he didnt see me that made me leave that day without a cache find.

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(...) I can remember being in the brush looking for a cache and when I came out a hunter was walking over the ridge with his vest and shotgun. He had a vest on, I didnt, and luckily his weapon wasnt pointed at me. It was the fact that I saw him 500 feet away and he didnt see me that made me leave that day without a cache find.

I'll just comment on the caching aspect: taking a DNF on the cache seems like a sensible and prudent thing to do in this case. Given a choice between a DNF and doing something that feels unsafe, I'll take that blue frowny-face any day of the week! I'd also note that you being able to see the hunter with his vest at 500 feet while not being seen yourself underscores the usefulness of wearing blaze orange garb when caching during hunting season - it's a remarkably visible color. :mad:

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Don't hunt in southwest PA.

 

We are hicks, we don't look, we shoot at what moves. If you take the chance, you probably will be, through our drunk eyes, a deer/turkey/something that moves.

 

Tried to get into the shoes of a local there....anyways....no I won't cache, but I will hunt.

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Um, whats wrong with drinking and hunting? It's definitetly two of my favorite activities. When I'm sitting in the stand and I'm so tired I can barely keep my eyes open, I break out a small bottle of Hot Dam and then everything around me starts to sparkle, again. Just because I'm drinking doesn't mean I'm drunk. A bit of alcohol can actually heighten awareness. Someone that is fatigued (not drunk) can be very dangerous as well. I know that too much alcohol can cause drowsiness and intoxication.

Edited by clearpath
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It has been a couple of years since I've been hunting, but for the record, I don't wear blaze orange when hunting. Why? My choice. I'd rather not be seen.

 

If I had caches available to search in areas that are also hunting areas, I'd cut (my fellow) hunters some slack and consider it is the hunters' time in the woods during hunting season. I (as a geocacher) would have the rest of the year to do my thing in those same woods.

 

Be a good neighbor / partner in the use of our natural resources. Be considerate of each other's hobbies and sports.

 

Ken

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There are slob hunters as well as slob geocachers.  Probably the same percentage of drunks in both crowds, too. 

Yes, but a "Slob Geocacher" is not likely to kill anyone with his GPSr

I worry about the "Bozo" on his first hunting trip, with a doe permit and a

.44magnum, ready to shoot anything that moved ! B)

Last year I took my ex-wife, gave her a fur coat and Rudolph hat and everything. ;)

 

Anyway, I confine my walks in the woods this time of year to woods in the city.

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There are slob hunters as well as slob geocachers.  Probably the same percentage of drunks in both crowds, too. 

Yes, but a "Slob Geocacher" is not likely to kill anyone with his GPSr

I worry about the "Bozo" on his first hunting trip, with a doe permit and a

.44magnum, ready to shoot anything that moved ! B)

Last year I took my ex-wife, gave her a fur coat and Rudolph hat and everything. ;)

 

Anyway, I confine my walks in the woods this time of year to woods in the city.

You can rail about the dangers of "slob hunters" who shoot at anything that moves, but in reality it is extremely rare that a non hunter is killed by a hunter. You can probably count the incidents over the past 10 years on one hand.

 

Its irresponsible to try to promote the idea that there are drunken hunters popping off hikers all over the place. It doesn't happen.

 

Its equally irresponsible for the hunters here to pretend that there aren't a lot of guys who are in the woods with guns who shouldn't be, and sometimnes they are drunk. Fortunatley for us hikers and geocachers their victims are usually 'no trespassing" signs and a few unfortunate squirrels and chipmunks.

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Here's my opinion...

 

I think that it's sad that some cachers view hunters as 'opponents.'

 

Hunters are licensed users of the same spaces we like to use for geocaching. Their efforts have opened up many forest areas for recreational use. My father, an avid hunter, has started geocaching because he likes to be outdoors with a purpose when it's not hunting season. He loves the fact that he can waypoint his stands and blinds. He is an example of how the community of hunters is a ready-made group of promising new members to the geocaching community.

 

Furthermore, if there's a group of sportsmen and sportswomen from whom we could take a page, it's hunters. They have repeatedly shown how to work within the political and community systems to educate folks about hunting and its benefits while protecting and enhancing their right to participate in the sport.

 

Speaking for myself, I'd like to extend a hand to the hunting community to join the geocaching community, and I offer my thanks to them for blazing the alternative-use-of-public-lands trail that we as the geocaching community are now traveling down.

 

And, my wife says I look great in orange, it's my color. Go figure.

 

- T of TandS

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HEADLINE: Bowhunter does not shoot Geocacher!

 

A few days ago while sitting in my stand bowhunting I had a moment of excitement when a movement caught my eye. It turned out to be a geocacher walking the trail. How do I know he was a cacher?

 

1: There is a cache in the direction he was headed.

2: He had the cacher "walk" going- head down looking at GPSr/papers/trail.

3: That night when I got home and logged in I checked the cache webpage...He had logged the find.

 

To keep this on topic...He was not wearing an orange vest or hat but did have a black and red coat on. The orange would have been a much better idea. Needless to say he walked right on by and does not even know I was there...BUT...being the warped individual that I am I was tempted to let out a very loud blood curdling scream B) Not knowing the person (does he have a bad ticker? No sense of humor?) I chose not to. I did, however, spend the rest of the evening giggling my a.. off at the thought of his reaction ;)

 

Stay safe out there!

T*B*

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...BUT...being the warped individual that I am I was tempted to let out a very loud blood curdling scream  ;)  Not knowing the person (does he have a bad ticker? No sense of humor?) I chose not to.

:mad: If the situation should ever arise again, rather than stifling a blood-curdling scream, might I suggest you instead start calling out (in a deep, resonant voice):

 

Warm ...

Warmer ...

Colder! ...

Red hot!

 

If the cacher still can't spot where your voice is coming from, make sure you proclaim yourself to be "Jeremy, Patron Saint of Lost Cachers", responding to the prayers of the faithful. Insist the cacher compose a hymn in their online log to praise and thank you for guiding them to the cache.

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