Jump to content

Most Fantastic Find?


foxtrot_xray

Recommended Posts

I had a fantastic find earlier this week, and I thougt that others had to have had as interesting finds, and thougt it'd be interesting to hear them..

 

My amazing find was EE0068. The small map is actually incorrect, due to the scaling and such. The directions are accurate, however.

 

I leave my office at 6:00pm. This day, I had an itch to go find a couple.. I had printed them out at work, studied over them and maps, Leave the office, and have a 45 minute drive, normally to get up to home, close to these marks. For some reason, traffic is awful, and I finally get up there at 7:15pm. Sun is setting, time is very limited.

I got for this one first, since it's the longest walk (about .75 mile one way). It's along the rail line that I do part-time work for, so I'm not too worried about tresspassing. Thery normally stop at 5pm every day, so I wasn't too worried about getting run over, either. Listening to my MP3 player, I start walking. See a few deer, a turkey, a gunshot (poor turkey..), and then eventually get to the referenced mile marker. I spend a good 15 minutes marking off everything. The directions say it's a ''FLAT ROCK LEDGE'' that preojects SW from a rock ledge. Well, sorry to say, there are rocks everywhere. And no 'ledge' that close to the ground. By now i'ts about 7:45, and getting darker out by the minute. I do one more look around, don't see anyhting, and start heading back.

I took five steps, eyes peeled at the ground - hey, you never know - and stopped. There was a small rock peeking out from the bed of dead leaves. So I bend over, push leaves out of the way, and dig around, looking for a 'flat' rock, like the description says. Not coming up with anything, and rather dissapointed, I looked at the rock that caught my eye, and ran my fingers over it. Sure enough, right there, was the friggin' cross. Take pictures, and start heading back, listening to my music.

Now, there';s an interstate about a mile away from this line, and another 4-lane highway as well. So at that time of the day, you could hear the traffic. I'm walking, and hear a really loud truck from the highway. I stop and listen, assuring that it was a truck on the 4lane or something, and continue walking. After a few moments, I notice that the sound is getting louder. I stop, and listen again. Sure enough, it's a constant noise, still a distance away, but definately NOT from the highway. It couldn't be a train, they don't run this late. I wait, listening, and sure enough, then I hear the squeal of a rail as the forest begins to grow brightly around the corner.

A darn locomotive comes around the corner, and seeing me, begins to slow (procedure in an area like this; tho i had a safety vest on.) I wait, as he gets closer, standing off to the side, of course. About 20 feet away, he applies his brakes, and slows down to stop, right in front of me.

The engineer sticks out his head from the window, and says, "Fox! What're you doing out here? Need a ride?" It's one of the engineer's I'm usually paired off with. I climb aboard, and get a ride back to my car, explaining to them along the way what the hell I WAS going out there in the middle of nowehre.

Much to the chagrin of the late rush-hour commuters, the engineer stopped the train on the crossing, and let me get off to head back to my car.

 

So, all in all, a very successful find. :lol: Got any interesting stories?

 

Fox.

Link to post

I'm wary of even looking around a grade crossing, and am generally staying off RR ROWs these days, and crazy Fox heads down the track WITH AN MP3 PLAYER!!!

 

Is it just me? Is that absolutely insane?

 

Having said that, great yarn, and I'm jealous ... I've never hitchhiked a ride on a train.

 

-ArtMan-

Link to post

We've seen personal reports here where people were surprised by trains. Listening to headphones must raise the risk factor by an order of magnitude or two. Natural selection was being tempted here. But the fallout for the rest of us might be tighter enforcement, and I do like checking out grade crossings, so please don't take unnecessary risks.

 

BH

Link to post

Every time I go on railroad tracks I see a train, most often when I am near the tracks. Today I crossed the tracks two times and just after I got across the second time a train came along. This is on the Amtrak line from Philly to Harrisburg, where trains run about once an hour, so my luck is either really good or really bad!

 

Even though I know these Amtrak trains are infrequent, I assume that whenever I get on the tracks a train will come by, so I behave appropriately and look carefully both ways, never walk on or near the tracks (these trains go 70+ mph, so just walking close can get you in trouble, or dead). Amtrak's security in this area is almost nonexistent, especially on weekends and holidays, so that is not a big concern. But the trains ARE.

 

When I sneak onto Norfolk Southern lines I know that the trains are more frequent, noisier, and less likely to sneak up on me, but the railroad police are MUCH more likely to do so. They aren't fatal, but could certainly cause some trouble. When I head onto NS property I make sure I have a quick way out, NEVER stand on railroad property when a train comes by (they have radios and are known to call tresspassers in to the dispatcher). And I am vigilant to the point of neurosis, looking around me for anything out of the norm.

 

No MP3 player, I can say that.

Link to post

About 20 feet away, he applies his brakes, and slows down to stop, right in front of me.

The engineer sticks out his head from the window, and says, "Fox! What're you doing out here? Need a ride?" It's one of the engineer's I'm usually paired off with.

Fox.

 

Miss something? I added the color.

 

Most adults have some common sense when around tracks & trains.

 

John

Link to post

Like others who responded, I was uncomfortable with someone wearing headphones and listening to music while walking along a railroad track. I believe the fact that the individual was surprised by the locomotive is an indication that familiarity has caused a lowering of caution.

 

Meanwhile, I am surprised that nobody commented on this:

See a few deer, a turkey, a gunshot (poor turkey..), and then eventually get to the referenced mile marker.

-Paul-

 

_____________________________________________________

A woman was going to surprise her husband by learning to hunt,

so she could join him in his hobby. She bought a gun and ammo,

and headed into the woods to practice tracking deer.

 

Suddenly, seeing movement ahead of her, she fired. As she ran up

to the site, a man was standing over the animal, looking down at it.

 

"That's MY deer," the woman yelled. "You can't have it."

 

"Fine, Lady," said the man, eyeing her wildly-pointing rifle.

"Just let me get my saddle off of it and it's yours."

________________________________________________________

Link to post
I believe the fact that the individual was surprised by the locomotive is an indication that familiarity has caused a lowering of caution.

____________________________________________

 

:lol:

 

The only surprise is that the train is running that late. He heard a sound & then stood and listen for some time because it was a constant noise not typical of the highway.

 

The real surprise is that the conductor waited until he was 20 feet away to apply the brakes and was able to stop right in front of him.

 

John

 

Edited to add: I thought this thread was about great finds?

Edited by 2oldfarts (the rockhounders)
Link to post
The only surprise is that the train is running that late. He heard a sound & then stood and listen for some time because it was a constant noise not typical of the highway.

The real surprise is that the conductor waited until he was 20 feet away to apply the brakes and was able to stop right in front of him.

John

To ease the worries of everyone - yeah, I work for that particular RR. it's a shortline - NOT a class I (like CSX, Norfolk, UPRR, etc.) where if a train hits you you turn into a splotch on the window. Max allowed speed is 10MPH - and at this point it was uphill, so they were able to stop on the mark. :laughing:

 

I DON'T advocate tresspassing on RR property (or any land, for that matter!), espically since many of the marks along high-usage lines are now either torn up due to realignment or levelling, or buried under 4+ feel of ballast. And yeah, espically now-a-days, they're much more likely to report you due to 'possible terrorist threats'. (No, I'm not suggesting we start talking about that, either..)

 

And, I'll be the first to say, I was an idiot. I never listen to anything when I'm out finding other marks, not even entirely sure why I decided to that time. So, there. I admit it, not the smarted thing to do. :laughing:

 

And no, the turkey didn't actually get shot. (THo I did hear them hunting out there, which is why I was glad I wore my vest.)

 

And yeah, I like the story of the tree with a hole in it. Interesting little find. :D

 

Cheers,

Fox.

Link to post

Define 'great/fantastic finds'. :laughing: I've found a couple that haven't been reported since 1935. Those I consider 'great finds'. (though I've probably bragged about them already... LY0421). Actually a very easy find...

And, yes, I do wander along the New York and Susquehanna tracks on weekends. Probably because there are so many benchmarks there.

I've done a few that have been tough to get to, but that's by New Jersey standards. :laughing: Of course, I'll have to go back to LY2562 to get the RMs, both new and old!

Link to post

Like Harry......I am sure I have already bragged every time I have a GREAT FIND..............my mountain top finds: the 1853 brass pin, 1858 drilled hole and 1876 chiseled triangle that wasn't recovered since the day it was put in.

 

I have lost track of the amount of 1930's marks I have recovered but am especially fond of the one that neither NGS nor USPSQD could find, or the mark along with the entire bridge that the ME DOT could not find.

 

But lets be honest......that mark we have all found that was just down the street but took 6 attempts over 12 months to find........that is also a GREAT FIND !

Link to post

Well, I can't claim it was particularly difficult, but I am proud to have been the first to log HV4442.

 

While good logs at Geocaching.com are worthwhile, I think what gives me the most pleasure in this hobby is the considerable number of reports I've made to NGS — many for the first time in decades — to update this important national database.

 

-ArtMan-

Link to post

I am pretty new at benchmark hunting, although seasoned at cache finds. I find now that I have to drive more than an hour to find more than a couple of caches, benchmark hunting opens a whole new world of seaching opportunities practically in my own back yard.

 

I've been seriously "marking" for about a month now, with some very satisfying finds, but this past weekend I found a "lightly chiseled cross" that was first documented in 1935 by NGS and then was reported "not Found" in 1960. That's the last documented report. It is on the horizontal toprail (or iron caisson as described in the NGS report) of a bridge that is no longer used, but this part has been preserved as a place of interest in a county park. I got wildly excited; remember I'm new and my enthusiasm hasn't been quashed yet. The idea of finding a piece of history that was thought to be lost was intriguing.

 

Should I submit the photo and info to NGS (Deb Brown)? Or just let it be and be satisfied that it's on the benchmark page?

 

If you want to take a look at the picture, you can see it here.

http://www.geocaching.com/mark/details.aspx?PID=AK0153

 

Thanks for any input.

 

overrover

Link to post

What a great find, overrover! BRAVO ZULU !

 

(and by the way, I hope your enthusiasm is NEVER quashed.)

 

As for filing with NGS, I will defer my remarks to that of others here. I am not sure that I do it correctly myself.

 

Keep up the good work!

Link to post

I don't understand how Sue Gremlin's post is relevant to our discussion, but...

I've heard of this cache. Can't say that I'm particularly interested in doing it.

But, there are inherent dangers in any sport, geocaching and benchmarking included. I do think that there should be more warnings of the dangers on the page cited. It is rated for 4* for terrain and difficulty. People should be forewarned by that. People should accept the rish for what they do, and attempt to do. They are warned. We cannot protect everyone from every danger, modern legal concepts notwithstanding.

Is it any more dangerous than Lake of the Clouds Hut? Many people have died hiking in the Whites. It's a 5* Virtual for terrain. I've done that one. I ws forewarned, and prepared. Or, here's an interesting one: Dry Bridge. Read SplicingDan's post for May 11. Too dangerous? I'll claim 2nd or 3rd to find on that one, on a nice Sunday afternoon.

This one: Wheretogo?Vertigo?, I passed on. The warnings are very clear here. Pray for Daylight! should probably have warnings this strong. Yet, there are 32 finds on this cache! And 13 DNFs including mine from last September 11th.

Here's a fun one! Secaucus Panorama. 4.5* terrain in he Jersey Meadowlands no less! The nearby benchmark KV4115 was quarried away. Oh, well.

More fun places! I was obviously not prepared for the difficulty on this one: LY2556. I took the wrong trail out. :laughing: And I slid/bushwhacked down 200' or so of cliff to Echo Lake. 3.5* terrain on the nearby cache Old Glory Jr. - NJ Style. Hmm... No one has logged the cache since I was there. Poor TB!

And, remember, that I'm in New Jersey! We don't have any tough mounains here!

And I haven't mentioned the seventeen or so black bear that I've met, including the one I almost stepped on! Samantha Bear

Sorry if I've gotten longwinded. What I'm getting at is that we are responsible for our own actions. You put down your nickel and take your chances.

Link to post

Overrover - Congrats on a great find!

 

With as many benchmarks as we have found, we still get excited about finding one that others couldn't find.

 

What gets us the most excited is finding the 100+ years old marks, especially those drill holes from the late 1800's.

 

We have been doing this benchmark hunting for about 2 1/2 years now and the excitement is still there, whether it is a cairn, a drill hole or one we had to go back for 3 or 4 times before we found it.

 

Welcome to the fun.

 

As to whether to log it with the NGS or not, I suggest you start a thread in the NGS forum where you can get direct answers to specific questions.

 

Good hunting,

 

John

Link to post

Overrover,

 

Great find! There is nothing like the feeling of finding a mark that was previously reported as no found. Having the last reporting agency be one of the ones we refer to as "official" ones makes it even better.

 

The debate about whether to report or not report to NGS has been part of a number of threads here, and it simply comes down to personal preference and confidence. I would not continue in this hobby if I couldn't report my find to the NGS, as being part of something larger than myself is important to me. But it comes down to what you want to do. Nobody is forcing you to report.

 

If you do report, you really don't need to say anything special. You can simply report it as found. If you want to give more information, add that the railroad is abandoned and what park the bridge is located in. Also, you could add the location as you described it in your recovery--

about 2.5" north of the end of the top rail and touching the west edge of the west rail

 

Matt

Link to post
We have been doing this benchmark hunting for about 2 1/2 years now ....

It slipped right by me, but last month was the third anniversary of my first benchmark — DC VA BOUNDARY MK 6 RM 1 (HV7765) in Arlington, Virginia.

 

It's not apparent to me, but is there a way of identifying the first benchmark logged at Geocaching.com? And who gets the credit for that first find?

 

-ArtMan-

Link to post

Foxtrot,

 

Thanks for the rest of the story. It is true that a lot of bench Mark Base Lines were monumented along railroad lines, as in that time, as an infrastructure, it was the main way. Most of the major highways in the country had not been situated or developed yet.

 

Fast forward to today, and we have a very different world than we had in those simpler times. The railroads veiw people a lot differently and there are a lot more trains on arguably less tracks. Our aim is to try and nudge people in the direction of being safe. Even in the Survey Biz, we often overlook the railroad benchmarks anymore because it is literally an act of congress just to get permission to gain access, and then we have to be escorted by a rail employee with a radio for our safety. They have to enact slow orders where we are working... Depending on the scope of the work we may even have to be safety trained by the railroad so they certify we are aware of the dangers. You know, the whole deal, so they make it hard... I can't blame them as it adds cost to their operations too.

 

So for the most part, I caution people against even going there... It is just a lot of bother which isn't fun, especially when you are jacked up.

 

Stay Safe!

 

Rob

Edited by evenfall
Link to post

My favorite bm is MY3840 (Barrett Mt. 1871). It was on Barrett Mt. in a small field surrounded by a pine forest. The discription was vague stating it was on the highest part of the hill. With all of the trees there I could not distinguish the highest point so I decided to take a chance and strip a large pile or rocks. I dug around in the dirt under the pile and there it was. It was monumented in 1873 and not recorded since it was monumented. It was the last BM of a really good day of benchmarking.23725aa3-3521-4acd-aeea-2a9bd298fcf.jpg

Edited by ddnutzy
Link to post

Mine would have to be JV4592. Although BDT isn't certain I found the right mark, the day I hunted was beautiful, I met some very interesting people, and I think I found a mark from 1865. Read the recovery to see how my day went.

 

If you just want a pic, it is only a hole in a rock. 5c0b644b-f6ab-4b1f-bc7b-d78f7e6ce8d9.jpg

 

Another fav was KW2992, which was my first really old mark. It is cooler than a hole in a rock too, as it is a real granite monument. It was hard to find because it was a rainy day, the area was full of rocks, all of which looked they could have been the "pile of rocks" that were the reference marks, and there were leaves all over the place.

Link to post
My favorite bm is MY3840 (Barrett Mt. 1871). It was on Barrett Mt. in a small field surrounded by a pine forest. The discription was vague stating it was on the highest part of the hill. With all of the trees there I could not distinguish the highest point so I decided to take a chance and strip a large pile or rocks. I dug around in the dirt under the pile and there it was. It was monumented in 1873 and not recorded since it was monumented. It was the last BM of a really good day of benchmarking.

Now THAT is a cool find, just because of the date and the wonderfully.. er.. vague directions. :D

Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...