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The Most Caching Friendly State?


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It would be VERY hard to beat North Carolina (speaking as one who has only cached in four states).

 

There is every kind of cache for every kind of cacher - waterfronts, mountains, woods, cities, farms AND every kind of cache from ten gallon buckets to micro-micros. Yu can spend days on a multi or grab a quick lampost . . . caches are everywhere and no one wants to limit them in any way - it is great!

 

What's even more wonderful, there are people doing anything they can to encourage diversity, fun and growth of the game. NC people seem to want the game to grow and everyone to love it, and it is working.

 

Granpa Alex

Lovin' Carolina Cachin'

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It would be VERY hard to beat North Carolina (speaking as one who has only cached in four states).

 

There is every kind of cache for every kind of cacher - waterfronts, mountains, woods, cities, farms AND every kind of cache from ten gallon buckets to micro-micros. Yu can spend days on a multi or grab a quick lampost . . . caches are everywhere and no one wants to limit them in any way - it is great!

 

What's even more wonderful, there are people doing anything they can to  encourage diversity, fun and growth of the game. NC people seem to want the game to grow and everyone to love it, and it is working.

 

Granpa Alex

Lovin' Carolina Cachin'

Are you sure you don't live in Nevada?

Cause it sure sounds like the place your describing.

Except you don't mention how the Nevada State Parks system is behind geocaching or how the Nevada tourism board has a membership to geocaching.com and host their own cache.

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It would be VERY hard to beat North Carolina (speaking as one who has only cached in four states).

 

There is every kind of cache for every kind of cacher - waterfronts, mountains, woods, cities, farms AND every kind of cache from ten gallon buckets to micro-micros. Yu can spend days on a multi or grab a quick lampost . . . caches are everywhere and no one wants to limit them in any way - it is great!

 

What's even more wonderful, there are people doing anything they can to encourage diversity, fun and growth of the game. NC people seem to want the game to grow and everyone to love it, and it is working.

 

Granpa Alex

Lovin' Carolina Cachin'

I thought the thread was about official state policy towards geocaching. In that regard, the Nevada Tourism homepage is a picture that is worth a thousand words. States like West Virginia and Virginia, which also actively promote geocaching on their websites, could perhaps give Nevada a run for the money.

 

I don't dispute that North Carolina has nice geocaches and nice geocachers. But in terms of the topic for this thread, North Carolina is, in a word, abysmal. The official policy for geocaching in North Carolina State Parks provides, among other things, as follows:

  • The cache owner must pay a $35 fee for a permit to place a cache.
  • Virtual caches are encouraged over physical caches.
  • Log-only caches are encouraged over caches with trade items.
  • Cache pages must say that geocachers have to leave a note on their dashboard identifying them as a geocacher
  • The maximum allowed time period under the $35 permit is three months.

All things considered, I'd rather deal with the Nevada state officials. :blink:

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It would be VERY hard to beat North Carolina (speaking as one who has only cached in four states).

 

There is every kind of cache for every kind of cacher - waterfronts, mountains, woods, cities, farms AND every kind of cache from ten gallon buckets to micro-micros. Yu can spend days on a multi or grab a quick lampost . . . caches are everywhere and no one wants to limit them in any way - it is great!

 

What's even more wonderful, there are people doing anything they can to  encourage diversity, fun and growth of the game. NC people seem to want the game to grow and everyone to love it, and it is working.

 

Granpa Alex

Lovin' Carolina Cachin'

I thought the thread was about official state policy towards geocaching. In that regard, the Nevada Tourism homepage is a picture that is worth a thousand words. States like West Virginia and Virginia, which also actively promote geocaching on their websites, could perhaps give Nevada a run for the money.

 

I don't dispute that North Carolina has nice geocaches and nice geocachers. But in terms of the topic for this thread, North Carolina is, in a word, abysmal. The official policy for geocaching in North Carolina State Parks provides, among other things, as follows:

  • The cache owner must pay a $35 fee for a permit to place a cache.
  • Virtual caches are encouraged over physical caches.
  • Log-only caches are encouraged over caches with trade items.
  • Cache pages must say that geocachers have to leave a note on their dashboard identifying them as a geocacher
  • The maximum allowed time period under the $35 permit is three months.

All things considered, I'd rather deal with the Nevada state officials. :blink:

The wee rodent fancier has the long and short of it. I'd love to hear about other states with official agencies that encourage goecaching.

I'd also love to hear stories from the cachers that visit Reno, Las Vegas, and Tahoe every year. I know from my cache logs that people from every state in the US and all over the world visit them. Lets hear what you think about Nevada geocaching.

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I have 40 finds in Nevada, collected over two long weekend trips to Vegas. The first trip, in 2003, focused on the Strip and a trip to Red Rock Canyon. In May 2004, a group of us met up and spent two days caching our way to Hoover Dam and back, also stretching across the border for some finds in Arizona.

 

I always enjoyed Vegas before discovering geocaching, but I never left the Strip. It took geocaching to allow me to discover the desert's natural beauty. Before geocaching, I'd spend 12 hours per day playing blackjack, where now I will spend 12 hours or more outdoors.

 

Geocaching has also gotten me interested in off-roading, on a VERY amateur basis. From what I've read in the cache logs, Nevada offers some of the best off-road geocaching opportunities available anywhere.

 

Perhaps I'll plan my third caching trip to Nevada, and focus on getting outside of Vegas and seeing more of the state this time!

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To stick with the OP's other stated theme for this thread, I'd like to formally nominate my neighboring state to the south, West Virginia, as geocaching-friendly.

 

Take a look at the Geocaching Page on the West Virginia State Parks official website. They even list all the caches and provide links to them! And in several of the state parks, the staff has teamed up with area geocachers to hide officially sponsored caches.

 

If you are a traditional geocacher who likes the long hike in the woods type of cache, and you are annoyed by all the other types of caches cluttering your search results pages, take a trip to West Virginia. The state hasn't yet experienced the explosion in cache density found in many other places. A relatively small but dedicated group of geocachers concentrates on hiding quality caches that take you to beautiful places. I have barely scratched the surface of what the state has to offer to geocachers.

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I have 40 finds in Nevada, collected over two long weekend trips to Vegas. The first trip, in 2003, focused on the Strip and a trip to Red Rock Canyon. In May 2004, a group of us met up and spent two days caching our way to Hoover Dam and back, also stretching across the border for some finds in Arizona.

 

I always enjoyed Vegas before discovering geocaching, but I never left the Strip. It took geocaching to allow me to discover the desert's natural beauty. Before geocaching, I'd spend 12 hours per day playing blackjack, where now I will spend 12 hours or more outdoors.

 

Geocaching has also gotten me interested in off-roading, on a VERY amateur basis. From what I've read in the cache logs, Nevada offers some of the best off-road geocaching opportunities available anywhere.

 

Perhaps I'll plan my third caching trip to Nevada, and focus on getting outside of Vegas and seeing more of the state this time!

If you come to Reno I'll take you offroad caching.

Las Vegas is amazing I grew up there and it has only become more increadible over the years. Reno is special in a whole different way. Gaming and shows with kayaking just outside your hotel room? Trophy fly fishing minutes from the downtown? Lake Tahoe less than an hour away? The Black Rock desert, High Rock Canyon, Sand Mountain, all within easy driving distance. And all along the way caches.

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The official policy for geocaching in North Carolina State Parks provides, among other things, as follows:
  • The cache owner must pay a $35 fee for a permit to place a cache.
  • Virtual caches are encouraged over physical caches.
  • Log-only caches are encouraged over caches with trade items.
  • Cache pages must say that geocachers have to leave a note on their dashboard identifying them as a geocacher
  • The maximum allowed time period under the $35 permit is three months.

All things considered, I'd rather deal with the Nevada state officials. :blink:

$35 to place a cache for three months?

 

Is that $140 a year or do you have to remove it after three months?

 

What happens if you don't remove it? Do they send you an invoice for three more months? Do they fine you? Or do they just toss it?

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I'd have to agree with Lep, although I may be a bit biased. :blink:

 

I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

9b0a4bc7-4fbc-4d1c-9d57-c155e94fa910.jpg

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

While caching in the park, I met an out of state family caching for the first time with a rental unit (I'll not mention what brand, that's another thread) having a great time battling the deer flies, and when I took the picture, a pair of Baltimore ladies visiting the park, stopped and inquired about the activity as they noticed the sign too.

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I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

Hmm. I wonder if they have Jeremy's permission to use the logo and the website name to rent those GPS' to park visitors.

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I'd have to agree with Lep, although I may be a bit biased. :blink:

 

I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

<image snipped>

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

While caching in the park, I met an out of state family caching for the first time with a rental unit (I'll not mention what brand, that's another thread) having a great time battling the deer flies, and when I took the picture, a pair of Baltimore ladies visiting the park, stopped and inquired about the activity as they noticed the sign too.

Where is Canaan Valley State Park?

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I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

Hmm. I wonder if they have Jeremy's permission to use the logo and the website name to rent those GPS' to park visitors.

Hmm, I'm sure they can rent anything they want without permission :blink: , and if one would follow Lep's link, one would see that the logo and website name are prominently displayed there, too. I'm sure the free advertisement has permission, too.

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I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

Hmm. I wonder if they have Jeremy's permission to use the logo and the website name to rent those GPS' to park visitors.

Hmm, I'm sure they can rent anything they want without permission :blink: , and if one would follow Lep's link, one would see that the logo and website name are prominently displayed there, too. I'm sure the free advertisement has permission, too.

Hmm. Yeah. I'm not talking about permission to rent GPSr's.

 

I'm talking about permission to use a trademark that is not their own.

 

Sorry. I should have said that the first time.

 

(Oh...wait, I did!)

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I was caching/traveling to a family reunion and found this rather large sign near the entrance to Canaan Valley State Park.

 

There are a few caches in the park placed by the Park Rangers and by a few geocachers (with proper premission, of course).

 

Hmm. I wonder if they have Jeremy's permission to use the logo and the website name to rent those GPS' to park visitors.

Hmm, I'm sure they can rent anything they want without permission :blink: , and if one would follow Lep's link, one would see that the logo and website name are prominently displayed there, too. I'm sure the free advertisement has permission, too.

Hmm. Yeah. I'm not talking about permission to rent GPSr's.

 

I'm talking about permission to use a trademark that is not their own.

 

Sorry. I should have said that the first time.

 

(Oh...wait, I did!)

I know what was asked. I just thought it was an asinine question, is all.

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I went Geocaching in Las Vegas this year and last year and had a great time. I've been to Vegas many times on business and Geocaching got me to see things off the strip. I managed to rent a Jeep this year and drive along some of the dirt roads to the more remote caches. You can easily spend days in Red Rocks going after caches with terrains from 1 to 4 stars and all of the trail heads have paved parking areas so they are all car accesible.

 

My favorite cache is just outside of Vegas, Pioneer Saloon. A unique part of the local history and a great place to get a beer.

Edited by magellan315
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And you've gotta love a town like Beatty Nevada, that holds Geocache Shootouts during their Centennial! :blink:

 

81df40aa-387e-42f4-bdef-bba9bdb6b21f.jpg

That was one of the biggest geocaching events ever in the state. I can't remember the exact number but a whole slew of caches were placed for the event. There was even a geocaching poker run.

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I'd also love to hear stories from the cachers that visit Reno, Las Vegas, and Tahoe every year. I know from my cache logs that people from every state in the US and all over the world visit them. Lets hear what you think about Nevada geocaching.

/me raises his hand!

 

As a matter of fact, I'm sitting in my room at the Four Seasons right now, getting ready to load up my GPS.

 

I've already done most of the caches on the strip, and most of the caches in Red Rock Canyon (a MUST do!) on previous trips, but there are plenty of caches left to find in the area.

 

The Strip:

Just like everything else in Vegas, it's overwhelming. Many might be called "lame virtuals", but when you string them all together, spending most of the night walking from one to the other, the overall experience is a blast. Mix in a little gambling, shopping, and people-watching, and you can make a day of it.

 

Red Rock Canyon:

Breathtaking!!

There is something here for everyone. There are park-n-grabs. There are high terrain caches. There is everything in between. The best part is EVERY cache is surrounded by "WOW!". Awesome views like this at every cache:

 

6b72f687-a393-410b-a6d6-abfc969bc5a7.jpg

Edited by Mopar
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I'd also love to hear stories from the cachers that visit Reno, Las Vegas, and Tahoe every year. I know from my cache logs that people from every state in the US and all over the world visit them. Lets hear what you think about Nevada geocaching.

/me raises his hand!

 

As a matter of fact, I'm sitting in my room at the Four Seasons right now, getting ready to load up my GPS.

 

I've already done most of the caches on the strip, and most of the caches in Red Rock Canyon (a MUST do!) on previous trips, but there are plenty of caches left to find in the area.

 

The Strip:

Just like everything else in Vegas, it's overwhelming. Many might be called "lame virtuals", but when you string them all together, spending most of the night walking from one to the other, the overall experience is a blast. Mix in a little gambling, shopping, and people-watching, and you can make a day of it.

 

Red Rock Canyon:

Breathtaking!!

There is something here for everyone. There are park-n-grabs. There are high terrain caches. There is everything in between. The best part is EVERY cache is surrounded by "WOW!". Awesome views like this at every cache:

 

<image snipped>

I'd like to clarify, not every cache in Red Rock has a cutie standing around.

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I'd also love to hear stories from the cachers that visit Reno, Las Vegas, and Tahoe every year. I know from my cache logs that people from every state in the US and all over the world visit them. Lets hear what you think about Nevada geocaching.

I belong to an organization that has an annual conference in Las Vegas every Jaunary. This year was my first time attending, and we had a blast. Next year's is already on our calendar. Sin City? More like BIG TIME FUN City IMHO. :)

 

We only had one day to spend outside the conference dates so I didn't get to see as much of the surrounding area as I would have liked to.We'll plan better next year. Expect to be taken up on that off-road offer Rusty. :) We did rent a car for the drive out to Hoover Dam, and it was well worth it.

I do like a well done urban micro, and loved Wanna buy a Bridge?. I would have never found the gardens behind the Flamingo (at 1 AM) if the virtual wasn't there. Can't wait to come back.

 

PS: please don't beat up on NC too much. It's only our State Parks department that doesn't understand/approve of 'caching (which we're working on). We have a great bunch of county and muni park departments who are very supportive and involved.

 

But the Nevada stuff (and the others on this thread) just rocks! B)

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Nope ! Texas !    Of course, Houston (which is the big area, right of center, with the red checks in it.)

..... 1474 caches within 98 miles from my house !

4 of which are mine and 68 of which I have found..

Would this be called a "target rich environment"

This shows about 250 miles from home....

Sorry but this thread is about the state of the State's friendliness towards geocaching; not the state's cache density. :rolleyes:

This is not to be confused with the state of the state's cacher density, which as we all know goes to NJ for having the densest cachers! :anitongue:

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