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  1. Guest

    topomap accuracy?

    Your GPS is giving the correct position. The problem is that Geocaching.com uses the WGS84 datum (the current standard), while Topozone.com uses USGS maps that use the older NAD27 datum. This can lead to a positional difference of up to around 200 meters in some parts of the US. In order to plot the correct point on Topozone, you will have to convert the cache coordinates to the NAD27 datum and then tell Topozone (manually) to plot them. For more info on datums, see http://joe.mehaffey.com/maps.txt and http://www.alltopo.com/gps_accuracy.htm .
  2. e already intense use this small system supports. We have approximately 3.5 million visitors per year, which is more than visit Rocky Mountain National Park, and we have only one-eighth the acreage. We appreciation our local geocachers? respect and concern for the environment, as expressed through dialog on the web site, and would like to add our own to the conversation. Our primary concern is the increased off trail use that this activity generates. Assuming the goal of this sport is to use a GPS unit on a scavenger hunt, it seems unlikely that staying on trail would be the normal or desired mode of travel for geocachers. The park has 140 miles of official trails, and we estimate over 200 miles of social trails. This high volume of social trails indicates that visitors are penetrating core areas specifically intended to remain as undisrupted habitat. The topography, slope, soil types and vegetation on Open Space and Mountain Parks properties cannot sustain off-trail use. Off trail activities are causing extensive soil erosion. Trampled vegetation at trail edges tends to be replaced by weeds rather than native plants. We are concerned about damage to native plants such as Ute ladies?-tresses orchids, a federally listed species, as well as other sensitive plant species and communities. Fragmentation of wildlife habitat for animals, like the endangered Preble?s meadow jumping mice, gray fox and goshawk is likely. Disruptive intrusions into the breeding territory of the forest and grassland nesting birds, including peregrine falcons and golden eagles, is also a potential problem. Preserving core areas of unfragmented habitats is a major management goal. Habitat fragmentation affects animals negatively by eliminating vast tracts of uninterrupted space needed to sustain foraging, nesting, breeding and territory needs. Unofficial paths bisecting these habitats cause animals to spend unnecessary time defending their nests or territory from humans. This detracts from time normally spent feeding and caring for their offspring, which can result in the death of their young. Off trail travel results in a corridor of impact. A single person quietly hiking has much less impact than a pair or group, and significantly less impact than when a dog is present. The weaving nature of a dog?s normal travel dramatically broadens the corridor of impact, made worse if the dog is actively scouting for animals, following scent trails, digging and/or barking. Proposing an alternative use for this navigation/orienteering technique that directs the general public to local special natural history points, such as rare plant species or communities, elicits greater concerns. In an effort to balance the research and protection needs of these communities we use staff and volunteers to monitor them, but within a controlled framework. Explorations by larger numbers of people to these areas would probably prove very detrimental to their health. Management policies aim at protection of the lands while providing for appropriate recreational activities. Consequently, our policy includes discouraging off trail use and any activities that involve taking anything from the park or leaving property in the park. Our wildlife closures specifically prohibit human incursions into protected areas. Activities that damage property or can be perceived of as littering or construction of structures are not allowed. Our preference would be to see the geocaching activities happening on lands that are less vulnerable than the Open Space and Mountain Parks properties. The basic premises of the "Leave No Trace Policy" are critical to the protection of these lands: stay on trails, leave it as you found it, carry out your trash, manage your dog, pick up after your pet, and share the trail with other users. (For more specifics on "Leave No Trace", visit the web site www.ci.boulder.co.us/openspace/lnt/lntonos.htm.) Our regulations can be found at www.ci.boulder.co.us/openspace/rules.htm. Thank you for taking the time to read about our concerns. Feel free to visit our web site at www.ci.boulder.co.us/openspace or contact us at sutherlandd@ci.boulder.co.us or by phone at (303) 441-3440.
  3. Guest

    Map Datums

    Why doesn't this site use UTM coordinates as a standard? UTM coordinates are much more intuitive and is the datum used on USGS maps. Why use degrees, minutes, and seconds when coordinates can be logged in meters? If people are not familiar with the UTM system it would be well worth the short time to learn it. For exanple: If I am standing at 15S 0369238/3923896 and my objective is 15S 0369238/3923696 then I know that my objective is 200 meters south of my current position just by subtracting the coodinates.
  4. Guest

    eTrex Vista ship date

    I have been swapping e-mails back and forth with Kim from http://www.advancedgps.com/ and she says that 100 vista's are going out tomorrow, and another 200 are expected to be sent out thursaday or friday (this is shipping to customer not shipping to advanced from Garmin.) I have checked many sites for GPS units and pricing and she seems to have one of the best with the offer of no shipping costs. She has also been very helpful and at the time I was e-mailing with her she did not know of "Geocaching" until I mentioned it, she now intends on taking the family out for a go at the sport. If any of you guys are new to this sport and are thinking about buying a GPS unit, be sure to check that site out. I know of many people from this board that have bought theres from here as well as I have too! ------------------ Quinn Stone Rochester, NY.14616 www.Navicache.com [This message has been edited by Quinnow (edited 04-03-2001).]
  5. Guest

    What kind of Batteries?

    The ones I was looking at says they can be recharged about 500 times, but what I am wondering is what the heck is NiMH? is that nick cads? also can they be used in the unit I mentioned and at what battery setting? I would like to take a look at the ones you are using, is there a site that shows those? quote:Originally posted by wjoos123:I'm using ACCUCELL's you can get them in all sizes, they have (for AA batteries) 1800mAh !!! and a low discharge current, and better performance in cold conditions. Accucells combine NiMH and Alkaline batteries. They are rechargeable (about 200 time)!!! ------------------ Quinn Stone Rochester, NY.14616 www.Navicache.com
  6. Guest

    What kind of Batteries?

    I'm using ACCUCELL's you can get them in all sizes, they have (for AA batteries) 1800mAh !!! and a low discharge current, and better performance in cold conditions. Accucells combine NiMH and Alkaline batteries. They are rechargeable (about 200 time)!!!
  7. Guest

    Cachers Vs. Cache Seekers

    Wow those prices are way high. I use quality .50cal ammo cans that i get for 3.50 each. I buy very nice toys for kids like yo-yo's and crayons for 1.00 each at the "dollar store", you can also get a great logbook there for the same price. The camera is about 8-10 like you said, but all in all you can make an excellant cache for around 20.00 total. I still have noticed that tons of people are going out and bragging that they found 5 caches in a single day, some have over 30 caches under their belts, yet have hidden less than 3 if any at all. I put hours into thinking about where I will hide one, as well as the money put into making it and the cost of gas to take it out and place it. So for me to do all this for someone else to enjoy and give nothing back in return is kind of upsetting to me. So for those of you that have run out into the field and cache hunted all day to return and brag about your finds, please remember that if it wasn't for us making them your GPS would still be on that shelf collecting dust. If you're not going to place any then don't go look for any either. I understand that there are those few instances where maybe a geocacher is not able to get out and place one, like maybe health reasons or age, but for those of you that are racking over 5 finds and haven't placed one yet you need to stop where you are and start helping the cause of placing one in a nice location...my two cents! quote:Originally posted by daviskw:Hmmm I guess I could be considered a slacker by the standards here. I have 31 finds and have placed 5. But there is something you people are forgetting, not everyone here is rich. I'm not poor mouthing but on each cache I spent: $6.00 container $8.50 camera $25 of gifts $3.00 logbook $2.00 for 2 pens and 3 pencils and sharpener. 1.00 for baggies and such. Add a few bucks for box decorations and gas to get there and it is around $50 per cache. That is $200 bucks in a couple of months that I found the 31 caches. That's about all I can afford. I'm not complaining, I like having nice cashes for people to find and enjoy and I'm not worried about counting who does what. Butch ------------------ Quinn Stone Rochester, NY.14616 www.Navicache.com [This message has been edited by Quinnow (edited 03-29-2001).]
  8. Guest

    Commercial TOPO! software

    I have one of the TOPO! sets for SFBay, Napa and BigSur (2 disks total). It was $50. There are about 8 sections of the state available at that rate, or the whole state for $200. I just saw on the discussion list the following web site which apparently has the entire state at $150. www.4x4books.com I really like the series...haven't seen Delorme, but have read some dissatifaction with it.
  9. Guest

    WGS 84 Datum??

    The default setting for map datum is WGS 84. People have reported problems when trying to line up there coordinates with a topo map, like the ones used on topozone. Their map datum is NAD 27. There can put you off by 200 feet or more. The Cache position listed is WGS 84 but when you look up the position on topozone it will be incorrect if you don't convert it to NAD 27. Hope this helps.
  10. Guest

    Cachers Vs. Cache Seekers

    Hmmm I guess I could be considered a slacker by the standards here. I have 31 finds and have placed 5. But there is something you people are forgetting, not everyone here is rich. I'm not poor mouthing but on each cache I spent: $6.00 container $8.50 camera $25 of gifts $3.00 logbook $2.00 for 2 pens and 3 pencils and sharpener. 1.00 for baggies and such. Add a few bucks for box decorations and gas to get there and it is around $50 per cache. That is $200 bucks in a couple of months that I found the 31 caches. That's about all I can afford. I'm not complaining, I like having nice cashes for people to find and enjoy and I'm not worried about counting who does what. Butch
  11. Guest

    GPS Unit horizontal accuracy

    Can some of you experienced GPS unit users give me some idea as to the horizontal accuracy of the hand held units being used by geocachers. Is there a difference in accuracy between the $200 units and the $500 units or do the more expensive just have more features? I have used backpack models with the pole antennae and found them to be very accurate. I would guess, the handheld units are somewhat less accurate. Thanks
  12. Guest

    Magellan or Garmin

    quote:Originally posted by bpuetz:I have an eTrex Vista on order, priamrily because of the memory and the altimeter. However, can someone explain the relevant differences between it and the Map76, other than the compass and altimeter? For example, the Map76 says it comes loaded with worldwide cities > 200,000 population. What exactly does that mean? Is that just major streets? I don't think it's any streets - just locations of the cities (although it does also have a basemap with major streets/highways for the Americas). The Map76 is more optimized for marine applications so it comes with a database that includes detailed coastlines and navigational aids (buoys, lighhouses, etc.) in addition to the cities. It also has an audible alarm for conditions like dragging your anchor or proximity to a wreck or reef in addition to the more common functions - turn coming up, batteries low, etc. Unlike the eTrex series, it has a jack for an external antenna so you can use it below decks or in cars that have metallic coatings in the windows - the ext. antenna can also be useful for hiking under dense foliage cover. Finally, it's physically larger which is not so good for hiking, but does give it a larger screen and enough volume so it floats if you drop it overboard (the Magellan 315/330 float too). [This message has been edited by peter (edited 03-23-2001).]
  13. Guest

    Magellan or Garmin

    I have an eTrex Vista on order, priamrily because of the memory and the altimeter. However, can someone explain the relevant differences between it and the Map76, other than the compass and altimeter? For example, the Map76 says it comes loaded with worldwide cities > 200,000 population. What exactly does that mean? Is that just major streets?
  14. Guest

    Geocaching Demographics

    51, male, active; cyclist (200-300k brevets, slow but plenty of endurance), hiker, x-c skier, snowshoer, canoeist, orienteering. Married, 2 kids. My 12 year old is looking forward to cache hunting with me this spring.
  15. Guest

    GPS Unit horizontal accuracy

    In general, you can expect about 15 meter (49 feet) RMS, which in English means that you can assume that the GPS is correct to within 15 meters 63% of the time (experts, correct me if I'm wrong here). Of course, the position of the satellites in the sky, signal reflection, and signal blockage can all affect this accuracy. With DGPS (differential GPS) you can get within 1-5 meters RMS. All of the consumer units priced between $200 and $500 will give you essentially the same accuracy (although as WAAS continues to get implemented, you will see those that are WAAS enabled start to distance themselves from the others in accuracy). As you surmised, the price differences generally involve the number of extra features. The backpack models you have used and commercial-grade receivers are significantly more expensive, and cost well over $1000.
  16. Guest

    GPS Recommendations?

    I'm sure this is the most common question asked here, but gimme a break I just learned of this sport today (through an article in The Baltimore Sun). It sounds like alot of fun and I'd like to take it up, but obviouslly I need a GPS. So please, if you could, recommend a good GPS for me. Here's a couple of specs I've nailed down: -Lightweight, preferably pocket size -around $200 (U.S.) -waterproof (one that floats would be nice) -map display If you don't feel like writing a review, any good websites would also be appreciated. Thanks, in advance, for your help. -See you in the log book.
  17. Guest

    Finding a grave?

    Mount10bike...I think we just created another sport...the tough part would be digging up the logbook though. But this would be cool for those people that like to scribe(copy) gravestones. We have a cemetary here that is about 2 miles squared and over 200 years old. People use it for the paved trails to bike, jog and walk through all day long. could be a good spot for one of those altoid caches, maybe put it on "jack the rippers" gravesite and log the location...after all, I dont think he'd complain! ------------------ Quinn Stone Rochester, NY.14616 www.Navicache.com [This message has been edited by Quinnow (edited 03-20-2001).]
  18. Guest

    Your most challenging Cache?

    The most challenging one I've hit so far was the "Blackrock Basin" cache in the Shenandoah NP. We gave up after about 3 hours. It's somewhere on a talus slope about 200 feet high and 100 yards wide. The rocks range from the size of pebbles to the size of VW Beetles, and there are literally MILLIONS of small cracks, crevices, gaps, and holes where it COULD be. We never found the one where it WAS... Scott
  19. Guest

    Your most challenging Cache?

    The most challenging one I've hit so far was the "Blackrock Basin" cache in the Shenandoah NP. We gave up after about 3 hours. It's somewhere on a talus slope about 200 feet high and 100 yards wide. The rocks range from the size of pebbles to the size of VW Beetles, and there are literally MILLIONS of small cracks, crevices, gaps, and holes where it COULD be. We never found the one where it WAS... Scott
  20. ... moving map? I'm wondering, from a potential future recreational pilot's point of view... I kind of like the eTrex, at under $200 canadian, but I don't think it has moving map, does it? I was also thinking of the Garmin GPS12, which, from what I could tell, does have moving map. looking for opinions and the like... Glenoled
  21. Guest

    Cache creation tips...

    the mountains, looking _specifically_ for an area that was A) off-the-beaten-path, and had good SATELLITE VISIBILITY.. (this incldes tree canopy) Figuring that since the game was created around the GPS system, and typical GPS receivers need a clear view of the sky (not withstanding active antennas and such) for _reliable_ position fixes, I kept out of thick forests... I tried to find open meadows, etc. where I could get 6 or 8 sats with good strenth, and a DOP under 1.5... My opinion was further reinforced while on one hunt in Oregon, when I decided to "just take the Etrex, it's all we'll need", into a thick douglas fir forest, and was only able to get a consistent position fix every 100 meters or so, if I sat still under a small opening in the canopy for awhile to let teh GPS work.. We eventually found the cache, but only by chance, and two people 200 feet apart scrambling around looking under every log and behind every stump... This doesn't necessarily worry me for myself, because I have found the Etrex to be sub-optimal in those type conditions, and I have another unit that works fine under that kind of canopy.. but ALOT of people are using the inexpensive Etrex and such... I have always considered the fact that even with SA off, under ideal conditions (say, DOP right around 1.0) we have reliable 10 meter accuracy.. Under LESS than ideal conditions, like under trees, in valleys, etc. when ya see your DOP shoot up to 2 or 3 or more, thats 20 or 30 meters or more... Therefore, my idea was to find locations where you could get good geometry, and good reception.. the theoretical 10 meter accuracy.. and THEN, place the cache so it would be visible once you were within 10 meters... This is obviously unrealistic, but it is a good theory to start from... Anyhow, just thought I'd share those tidbits, if anyone cares
  22. Guest

    Cache creation tips...

    the mountains, looking _specifically_ for an area that was A) off-the-beaten-path, and had good SATELLITE VISIBILITY.. (this incldes tree canopy) Figuring that since the game was created around the GPS system, and typical GPS receivers need a clear view of the sky (not withstanding active antennas and such) for _reliable_ position fixes, I kept out of thick forests... I tried to find open meadows, etc. where I could get 6 or 8 sats with good strenth, and a DOP under 1.5... My opinion was further reinforced while on one hunt in Oregon, when I decided to "just take the Etrex, it's all we'll need", into a thick douglas fir forest, and was only able to get a consistent position fix every 100 meters or so, if I sat still under a small opening in the canopy for awhile to let teh GPS work.. We eventually found the cache, but only by chance, and two people 200 feet apart scrambling around looking under every log and behind every stump... This doesn't necessarily worry me for myself, because I have found the Etrex to be sub-optimal in those type conditions, and I have another unit that works fine under that kind of canopy.. but ALOT of people are using the inexpensive Etrex and such... I have always considered the fact that even with SA off, under ideal conditions (say, DOP right around 1.0) we have reliable 10 meter accuracy.. Under LESS than ideal conditions, like under trees, in valleys, etc. when ya see your DOP shoot up to 2 or 3 or more, thats 20 or 30 meters or more... Therefore, my idea was to find locations where you could get good geometry, and good reception.. the theoretical 10 meter accuracy.. and THEN, place the cache so it would be visible once you were within 10 meters... This is obviously unrealistic, but it is a good theory to start from... Anyhow, just thought I'd share those tidbits, if anyone cares
  23. Guest

    What model GPS is everyone using?

    Just used a globalmap 100. Beautiful map. It aquired fast enuf for me. Can be had for 200$US anywhere
  24. Guest

    Erosion and you?

    I work in a 2,200 acre park 14 miles from Boston. We had a huge snowstorm the last couple of days and I was lucky enough to do a little snowshoeing this morning, it is absolutely beautiful out today. I hiked up to a little rock dome that allows for a view of downtown. A filthy brown haze hung over the city on what was a perfectly clear blue sky day. So anyhow this is my point; if people weren't stomping around in these woods (yes crushing plants and compacting soil) 120 years ago this would all now be houses and the filthy haze would be here too. Hello Cape Cod! [This message has been edited by lynnwoods (edited 03-08-2001).]
  25. Guest

    delorme tripmate

    I have a 5 year old (very old in GPS years) tripmate made by DeLorme tied to a Street Atlas 4.0 mapping software. I put it into a 75 mhz lap top and put it into my truck.( somebody told me I had turned a $2,000 lap top into a $200.00 GPS unit, but the lap top was just sitting around gathering dust anyway) After working out some bugs (believe it or not, Y2K struck)(you have to change the date year to 99, instead of 01 and when it actually sees the satellites, then the date auto updates) I got the thing working, and working well. I found my first cache this morning and the GPC receiver was within 10 feet of the cache location. In the monitor GPS configuration, it gives 4 significant digits after the decimal, which translates to about 4 feet by my observation. I don't know how many averages it uses (the technical specifications are not in the instructions), but I have noticed that it settles down after about 30 seconds. I am very pleased with this units performance today. I would be glad to help anyone who is having trouble getting this unit to work. Bob
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