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WildcatRegi

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Everything posted by WildcatRegi

  1. Thanks guys, I checked out the explorist and it just might work!
  2. OK, I've been looking around for quite a while and reading a lot of unit manuals but I haven't found anything that can handle this need. For those who have used scanning radios, some models can store groups of frequencies in 'banks' and then you can control which group is being scanned and the others are ignored. I'd like to do the same thing with waypoints. My application is simply having up to 12-14 groups of waypoints for a given area and I'd like to specify which group is currently being used. Actual use: I have waypoints for various points in time for battlefields. I'd like for example 8am to be shown on my display but the rest of the times ignored because the display would be just too outrageous and the total number of waypoints being active would be too much for most gps units. Without downloading different groups using a laptop pc, I just don't know how to accomplish this function. I'd much rather have all the waypoints stored but then select which group is active. Any ideas?
  3. I've written a software package that provides waypoints for Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Spotsylvania, and the Wilderness. Take a look at the PowerPoint presentation at Introduction to Battle Points I'm still trying to decide how (or if) to market this package. I guess a lot of it depends on how interested people are.
  4. I'm looking for a piece of software, such as USAPhotoMap which would enable me to use csv files with my waypoints and 'click and drag' a waypoint to a new location and have the coordinates be updated. USAPhotoMap is a great tool to view waypoints and it has tools to calculate new coordinates, but I sure would like to 'click and drag' in order to update waypoints! Any suggestions would be appreciated.
  5. I can't seem to find exactly what I'm looking for, some software might be usable but I'd like the opinions of some of you experts. I have a spreadsheet that I'm creating with many waypoints. I have unique names for the waypoints and their corresponding lat/long, but I can't figure out the most convienient way to create a file in a standard format, e. g. loc or gpx. Has anyone figured out which software could handle an Excel spreadsheet or a csv with waypoint/lat/long columns? I sure could use a way to do this, I just can't handle keying in many waypoint entries! (I'm mathmatically calculating waypoints and I'd like to be able to download them to my gps.) Any help at all would be appreciated. Thanks.
  6. hey! all you photoshop people, where's a picture of a squirrel chocking on an ammo box? ps just did a google search on vonbluvens, anyone who would use this as his screen name must be a sick individual, I'm glad he's banned, and I hope he gets some serious help!
  7. I have one and can't recommend it. It is accurate though, I've tested it at a surveyed point and it was right on! The only problem with it is how long it takes to get a lock and all too often it will time out and not get a lock at all. There's no comparison between my GPS Casio and my eTrex Legend. I was really disappointed, I wanted the convience of a watch with my photography so that I could be getting the coordinates while I was taking a picture. If anyone knows how to override the timeouts and if there's any software out there to more quickly get a lock on the satellites, I sure would like to know.
  8. Just found these Otter boxes, looks like they'd be good for those level-5 caches. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  9. Here's something I just did last weekend and I'll be trying it out next week at a national battlefield site in Virginia. Most national battlefield sites will sell maps showing the positions of the units at different time periods. In the case of Chancellorsville, there were 12 different maps. I made a transperancy with alignment marks at specific road junctures. By placing this transparency on each map, I was able to come up with one document showing each individual position of the unit I was interested in (my gggrandfather's). I used Topozone to find the coordinates of the road junctures I used as reference points. Using the scale of the map to find the distance, a protractor to find the bearing, and the Excel add-ins that you can download from the Marine Mammal site, I came up with all the waypoints I need in order to trace the path of my gggrandfather's unit. It seems to me this is an interesting technique to plan a meaningful field trip, combining research, a little geometry, a little map reading, and a little foot-work. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  10. you tech-savy, goggling experts probably already know this, but I just found a governmental site that has Excel add-in functions available for download. These addins do all kinds of geometric functions such as distance and bearing calculations and are very easily used in Excel.... go to Excel Add-ins "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  11. I received that Cambridge comment today as well. It occurred to me however, that you need to know how to spell correctly in order to read these misspellings. If you didn't know how to spell, your brain couldn't put the letters together into a word for you. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  12. I have a micro that was an Altoids tin that has lasted a year. It was painted flat black with RustOleum, however, I did make a mistake by not painting the inside as well. There's a little rust forming on the inside so I'm replacing it this weekend but it has held up quite well - plastic bag inside of course. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  13. blah blah blah "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  14. Interesting monologue, I would have just said, "Sorry, I screwed up." "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  15. WildcatRegi

    AT on GPS

    Here's all the official GPS information about the AT: AT GPS Stuff You can download this information in most standard formats - you'll see the links. Good luck. - Be sure to download the coordinates of the shelter areas. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  16. Considering my Casio Pathfinder gps watch is very tempermental, I really have to wonder if a gps watch with cell phone is really workable. Sounds good on paper, probably wouldn't work in real life. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  17. Hydroshok - I'm shocked! You said quote: Let's take this a step further. What if a bumper sticker that said "Kill Whitey" or a Confederate Flag key chain was left in a cache, would someone feel that these racial items should be removed? First off, the Confederate flag IS NOT a racist symbol - if you think it is, then you have to think crosses are also! I know it doesn't matter what is true, only what people believe is true but the Confederate flag to most Southerners is a symbol of their heritage, not racism. It's just a dang shame they weren't more vocal in stopping the flag from being hijacked for a racist cause! "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  18. quote: I don't understand why, if knowing that there are so many who object to religious materials being left in caches that some *still* insist that it's OK to do so. I'm of the "if you don't like it, just ignore it crowd. I don't feel offended if I find some religious material and I don't feel threatened. The above comment overlooks one important fact though, IMHO, these forums do not represent 'most' geocachers - I'd be surprised if they represented so much as 1%. Does anyone know? "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  19. The Cabelas in Dundee, Michigan has a cache nearby: Dundee Notice the GPS reference post picture... "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  20. By the way, I think I saw a commericial for the new TV series, I believe on the History Channel, called "Tactical to Practical". I believe tonight's show is about GPS units. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  21. I only have one virtual and all I look for are answers to specific questions being emailed to me at the same time they log their find. I don't feel a need for them to wait until I give them permission before they log the find but I do check to make sure I've received an email from anyone who has logged a find online. If I don't get an answer, I'll email them directly and wait a few days. If I still don't get the answers, I delete the find, thankfully, I've only had to delete one entry. Did the 'finder' not remember the answers or were they caught claiming a false virtual - who knows? "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  22. You know, as a little side note I have a confession to make. All of these 'discussions' about where caches are allowed or not allowed, getting approval or not getting approval, too close to this or too close to that, the wilderness must be kept pure so no one should be here, etc., has caused me to be Very reluctant to place a new cache. I've had an ammo box with the sticker on the outside and stuffed with initial goodies in the back of my truck now for probably 4 months. I just haven't had the will (read gonads) to place it because each time I find an interesting area during my travels I wonder, 'who the heck would I need to get permission from for this' or 'am I going to be flamed by this group or that group, or whatever. I'm talking about areas that I know currently don't have a cache so at least I'm not worried about the .1 mile rule. I'm also quite aware of private property restrictions. I know you shouldn't have a vacation cache but I don't want to have to take a couple of hours out of my weekend on someone else's whim either. Has anyone else passed up on a area because it's just not clear who you'd have to ask (read kiss) to get a cache location approved? It's a dang shame that we can't just use our common sense and now we feel like we have to get some bureaucrat's permission in order to take a walk! "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  23. Hey - sounds like a good idea to me! "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  24. I really like the Gollum character, but then again, I am a Peter Lorrie fan. "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"
  25. Zen cachers said: quote: If anyone wants to see a great movie that deals with these sorts of things, watch "Bowling for Columbine". It shows that guns in America is the problem... guns aren't really a problem anywhere else. Just as many people have guns in Canada... but their level of gun violence is practically zero compared to ours. I think our government could learn a thing of two from other countries. I don't even want to get into the discussion about the movie - that's a long thread in itself but I don't understand your comment. If a thing is a problem somewhere but the same thing is not a problem somewhere else, then the thing itself must not be the real problem. If Canada has just as many guns with practically zero problems, then guns are not problems. Also, how I usually end any disagreement about firearms is a simple "we disagree". Thankfully, it's our constitutional right to keep and bear firearms, not as some would believe, just to go hunting. ps (I forgot to mention that I doubt that I would ever cache where my hiking stick wasn't enough protection.) "The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!" [This message was edited by WildcatRegi on September 02, 2003 at 03:50 AM.]
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