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JAR

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Everything posted by JAR

  1. I'm on my way. Thank you all for your suggestions. I only wish I could have enough time to get to them all! Oh well, good excuse for the next trip I guess...
  2. Greetings Northwest cachers, I will be flying to Portland shortly. I'm planning to spend a few days in the Portland area, then drive to Seattle where I will stay for another few days. I will have a car available for the entire trip. There are so many caches in this region, I'm looking for a few suggestions for caches that meet the following criteria: 1) Close enough to a road that I'll be "in the zone" within a short time -- immediately to 30 or 40 minutes hiking. I'd love to do some half- or full-day hikes, but time -- and the patience of family -- won't permit. (Nor will I be bringing the kind of gear I'd carry for a long hike.) 2) Caches of above-average quality or interest -- you be the judge. 3) I'd prefer conventional caches to virtuals, although especially good virtuals are certainly possible. In short, I'm asking for recommendations about your favorite caches... The "insider's guide" for the limited time I'll have available. I'll be bringing a TB from Connecticut that has an appointment in Seattle, and I've been asked by the owners to stash him there. I would be happy to give a bug or three a trip cross-country if anyone has any requests. Thank you all in advance for your help, and I'm looking forward to caching in beautiful Oregon and Washington!
  3. Let's recap: 1. The rules say not to do it. 2. The consensus of opinion in this thread is not to do it. 3. The underlying logic why not to do it is clear. The original poster asked a legitimate question, and I think this thread has provided a clear answer (if you place a cache, you are responsible to maintain, move, or remove it as necessary) and also offered a reasonable alternative (create a virtual if it's too far away to properly maintain a traditional cache). As to the (increasingly common) case of someone saying "I'll do whatever I want and the rest of you can go to Hell," why even bother posting if you don't care about the rules, logic, or the opinions of fellow cachers?
  4. I also support choosing a channel with GMRS overlap. Once upon a time, GMRS was primarily a business-based service. No more. The FCC has expressly designated GMRS for personal use: quote:The GMRS is a land mobile radio service available to persons for short-distance two-way communications to facilitate the activities of licensees and their immediate family members. (47 CFR 95 Subpart A, aka FCC Part 95.1) In fact, "non-individuals" (e.g., businesses) are no longer allowed to obtain GMRS licenses. The FCC has also dropped the license fee (now $75 for a 5-year term). It seems clear that their intent is to make GMRS a "super-FRS." That being the case, agreeing on one of the overlapping channels adds flexibility for geocachers who may decide to pay the $75 to increase their range without obsoleting their existing FRS radios. Channel 6 is fine by me.
  5. BrianSnat, If the scratch isn't too deep and you want to try to fix it yourself, have a look at Novus Plastic Polish. A quick search will reveal many dealers who sell it online, and it's also stocked in many plastic shops if you have one in your vicinity. I've used it on quite a few different items (although never a GPSr screen) with good results. Of course this is no substitute for a replacement from Garmin, but you always have that as an option anyway.
  6. [This message was edited by JAR on August 08, 2002 at 06:58 AM.]
  7. [This message was edited by JAR on August 08, 2002 at 06:56 AM.]
  8. I agree that this is annoying, but I'm not surprised. I have seen all kinds of electronic devices sent in for service -- computers, PDAs, pagers, video gear, etc. -- and almost all of them returned with a brain wipe. I recently had a problem with my cell phone/Palm (Kyocera QCP-6035, which has performed outstandingly over the last 18 months) which necessitated a visit to the store where I bought it. After listening to my description of the problem, the very first thing the technician did, before even touching my phone, was to ask if I'd backed up my data. Since I'm the guy who thinks living dangerously is keeping all your backups on the same coast, I replied in the affirmative. The tech promptly performed a hard reset which erases all user info from the device. (I could have told him that I had already tried that, but I knew he'd want to do it himself anyhow.) So, while I don't know what Garmin's specific motivation was, don't be too shocked that your eTrex came back with amnesia. As to the update: You mean that Garmin released a new update on the same day that your unit was delivered into your hands? Then that update wasn't posted as of the date your Venture was shipped to you. I hope you don't think that the technician who worked on your unit had any prior knowledge that a new version was imminent, much less had access to it ahead of the public. It's highly unlikely that the bit jockeys... er, software engineers who wrote and tested the updated code would have had any communication with the guys who swing the soldering irons doing repairs. Or knew that they existed. Or would ever have imagined communicating with them. And that's even assuming that the repair work is actually done on Garmin's premises by Garmin employees; many companies subcontract out their repair operations. So curse a blue streak and loudly decry the ineptitude of Garmin's service; it will make you feel better! But I don't think you've actually been treated poorly. I'm much more interested in knowing how long the repair took and whether they fixed the problem you sent it in for. Have you ever taken your car in for service and discovered when you got it back that all your radio station presets were erased? Now that one really frosts me...
  9. Criminal, The 3" CD-Rs are readily available from all the usual sources. Use "mini cd-r price" as the search argument in Google and you'll find dozens of places to buy them. That being said, I avoid them like the plague. They work fine in tray-loading drives, but they choke most slot-loading drives. I had to disassemble one recently for a friend who put a 3" CD into his drive and then couldn't get it to read or eject. Bummer.
  10. "What we've got here is a failure to communicate." quote:I feel that the level of Logical-Mathematical, Spatial, and Bodily-Kinesthetic problem solving skills required to find the cache rank the cache above a 1. (Boldface is mine.) But the cache isn't at all hard to find. By your own description it's sitting right out in the open. This thread raises an interesting question. If the "Difficulty" rating applied to reaching the cache, you'd certainly be correct. From what I've seen, most cachers have decided that the Difficulty/Terrain ratings translate into "How hard is it once you're there/How hard is it to get there." Granted, nowhere (that I could find) is that precise interpretation spelled out. I don't know if that was Jeremy's intent, and different cache hiders do seem to interpret them differently. Perhaps the titles "Difficulty" and "Terrain" are ambiguous. But that's the common usage, as reflected in ClayJar's rating page and the comments of other cachers above. (Yes, I know, by that interpretation it would make more sense if the numbers were reversed; but like many aspects of geocaching, the original concepts have been stretched and adapted as the popularity of geocaching has grown.) By this "common law" standard, your cache is a major challenge to reach (climbing the peak) but dead easy once you arrive. Nobody is doubting the physical and mental effort required to reach the cache. (Although niskibum has a point. Why not just chopper up?) I also meant to comment on one of your other points: quote:I didn’t want to post the coordinates b/c I wouldn’t want anyone who just downloaded waypoints to try and bushwhach there way up there and get stuck. As far as I'm concerned that's strictly a case of caveat emptor. Sure, some cachers just download a bunch of waypoints without reading the cache descriptions or plotting the coordinates on a map. Occasionally they might bite off more than they can chew. And lastly the reflector-at-night idea. I deserve no credit for that one, it's been used on several caches such as After Dark. If you search you'll find several threads about caching at night and caches designed to be hunted at night. Sometimes the darkness serves a different purpose. There are an amazing number of creative people out there hiding caches. The more cache descriptions I read (often from comments in forums), the more I'm surprised and intrigued by the clever things people have done.
  11. "What we've got here is a failure to communicate." quote:I feel that the level of Logical-Mathematical, Spatial, and Bodily-Kinesthetic problem solving skills required to find the cache rank the cache above a 1. (Boldface is mine.) But the cache isn't at all hard to find. By your own description it's sitting right out in the open. This thread raises an interesting question. If the "Difficulty" rating applied to reaching the cache, you'd certainly be correct. From what I've seen, most cachers have decided that the Difficulty/Terrain ratings translate into "How hard is it once you're there/How hard is it to get there." Granted, nowhere (that I could find) is that precise interpretation spelled out. I don't know if that was Jeremy's intent, and different cache hiders do seem to interpret them differently. Perhaps the titles "Difficulty" and "Terrain" are ambiguous. But that's the common usage, as reflected in ClayJar's rating page and the comments of other cachers above. (Yes, I know, by that interpretation it would make more sense if the numbers were reversed; but like many aspects of geocaching, the original concepts have been stretched and adapted as the popularity of geocaching has grown.) By this "common law" standard, your cache is a major challenge to reach (climbing the peak) but dead easy once you arrive. Nobody is doubting the physical and mental effort required to reach the cache. (Although niskibum has a point. Why not just chopper up?) I also meant to comment on one of your other points: quote:I didn’t want to post the coordinates b/c I wouldn’t want anyone who just downloaded waypoints to try and bushwhach there way up there and get stuck. As far as I'm concerned that's strictly a case of caveat emptor. Sure, some cachers just download a bunch of waypoints without reading the cache descriptions or plotting the coordinates on a map. Occasionally they might bite off more than they can chew. And lastly the reflector-at-night idea. I deserve no credit for that one, it's been used on several caches such as After Dark. If you search you'll find several threads about caching at night and caches designed to be hunted at night. Sometimes the darkness serves a different purpose. There are an amazing number of creative people out there hiding caches. The more cache descriptions I read (often from comments in forums), the more I'm surprised and intrigued by the clever things people have done.
  12. ifranz, I'm not trying to rain on your parade. You worked hard to achieve something difficult, and I understand your enthusiasm. Congrats on the climb, and I hope each one in the future brings you as much pleasure and feeling of accomplishment. Now let's try a little thought experiment. Imagine you have just reached the top of the south peak as you describe on the cache page...and you discover the following: The ammo box is welded to the top of a 3-meter metal pole embedded in the rock. The pole is completely smooth, about 8cm in diameter. When you get up to the box, you discover that it is sealed with a combination lock. There are four clues to help you determine the combination. These clues are all readily accessible from the cache location. Clue number one is a simple geometry puzzle based on the shadow cast by the pole (it makes an effective gnomon) at local noon. Of course the shadow points to a different place on different days. I hope you're here on the right day. Oh, those aren't just scratches in the rock -- they mean something? With your watch and compass handy, you figure this one out in no time. Clue number two is written right on the side of the cache box; you just didn't notice it at first because you didn't have your polarized glasses on. Why, that's plain old Morse code! And it spells out a line from a famous poem by William Butler Yeats. I'm sure you know the one. Clue number three is chiseled into the stone somewhere on the summit, and you stumble across it before very long. Nothing hidden, not time-dependent, this one is sitting right out in the open waiting for you. A giveaway! As long as you recall how to solve incomplete elliptic integrals of the third kind... Clue number four isn't on the summit at all. No, it's right across the way on the north peak. Unfortunately it's reflectorized, only readable after dark by shining a powerful light across the way. Since it's totally unreadable during the daytime, you'll have to camp up here over night (unless you want to try that descent after dark... Don't even think about it!). Your high school German is a little rusty, but you can still chuckle over this ribald limerick. Now what year was Kaiser Wilhelm's coronation again? Of course nobody would ever design a cache that made you solve a variety of puzzles. One that required mental and physical agility. One that might require special preparation to find or open. One that might only be accessible on certain days, or at certain times. One that might require several visits to complete. Would they? I hope you see my point. An unlocked ammo box sitting out in plain sight is a 1 for difficulty.
  13. ifranz, I'm not trying to rain on your parade. You worked hard to achieve something difficult, and I understand your enthusiasm. Congrats on the climb, and I hope each one in the future brings you as much pleasure and feeling of accomplishment. Now let's try a little thought experiment. Imagine you have just reached the top of the south peak as you describe on the cache page...and you discover the following: The ammo box is welded to the top of a 3-meter metal pole embedded in the rock. The pole is completely smooth, about 8cm in diameter. When you get up to the box, you discover that it is sealed with a combination lock. There are four clues to help you determine the combination. These clues are all readily accessible from the cache location. Clue number one is a simple geometry puzzle based on the shadow cast by the pole (it makes an effective gnomon) at local noon. Of course the shadow points to a different place on different days. I hope you're here on the right day. Oh, those aren't just scratches in the rock -- they mean something? With your watch and compass handy, you figure this one out in no time. Clue number two is written right on the side of the cache box; you just didn't notice it at first because you didn't have your polarized glasses on. Why, that's plain old Morse code! And it spells out a line from a famous poem by William Butler Yeats. I'm sure you know the one. Clue number three is chiseled into the stone somewhere on the summit, and you stumble across it before very long. Nothing hidden, not time-dependent, this one is sitting right out in the open waiting for you. A giveaway! As long as you recall how to solve incomplete elliptic integrals of the third kind... Clue number four isn't on the summit at all. No, it's right across the way on the north peak. Unfortunately it's reflectorized, only readable after dark by shining a powerful light across the way. Since it's totally unreadable during the daytime, you'll have to camp up here over night (unless you want to try that descent after dark... Don't even think about it!). Your high school German is a little rusty, but you can still chuckle over this ribald limerick. Now what year was Kaiser Wilhelm's coronation again? Of course nobody would ever design a cache that made you solve a variety of puzzles. One that required mental and physical agility. One that might require special preparation to find or open. One that might only be accessible on certain days, or at certain times. One that might require several visits to complete. Would they? I hope you see my point. An unlocked ammo box sitting out in plain sight is a 1 for difficulty.
  14. You're obviously determined to rate this as a 5/5. Your choice. But I think it's a clear 1/5 for the reasons already stated by the previous posters. quote:Don't even consider this one unless...if you fall without protection you can, and probably will die...Planning the climb takes extensive research and preparation...death wish...a tremendous amount of physical ability, specialized knowledge, and hundreds of dollars in climbing equipment...You’d kill yourself trying to find this one... You're obviously very proud of your climbing prowess to resort to such bombast. I'm glad you enjoy the sport. Believe it or not there are other geocachers who understand the demands of technical climbing. The fact remains that all of the difficulty is encountered during the "reaching the cache site" phase; no physical ability or skull sweat is required once the climber summits. Similarly, a cache that required scuba gear to reach, or a vacuum suit, or was located on the Artctic ice pack, would all rate a 5 for terrain. But if the cache itself is obvious and easily accessible once the cacher arrives at the location, it's a 1 for difficulty. quote:The coordinates listed are for the parking lot where you hike in to the climbing area. Ah, there's your problem. If the cache coordinates were for the top of the peak -- where the actual cache is located -- the rating issue would be clear. quote:I didn't place the ammo box, so please make this a take nothing leave nothing cache So you're simply directing other cachers to a location. This isn't a traditional container-based cache at all. You didn't put that ammo box there and you're not acting as the cache owner to stock it and maintain it as needed. Since you just want others to reach a specific destination, this might be better listed as a virtual cache: From the geocaching glossary: quote:So a virtual cache means ... It's the location that is the cache itself. Nothing is normally traded, except photos and experiences. I'm not attempting to downplay the difficulty of the climb; it sounds interesting and challenging. A 5 rating for terrain should be plenty; not many will attempt this one!
  15. You're obviously determined to rate this as a 5/5. Your choice. But I think it's a clear 1/5 for the reasons already stated by the previous posters. quote:Don't even consider this one unless...if you fall without protection you can, and probably will die...Planning the climb takes extensive research and preparation...death wish...a tremendous amount of physical ability, specialized knowledge, and hundreds of dollars in climbing equipment...You’d kill yourself trying to find this one... You're obviously very proud of your climbing prowess to resort to such bombast. I'm glad you enjoy the sport. Believe it or not there are other geocachers who understand the demands of technical climbing. The fact remains that all of the difficulty is encountered during the "reaching the cache site" phase; no physical ability or skull sweat is required once the climber summits. Similarly, a cache that required scuba gear to reach, or a vacuum suit, or was located on the Artctic ice pack, would all rate a 5 for terrain. But if the cache itself is obvious and easily accessible once the cacher arrives at the location, it's a 1 for difficulty. quote:The coordinates listed are for the parking lot where you hike in to the climbing area. Ah, there's your problem. If the cache coordinates were for the top of the peak -- where the actual cache is located -- the rating issue would be clear. quote:I didn't place the ammo box, so please make this a take nothing leave nothing cache So you're simply directing other cachers to a location. This isn't a traditional container-based cache at all. You didn't put that ammo box there and you're not acting as the cache owner to stock it and maintain it as needed. Since you just want others to reach a specific destination, this might be better listed as a virtual cache: From the geocaching glossary: quote:So a virtual cache means ... It's the location that is the cache itself. Nothing is normally traded, except photos and experiences. I'm not attempting to downplay the difficulty of the climb; it sounds interesting and challenging. A 5 rating for terrain should be plenty; not many will attempt this one!
  16. Is it a complete coincidence that last year's (2001) Mysterium took place in that very neigborhood -- Carlsbad, NM? Perhaps something about the location gave someone an idea... I remember seeing the original Myst before it was actually released. Cyan was distributing "teaser" CDs at MacWorld in Boston. A friend of mine picked one up and dragged me over to take a look at it.
  17. Is it a complete coincidence that last year's (2001) Mysterium took place in that very neigborhood -- Carlsbad, NM? Perhaps something about the location gave someone an idea... I remember seeing the original Myst before it was actually released. Cyan was distributing "teaser" CDs at MacWorld in Boston. A friend of mine picked one up and dragged me over to take a look at it.
  18. Marty is, unfortunately, correct. Associating IPs with users can only go so far. Although it's likely that most casual geocaching.com visitors only have a single ISP account, with most consumer ISPs the customer is dynamically assigned an IP from a pool of addresses at connect time. Obviously AOL doesn't have enough IPs for every subscriber... They only need enough for their anticipated maximum number of concurrent dialup users, a far smaller figure. I for one have read (and possibly posted -- I'm not keeping track) from home on both dialup and ADSL (different ISPs), as well as from half a dozen clients while on their premises. I'd hate to be under suspicion of being a troll or a sock puppet just because I move around. If I *were* interested in concealing a false identity... Well, how many public points of Internet access can you think of? How about most public libraries? Internet cafes? How many open 802.11b nodes are there in Seattle or San Francisco? And if someone is really interested, it's not hard to fake the IP that a Web server "sees" from a browser connection. And now for something completely different... quote:Very similar to seagull management, where a manager flaps in, craps and squawks all over the place, and quicky flaps away from the ensuing chaos. LOL! Jeremy, this reminds me of mushroom management. You know: Keep them in the dark, feed them s**t, and when they grow up, cut them off at the knees! JAR
  19. I see that there were 257 posts to the "Caching with weapons" thread in a single week. (And still it goes on.) I can't help but wonder if that's a record... And I'm very much afraid to learn that it's not! How's the disk space holding up, Jeremy? "Decision making factor absent from brain"
  20. Common sense? Where exactly do you propose to encounter that? Let me bore you with a brief (true) anecdote: I once knew a police dispatcher who worked in a town of about 65,000 souls. When his PD posted competitive exams for the position, he placed first out of 80 applicants. He was generally considered to be good at his job by the officers he directed (his superiors also rated him highly, but who cares what the bosses think?). I mention this only to establish that he was a generally clueful individual who made his living attempting to extract useful facts from those who did "call the cops." I recall very clearly his comment about common sense: "If there was a single ounce of common sense evenly divided among the population, I'd be out of a job." His continued employment was never at risk. "Decision making factor absent from brain"
  21. quote:The latest and greatest????? --mikemtn Mike, The Maha MH-C777PLUS is a fine charger for its intended use: recharging NiCd and NiMH battery packs from various manufacturers. There is a detailed review of it at Steve's Digicams (also see my link above). Unfortunately the MH-C777PLUS doesn't charge AA cells (the kind found in most GPS receivers) directly; you must get a separate battery holder, and you must charge at least 4 cells at a time. It also won't charge Li-Ion batteries; too bad, because the floating contact pin arrangement would let me charge all my Canon, Nikon, Sony, etc. battery packs! quote:Really good charger I purchased a MAHA MH-C2045 over the internet for $35 including 2 NIMH batteries. Night Stalker, I trust you mean the MH-C204F. It's a fine charger; see the comments above. I personally prefer a charger that doesn't need a wall wart, but I know lots of folks using the C204F who are very happy with it. JAR "Decision making factor absent from brain"
  22. Thanks for the heads-up. I downloaded the update and wrote it to my 76S; everything went without a hitch. It's interesting that Garmin is continuing to add new features, not just fix bugs. So far I am very happy with my 76S. "Decision making factor absent from brain"
  23. quote:And so, the Bournemouth Horror was unmasked at last, and laid to rest by the side of his hideous clockwork dog, Toto. Yes, I think majicman's been nipping at the rat cheese again! Or at least Uncle Sigmund's Peruvian Cocoa Powder... You throw a salad on Caeser? Ahh! I bleed from 57 seven wounds! I've been waiting for Melanie Haber to show up as a geocaching user name. I mean Audrey Farber. Susan Underhill? What about... Betty Jo Bialowsky! So let's crack open a Bear Whiz Beer and enjoy! (Like my daddy always used to say: "It's in the water! that's why it's yellow!") JAR "Decision making factor absent from brain"
  24. I assumed this would be the cross-dressing thread. Am I in the wrong place? (<- Deep metaphysical query with convenient geocaching allusion)
  25. "Porgie Tirebiter, He's a spy and a girl delighter! Orgie, firefighter, Just a student like you!" So, majicman, you thought your FT reference would go unnoticed? Shoes for Industry!
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