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PC-Realestacher

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Posts posted by PC-Realestacher

  1. Have planned to set a traditional cache container, but also received permission to put another one nearby. The other cache will have somewhat limited access, so we thought it might be a cool "Bonus" cache-- in other words, when cacher finds the first, clues will be left to lead to the second (surprise!). If I do this, can cachers get credit for two finds? Do I set up a separate page for the "Bonus" cache? Is there a distance requirement for the "bonus" cache?

  2. Thanks for the advice and I'm doing just that. The original cache was a good idea at the time and it has held up relatively well, considering the fact that I don't think it has been touched by the CO since it was set. But now it is no longer waterproof and is just a big mess! Such a great spot deserves a cache that will bring visitors-- or at least give them a log that they can sign.

  3. people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to, and there they do a few more calculations to determine the dewey decimal number of a book

     

    We are currently working with one of our local libraries to place a cache there. Their rules, however, will not allow us to put an entry in the library computer for the cache, since it is not an actual book that can be loaned. We visited another cache in a nearby library whose coordinates led to the library door and the title of the cache was simply a string of numbers (which, of course, turned out to be the Dewey Decimal number assigned to the book/cache). It was only a blank journal-type log and was placed in the maps section of the library. You could also place it in "hobbies" or really a number of other places in the library and let your clues lead cachers there.

     

    One suggestion: we also have done a "book/box," but found that most geocaching books in print are fairly thin. You need a substantial, hard-back TOME to make a good traditional cache. We ended up buying a big medical book from the library when they were cleaning house and used that-- along with a fake book jacket that we created. Note: make your book jacket first and put it on the book (including a plastic cover from the library) BEFORE you start creating the book/box. Once the pages are glued together and the center hollowed out, you will have a hard time adding the jacket.

  4. Find another spot. I geocache to get outside. Not to take me inside a building.

     

    I suppose it depends on the building, right?

    Getting outdoors is one of the great things about caching, true. But I love how it takes me to interesting places, spots that are significant to the CO, and areas that I might otherwise never have bothered to find. I like it when COs place information about the location on the page-- why they chose it, why it is worthy of visiting. I live in a very tourist-friendly area and a lot of people cache here when they are on vacation. This gives them a chance to see other parts of the town besides just the beaches and tourist corridor-- including some wonderful caches (some indoors) in our Historic District.

     

    You don't always have to get attacked by thorns and ticks to have a successful day caching!

  5. You can't adopt it unless the owner sends you an adoption link. If you want, you can email them and ask. If you get no replies, and the cache is in bad shape, post a needs maintenance. If the needs maintenance is not answered, post a needs archived. If it gets archived, hide a cache there. Without the owner offering it up for adoption, you can't adopt it. Kind of like walking down the street, seeing a cute kid and taking it home to adopt. Nobody said you could do that. The cache parent has to want to adopt it out. Right now, it needs maintenance, and if there have been NM logs on it, it is time for a Needs Archived note, which goes to the reviewer's attention. Then you put a watch on the cache and have your cache ready to go out, you will get an email when it is archived. Be ready. Good spots go quick in some places.

     

    Okay, so I HAVE sent an emailed request for adoption and a "NEEDS MAINTENANCE" notice. I'll give it a few days, then go for the "NEEDS ARCHIVED" note and get the reviewers involved. Thanks for the great advice!

  6. There is an abandoned cache in a wonderful location that I would love to adopt. The CO stopped caching entirely not long after placing this cache and clearly hasn't touched it since (nearly 3 years). The top of the container is missing; the log is a rotting, mildewed mess-- could not sign, could not read; it is nothing but a home to worms and spiders now. I sent a "Maintenance" note to the CO after my find, but nothing has been done. Then I messaged the CO through Geocaching.com and requested that he let me adopt the cache. Again, nothing. Is there a protocol for archiving a cache (or location) when the CO is no longer active or responding to messages?

  7. Virtual waypoints do not count when testing for cache saturation. So, at your chosen spot you can use some existing object that you did not place into the environment -- such as an information sign -- to provide clues that can be plugged into a formula. When the puzzle is solved the seeker will be led to a physical container and logbook placed at a spot that's at least 528 feet from any other cache container.

     

    ***So, you are saying that there is NO WAY that we can place a cache container less than 528 feet from an existing cache?

  8. We have a wonderful cache idea in an indoor, secure location inside a public building. We have permission from the management. However, we have discovered a fairly nearby (about 300 ft. away) cache. Is there anything we can do to be able to place our cache? Is the physical location of the actual cache a consideration on a puzzle cache? (We considered doing one of those or a multi that would ultimately lead to this cache-- whatever). Ideas PLEASE!

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