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gpsfun

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Everything posted by gpsfun

  1. I'm in general agreement with Totem Clan and wimseyguy; however, there are some specific areas or locations where geocachers are not welcome in cemeteries. Just like there are some cemeteries that no longer allow visitors who may wish to make gravestone rubbings, etc. If you are considering using a visit to a cemetery as part of a cache you are developing, it would be wise to drop a note to your local reviewer to make sure there are no issues that are not known to you. Your reviewer's job is to help you to get your cache page published (within the boundaries of the guidelines, of course) and sometimes asking a quick question can save you a lot of rework.
  2. Their phone number indicates that they are in Superstition (east) [Phoenix], AZ. As to how they got your e-mail address, once one spammer has it, it spreads like kudzu.
  3. I don't know about you, but my story is that I've had a lot of practice.
  4. Can you provide the waypoint number (GC?????) of the cache page you created? Perhaps someone would look it up and offer you a suggestion or two.
  5. It is also appropriate to contact the cache owner through their profile to let them know you are stuck and in need of a hint. Cache owners are under no obligation to disclose hints, but some may feel inclined to give you a nudge in the right direction.
  6. There are two questions here. If the character or design of a cache is changed significantly, such as changing a multistage cache to a single stage (traditional) cache, then a new cache page is in order. Since many persons are concerned with the numbers, finding a single stage cache should not count as finding a multistage cache. The second question has already been answered - if it is a new cache, even at the same location as an archived cache, it counts as another find. This is not uncommon when a geocacher leaves the game, picking up and archiving their caches. Someone may place a new cache at or near a previously used location.
  7. Upgrade your vista machine to XP. Did that at work and on one of my home machines to fix a TON of bugs. If you purchased a new unit with Vista installed, it will be helpful to make certain that all of the installed hardware (such as the display and sound) have XP drivers available before you upgrade to XP. Some vendors of brand new hardware devices have made only Vista drivers available and reportedly have no intention of creating XP drivers.
  8. This makes me think of a situation where a baseball player is called up to the majors, and when approaching the batter's box for his first major league at-bat, he begins to instruct the umpire on the technical details of calling balls and strikes. I'd love to be able to listen to that conversation.
  9. I'm sure someone will be able to help you with this, but it will be helpful to know what version of IE you are using for starters. A description of what does or does not happen when IE does not work will also be helpful.
  10. In my area, there are nearly monthly listed events, plus CITOs, plus biweekly informal dinners, so there is ample opportunity for everyone including new folks. To be clear, I very satisfied with my local reviewers and discussed the idea with them. When I pointed out this event that requires attendees to find a series of caches in order to attend, one of the reviewers suggested I submit my event to GC.com for review. The logs look like it was well-received. Perhaps this statement on the referenced cache page was overlooked:
  11. I have noticed that some owners of small, micro and nano caches have requested that labels not be used when logging their caches due to the amount of space a label consumes vs. just initials. You may wish to check cache descriptions for this before starting out.
  12. You might try having someone make an informal presentation on a topic that will be of interest to new, somewhat inexperienced geocachers, and have a similar presentation on a topic that will interest those who are more experienced. Sample topics for new geocachers: selecting good hiking boots and other clothing what to carry in a geocaching kit, backpack, etc. area rules - what's off limits or inappropriate in your area Sample topics for more experienced geocachers: paperless geocaching using GSAK and other applications using Geocache Navigator with a Boost phone preparing for extended hiking trips Don't let presentations dominate your event, though. Most geocachers seem to like the opportunity for social interaction at least as much as the opportunity to learn something new. And food is usually a good draw.
  13. One of the more useful tools for deciding on a location for a new cache is personal knowledge of the area, which can be obtained by finding as many of the nearby caches as possible, including multistage and puzzle caches. Discovering that there is a proximity issue after a cache has been placed and a cache page has been submitted for review can be frustrating, and doing some homework up front to avoid this is well worth the effort.
  14. "Big box" is a general term for retail establishments that are, er, big. Some of them may have building supplies, or groceries, or household items, or electronics, etc. In many cases they are free standing entities, causing them to stand out from their surroundings.
  15. Sorry to hear of your injury. A cache requiring the use of special equipment qualifies to have a five star rating, so you might consider looking for one where a boat is required. That is if you have a boat or a friend with a boat AND a suitable cache within striking distance. Good luck.
  16. Could you cite some specific references please?
  17. "Can be" is the key part of that statement. At the other end of the continuum, they can be real pieces of trash. Regrettably, not all good cache finders are good cache hiders.
  18. Responding to the original question, you did nothing wrong but placing the information in a reviewer note is redundant. Placing the coordinates for each stage in additional hidden waypoints is sufficient.
  19. Any time it appears not to be acting right, recalibrate the electronic compass. I believe mine goes off occasionally after being plugged into my USB port for a while. It seems I can never remember this, but it is not necessary for you to turn around twice while holding the GPSr level - you need only lay it in the palm of one hand and turn it slowly with the other.
  20. Well, Mtn-Man, there go your chances of being nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  21. Two things. First, I found that using the same USB plug on my laptop each time I attach my 60CSx seems to prevent this issue. Second, I copied the CD provided by Garmin to a folder on my hard drive, so if I get a request for the USB driver I can just point to the file on my hard drive. I have had no more trouble, but I'm not sure which action really resolved the issue.
  22. CTD only has these complaints because he is in my review territory.
  23. I have a 60CSx that has been performing quite well, but while caching with an out of town visitor a couple of weeks ago it kept sending us around the block. (This was an urban cache, but there were no nearby buildings higher than two stories.) Finally my friend asked for the coordinates and punched them into her Magellan - two minutes later when I had my head stuck in a holly bush I heard the "found it" from more than 100 feet away! The bad part was that I had been ragging on her about my great "Garmin" all weekend, and then this happened. If I had it to do over, I would have tried turning WAAS off to see if that would have changed anything. Also, I should have turned the unit off and then back on in an open area to let it sync up with some satellites that were not directly overhead. If the GPSr would take us to within one foot of every cache, the game wouldn't be anywhere near as much fun.
  24. When the reason for a cache owner being unresponsive is not known, it may be due to unavoidable circumstances such as illness, deployment for military service, family issues, unresolved ISP issues and the like. If the absent cache owner returns to the sport and finds their cache adopted out to someone else, they may look at it more as an abduction than an adoption - even though the previously mentioned processes may have been executed with precision. Allowing Groundspeak's volunteer reviewer to archive the old cache, as permitted by the guidelines, can serve to insulate a new cache owner in such cases. When the reason for the cache owner being unresponsive is known, adoption may be a reasonable alternative. Nearly every circumstance is different and deserves individual consideration.
  25. Here's two more cents. I wonder how long it will take this thread to get to $1.00? If you encounter a specific cache that is bothersome to you at some level, you can contact the cache owner to register your concerns. If you believe there may be an issue of safety or legality involved, you could post a needs archived log to get a volunteer reviewer engaged, or send an e-mail to the reviewer if you don't want to turn your concerns into a spoiler. It will be hard for people to respond constructively when only a list of generalities is tossed out for discussion.
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